In Pictures: Young GAA fans meet their idols at Castletown and Colt Cúl Camps

first_img By LaoisToday Reporter – 13th July 2018 In Pictures: Young GAA fans meet their idols at Castletown and Colt Cúl Camps WhatsApp Twitter Twitter Pinterest TAGSCastletown GAAColt GAACúl Camps Community Laois senior hurlers such as Mark Kavanagh, PJ Scully, Sean Downey, Ryan Mullaney were on hand to help the stars of the future hone their skills.Young camógs also were spoilt for choice with their mentors being Laois camogie’s Lizzy Ryan and Molly O’Connor. WhatsApp Pinterest Facebook Brought to you in association with All Books and News Portlaoise Young GAA fans came in their droves to Colt GAA club and Castletown GAA to get the chance to be taught all the tricks of the trade by their hurling and camogie idols this week.center_img Charlie Flanagan on Electric Picnic: ‘I’d ask organisers to consult with community leaders’ Rugby Home GAA Cul Camps In Pictures: Young GAA fans meet their idols at Castletown and Colt… GAACul CampsSport Ten Laois based players named on Leinster rugby U-18 girls squad RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook SEE ALSO – In Pictures: The Emo Cul Camp where every kid wants to be a certain goalkeeper Cúl Camps galore This week has been abuzz with Cúl Camps fun – with camps in Emo, Ballyroan and Barrowhouse.Our photographer took to both Colt and Castletown Cúl Camps on Thursday to get photos of all the action.SEE ALSO – Laois GAA announce details of new O Mordha Og training programme Five Laois monuments to receive almost €200,000 in government funding Previous articleFunding provided for new first responder ambulance in LaoisNext articleClonaslee is looking forward to one of its biggest fundraisers of the year LaoisToday Reporter Community last_img read more

New U.S. legislation sacrifices investor protection, regulators say

“The JOBS bill the President signed today is based on faulty premises and will seriously hurt all investors by either eliminating or reducing transparency and investor protections. It will make securities law enforcement much more difficult,” said Jack Herstein, NASAA president and assistant director of the Nebraska Department of Banking and Finance, Bureau of Securities. “Investors need to prepare themselves to be bombarded with all manner of offerings and sales pitches. Congress has just released every huckster, scam artist, and small business owner and salesman onto the internet,” he added. NASAA is particularly concerned about portions of the bill that require the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to establish a registration exemption for so-called “crowdfunding”, which allows firms to raise small amounts of money from a large number of investors. NASAA says that issuers that use the crowdfunding exemption will be required to disclose a minimal amount of information to the SEC, and state securities regulators will be prevented from reviewing or registering securities sold under the exemption in their states. The state securities regulators say they do not object to the concept of crowdfunding. Their objection is with the provision that prevents them from having a role in regulating these offerings, leaving it entirely to the SEC. “Lacking adequate funding, the SEC has neither the resources nor the time to effectively police these relatively small, localized securities offerings before they are sold to the public,” Herstein said. “As a result, crowdfunding offers are likely to receive little regulatory scrutiny until after a fraudulent sale has been committed. This is an investor protection disaster waiting to happen.” “The notion of crowdfunding as originally conceived is a relatively innocuous way to promote creativity,” said Steve Irwin, chairman of NASAA’s Committee on Federal Legislation and Pennsylvania Commissioner of Securities. “But the crowdfunding exemption enacted in the JOBS Act is rife with risk, not only for the investors who think they are getting on the ground floor of the next Google or Facebook, but for the countless targets of unscrupulous con artists playing on the unsophisticated, gullible, and vulnerable.” “By preempting states, the JOBS Act takes the handcuffs away from state regulators and puts them on us,” Irwin added. “Although intended to stimulate the economy, if recent history is any guide the JOBS Act may once again show how hasty and unreasonable deregulation often leads to disastrous results.” NASAA also expressed skepticism about the legislation’s ability to create new jobs and stimulate the economy, questioning its underlying assumption that burdensome regulations are inhibiting investment in small business and stifling job growth. Securities regulators warn of an “investor protection disaster”, as they say new legislation to enable “crowdfunding” in the U.S. will, in fact, enable scam artists. The North American Securities Administrators Association said that by passing the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act, known as the JOBS Act, on Thursday, “Congress and the White House have sacrificed investor protection.” James Langton Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Facebook LinkedIn Twitter read more

Dutkiewicz to join Sentry Investments

Toronto-based Sentry Investments has strengthened its fixed-income capabilities by adding James Dutkiewicz to lead its fixed-income portfolio management team effective May 16, the company said Thursday. Dutkiewicz will join Sentry as vice president and senior portfolio manager. NEO, Invesco launch four index PTFs FSRA appoints new board member Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Franklin Templeton renames funds with new managers “We are excited to add a portfolio manager with James’ expertise and track record,” says Dennis Mitchell, chief investment officer and senior portfolio manager. Dutkiewicz will take over as lead portfolio manager of Sentry Tactical Bond Fund and Sentry Tactical Bond Capital Yield Class. He will also be responsible for the fixed-income investments for Sentry Conservative Balanced Income Fund, Sentry Conservative Balanced Income Class and Sentry Growth and Income Fund. Dutkiewicz will replace Shane Stuck, who is leaving the firm. The investment objectives, investment strategies and all other attributes of each fund remain unchanged. Dutkiewicz has over 19 years’ experience analyzing and managing fixed-income securities. Prior to joining Sentry, he was responsible for managing or co-managing over $10 billion in assets as vice president, portfolio management and portfolio manager with Signature Global Advisors of CI Investments Inc. Dutkiewicz has a B.A. in Economics from Wilfred Laurier University and holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation. Sentry Investments has over $7 billion in assets under management on behalf of Canadian investors. Related news Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Keywords Fund managers,  AppointmentsCompanies Sentry Investments Inc. IE Staff read more

Minister of Foreign Affairs & Foreign Trade Reaffirms Government’s Commitment to Human Rights

first_imgMinister of Foreign Affairs & Foreign Trade Reaffirms Government’s Commitment to Human Rights UncategorizedDecember 11, 2008 FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade, Hon. Dr. Kenneth Baugh, has reiterated the government’s commitment to the realisation of economic, social and cultural rights even while paying attention to the protection of civil and political rights.Minister Baugh was declaring open this morning (Wednesday) at the Foreign Ministry, an exhibition to commemorate the 60th Anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Today was also Human Rights Day.The Minister noted that sixty years since the Declaration, much remained to be done. The exhibition, organized by the Ministry in collaboration with the Jamaica National Commission for UNESCO, was intended to draw attention to how we can come together to ensure the implementation no the Declaration. This was an objective to which Jamaica had traditionally given support, Dr. Baugh said, citing the late Hugh Shearer’s initiative which had led to the UN endorsing the idea for the designation of 1968 as the International Year of Human Rights to commemorate the 20th Anniversary of the adoption of the Declaration.“We are proud of the tradition and we are committed to improving the situation of human rights as both the national and international levels.“As part of this endeavour we will continue to work towards giving increased and equal attention to not only protection of civil and political rights but also to the realisation of economic, social and cultural rights.“Jamaica is of the firm conviction that while attention must be given to issues regarding the right to life and equality before the law, attention should also be given to education, the right to work, and the right to an adequate standard of living. The Government of Jamaica is unwavering in its commitment in this regard,” Dr. Baugh declared as he encouraged everyone to assist in the process to ensure that all human rights are fully respected and protected.Greetings were brought by H.E. Filomena Navarro Tavarez, Vice Dean of the Diplomatic Corps; and Dr. Kwame Boafo, Director UNESCO Caribbean Office.Choc’late Allen youth activist and entertainer as well as the New day Primary and Junior High School also performed.Ambassador Vilma McNish, Under-Secretary, Multilateral Affairs Division, in the Foreign Ministry extended welcome while Mrs. Norma Taylor Roberts, Director of the International Organizations Department in the Ministry, presided. RelatedMinister of Foreign Affairs & Foreign Trade Reaffirms Government’s Commitment to Human Rights RelatedMinister of Foreign Affairs & Foreign Trade Reaffirms Government’s Commitment to Human Rightscenter_img Advertisements RelatedMinister of Foreign Affairs & Foreign Trade Reaffirms Government’s Commitment to Human Rightslast_img read more

Steps Forward for Testing to Reopen Borders Without Quarantine

first_imgSteps Forward for Testing to Reopen Borders Without Quarantine It is a critical output produced by the ICAO Collaborative Arrangement for the Prevention and Management of Public Health Events in Civil Aviation (CAPSCA). CAPSCA brings together the expertise of states, public health authorities (World Health Organization/WHO, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control) and industry experts (IATA, Airports Council International, International Coordinating Council of Aerospace Industries Associations).This encouraging progress follows recent comments from the WHO’s International Health Regulations Emergency Committee Chair, Dr. Didier Houssin, who foresees a role for testing as a means of re-opening international travel without quarantine measures. Following the WHO Emergency Committee meeting on 30 October 2020, he said that, “clearly the use of the tests is certainly now supposed to have a much larger place compared to quarantine, for example, which would certainly facilitate things considering all the efforts which have been made by airlines and by airports.”“Momentum is building in support of our call for systematic testing to safely re-open borders without quarantine measures. ICAO, working with health authorities and industry, has produced a high-level framework. Health authorities are beginning to explore how testing could supersede quarantine to stop the cross-border spread of the virus. Encouraging results from testing pilot programs should now give states the confidence to move forward quickly,” said Alexandre de Juniac, IATA’s Director General and CEO.Testing—Efficacy and PerformancePilot programs for COVID-19 testing of travelers are beginning to produce encouraging results proving their efficacy.A study on arriving passengers in Toronto tested passengers three times: on arrival, at day 5 and at day 14. One percent of passengers tested positive over that period, with 70% being detected with the first test. In other words, the study’s results could indicate the potential for about 60 out of every 20,000 travelers to go undetected on arrival, which is significantly lower than the underlying prevalence in Canada.A pre-departure testing program for the Milan/Linate-Rome/Fiumicino route detected about 0.8% of passengers with COVID-19. As this level of incidence is considerably higher than the reported prevalence of COVID-19 in Italy at the time, it would appear that not only was testing highly effective in identifying infected travelers but that systematic testing is the best way to detect asymptomatic cases and to break chains of transmission.A soon to be published European study is even more optimistic. It models scenarios for a highly effective testing mechanism. In a low prevalence scenario, there is the potential to see the number of undetected positive cases as few as 5 per 20,000 travelers, increasing to 25 in high prevalence situations. These levels of incidence are still much lower than the underlying prevalence of COVID-19 in Europe.IATA modeled the testing results to quantify the risk that would remain if systematic pre-departure testing were implemented. Assuming that testing identifies 75% of travelers correctly who have COVID-19 (the effectiveness of the test) from a source population with a prevalence of 0.8% of the population (e.g., similar to Chile), the risk is that 0.06% of passengers would have the disease and go undetected. That would mean 12 undetected positive cases for every 20,000 arriving passengers.These studies all point in the direction of testing being an efficient means to limit the spread of COVID-19 through air travel. “Data show that systematic testing can reduce the risk of importing COVID-19 through travel to very low levels—not zero, but very low. Certainly in most cases it would reduce risk to levels that mean that arriving passengers are less likely to be infected than the local population and therefore do not add meaningfully to the prevalence of COVID-19 in most places. Efficiency will increase. Advances in technology are happening every day that will improve testing performance,” said de Juniac.IATA encourages speed and a focus on risk management. “Our mindset must be focused on managing the risks of the virus while maintaining the overall well-being of the population. That would be a shift from current government policies entirely focused on risk elimination until a vaccine is available and at any cost to people’s lives and livelihoods. Even with recent encouraging news, it will be well into 2021 before we can expect large scale vaccination. In the meantime, denying people the freedom of mobility will do irreparable damage to jobs and our way of life. Strategies with risk-based testing offer a pathway which can safely facilitate an economic revival benefitting from the rewards of a re-connected world. Governments could further reduce the risk by investing in effective contact tracing and health monitoring programs to quickly isolate any potential community transmission. And there could even be benefits to controlling the disease by large scale testing of travelers who are not displaying symptoms,” said de Juniac.Significant advances in testing technology will help governments implement testing for travelers without compromising the availability of tests directly related to the healthcare sector, particularly polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing. For testing to be incorporated into the travel process it must be fast, accurate, scalable, easy to use and affordable. While IATA does not recommend a specific test type, laboratory reported accuracy for the rapid antigen test (RAT) does meet the aforementioned criteria. The Oxford/Public Health England study indicates 99.6% specificity along with very high sensitivity for RAT.PracticalitiesTesting is supported by travelers. An IATA survey revealed that 83% of people would not travel if it required quarantine. It also showed that some 88% of travelers would be willing to be tested if it enabled travel. The same survey also revealed that 65% believe that quarantine should not be necessary if someone tests negative for COVID-19. “Public opinion supports COVID-19 testing. They see it as a far better option compared to quarantine which kills travel. And they feel comfortable that if you are tested and found negative you don’t need to quarantine,” said de Juniac.Global standards are needed to transform the many testing pilots and “bubbles” into a global re-start of international flying. To support this IATA is developing:A practical implementation guide for the Manual on Testing and Cross Border Risk Management Measures The IATA Travel Pass to manage COVID-19 test certifications, one of several solutions in development to help manage testing certifications. IATA welcomes the evolution of a competitive market for these solutions that should be cost-effective, global, accurate and interoperable.SpeedIATA urges quick action by governments working with industry to implement a globally harmonized and systematic approach to COVID-19 testing in the travel process.Travel essentially remains in lockdown. Each day that this situation is prolonged puts more jobs at risk and makes the road to recovery that much more difficult.Implementation of a globally harmonized systematic testing regime for international travel would complement measures already well established to keep travelers safe. In June, ICAO published Take-off: Guidance for Air Travel through the COVID-19 Public Health Crisis which calls on governments to implement a multi-layered approach to sanitary measures throughout the travel process. Mask-wearing is especially key to the Take-off requirements with a strong consensus among recently published studies of air travel and COVID-19 pointing toward the very low risk of inflight transmission (Harvard, TRANSCOM).“Safety is at the core of aviation. This crisis has only reinforced that commitment. There has been an inspiring effort by governments, public health authorities and aviation entities to ensure safe operations even during this pandemic. ICAO’s Take-off guidelines are practical measures to deliver a safe public health environment from check-in to arrival. And the many advances on testing, including ICAO’s guidance, are what is needed to open borders while minimizing the risk of COVID-19 importation,” said de Juniac.View Testing and ​Safely Reopening Borders presentation (pdf) /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Aerospace, Air transport, building, civil aviation, community, efficiency, Emergency, environment, Government, healthcare, IATA, public health, public health crisis, speed, technology, vaccination, WHOlast_img read more

Vigil in memory of killed delivery riders

first_imgVigil in memory of killed delivery riders Food delivery riders and the Transport Workers’ Union will hold a vigil and lay flowers in memory of the five riders killed on the roads in the last two months.Riders and the TWU will call for reform in the sector to give riders protections they need.The vigil follows the deaths of UberEats riders Bijoy Paul on Saturday and an as yet unnamed rider on Monday. Xiaojun Chen, Dede Fredy and Chow Khai Shien died in October and late September. None had the right to training, proper safety gear or insurance because their companies deny them workplace and safety rights.TWU National Secretary Michael Kaine said riders want to see urgent change and noted the move by the NSW Government to set up a taskforce.“This is a very sad time for delivery riders and anyone who works in road transport. A death of a worker will always send shockwaves throughput the community. The death of five workers in less than two months is devastating. Riders will today pay their respects to these riders and will also call for changes so that the carnage stops,” he said.“The likes of Uber have been allowed to get away with trampling on workers’ right and risking their lives. Denying workers minimum rates, forcing them to race around to make enough to pay bills and threatening them with sacking if they are even a few minutes late is endangering workers. Workers urgently need minimum pay, training, proper protective gear and insurance,” Kaine said.“It has taken four rider deaths in Sydney for the NSW Government to set up a taskforce. The State Government needs to get on with this taskforce and ensure workers are central to it. The Federal Government also needs to acknowledge its role. It’s not good enough that states are in a piecemeal way trying to address the problem these billion dollar global tech giants have created. We need the Federal Government to act and regulate,” he added.A survey of delivery riders in September showed average earnings after costs was just over $10 an hour while almost 90% have seen their pay decrease and 70% say they are struggling to pay bills and buy food.The pandemic has left the essential workers exposed with more than half saying they did not have enough masks, gloves and sanitiser.More than one in three riders has been injured on the job, with the vast majority (80%) receiving no support from their company.The TWU and former Deliveroo rider Diego Franco were in the Fair Work Commission on Monday fighting an unfair sacking by the company. Deliveroo say they sacked Mr Franco because he didn’t go fast enough with his deliveries.On Friday the TWU will fight UberEats in the Federal Court over an Adelaide delivery driver sacked for being 10 minutes late.The TWU is also assisting delivery riders in pursuing Deliveroo on its obligations under workplace heathy and safety laws.The TWU won a case for unfair sacking against Foodora in 2018. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Adelaide, Commission, community, fair work, Fair Work Commission, Federal, federal court, federal government, Government, insurance, NSW, reform, Secretary, survey, Sydney, Transport, Transport Workers’ Unionlast_img read more

Community Grants Program Now Open

first_imgCommunity Grants Program Now Open Shoalhaven City Council is encouraging community groups and organisations to take advantage of Council’s Community Grants Program, which is now accepting applications.Grants between $300 and $5,000 are available to support collaborative efforts between community groups and organisations that are based in the Shoalhaven Local Government Area to deliver local projects that support the community.The Community Grants Program 2021 is offering five types of grants to develop projects, events or activities which respond to an identified area or need and support and enhance the lives of people in the Shoalhaven. Potential applicants must meet the eligibility criteria outlined in the program objectives and guidelines available on Council’s website.Available now – applications open 2 February 2021. Check website for individual closing dates.Community Wellbeing Grant This grant aims to maximise participation, connections, and a sense of belonging for people in the area to community groups and organisations to enable them to design, implement and complete projects that support and enhance the lives of people in the Shoalhaven.The Youth Inclusion Grant is for youth-led and youth-driven community projects that have a positive youth development focus and give young people the opportunity to develop a range of skills. Grants need to address young people’s identified needs in an innovative way and increase young people’s connections to the community.The COVID-19 Social Inclusion Grant is for programs that assist communities to rebuild and reconnect as a result of COVID-19 isolation. Coronavirus has had a significant impact on our community and we recognise the need to provide opportunities for community members to maintain social connections. The aim of the grant is to fund innovative ideas that help community to keep in touch by utilising phone calls, online platforms or other methods of communication and connection to ensure projects can be delivered during periods of increased restrictions.In NSW Youth Week is 16 – 24 April and Seniors Festival is 13 – 24 April which offers a unique opportunity to offer a range of intergenerational and interest-based activities that bring our community together in new ways. Youth Week and Seniors Festival Grants have been combined to provide funding to local community groups and organisations to host events that celebrate and support youth and seniors in the Shoalhaven. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:communication, community, coronavirus, council, covid-19, festival, Government, grants program, isolation, local council, Local Government, NSW, Seniors, Shoalhaven, Shoalhaven City Council, website, wellbeing, Youthlast_img read more

Farmers Continue to Off-Load Over Supply in St. Mary

first_imgRelatedFarmers Continue to Off-Load Over Supply in St. Mary By ASTON G. BAILEY, JIS Reporter RelatedFarmers Continue to Off-Load Over Supply in St. Mary Advertisements FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail PORT ANTONIO — The Rural Agricultural Development Authority (RADA) held its fifth Farmers’ Market in St. Mary at the Trinity boxing plant, in Pt. Maria, on April 2. As was the case with those held previously, patrons turned up early for the event in an effort take advantage of reduced prices on offer for the crops in the market. Over the past two months, the farmers’ market has become a regular feature of RADA in St. Mary, as it has been in a number of other parishes. They provide an opportunity for farmers to sell the excess produce  that  are reaped in the various communities. Among the provisions in great demand at the market were Irish potatoes, cabbage, carrot, sweet pepper and pumpkin. In an interview with JIS News,  RADA Marketing Officer for St. Mary, Alfred Dunkley said the market had achieved the same level of success as those held before. He reported that  approximately 17,000 tons of produce were sold during the day, with a total of  22 farmers participating and 1,100 persons making purchases. Noting that all the produce brought to the market had been sold, Mr. Dunkley said this was a clear indication that the event was serving its purpose of enabling farmers to sell their produce. Citing the participation of  farmers  from St. Mary and St Ann, the RADA Marketing Manager commended them for the co-operation and support they have been giving to  the  initiative, and encouraged them to continue  to  produce. RelatedFarmers Continue to Off-Load Over Supply in St. Mary Farmers Continue to Off-Load Over Supply in St. Mary AgricultureApril 5, 2011last_img read more

Lee, Perez among four tied in chilly Tampa

first_imgPALM HARBOR, Fla. – Matt Every made the best of the worst conditions Thursday at Innisbrook. Danny Lee, finally, seems to be playing good golf in any weather. They were among a four-way tie for the lead after the opening round of the Valspar Championship, a day so challenging that 3-under 68 was the highest score to lead after the first round in the 14-year history of this event. Pat Perez and Greg Chalmers also had 68s to share the lead. Valspar Championship: Articles, videos and photos Every was the only one among the leaders to play in the morning, when the temperatures were in the mid-50s and felt even colder because of a strong wind. He had three birdies on his last four holes, all of them about 15 feet or longer, and was five shots better than he would have hoped when he teed off. ”I would have been satisfied with 2 over today,” Every said. ”It was tough. This morning you couldn’t feel your hands. The wind was brutal.” The temperature warmed under full sunshine in the afternoon, though that only helped a little. Only three players broke 70 in the morning, with the average score nearly 3 1/2 shots over par. Eight players broke 70 in the afternoon, and the average for the day turned out to be 72.6. Lee was in the last group, and how he got to Tampa Bay explains why he was one of the leaders. The former U.S. Amateur champion had missed every cut this year, and six straight dating to the OHL Classic in Mexico last November. That changed last week in the Puerto Rico Open, when he posted all four rounds in the 60s to finish second to Chesson Hadley. That got him into the field at Innisbrook, and Lee kept right on rolling. He ran off three birdies in five holes to start his round and was the only player all day to reach 4 under with a birdie on the par-5 first. He dropped his only shot on No. 6 when he failed to get up-and-down from the bunker. ”I gained a lot of confidence after last week playing with the finish in Puerto Rico,” Lee said. ”It really helped me a lot with that confidence stuff, and I’m hitting it really well right now. My ball striking is the best it’s ever been, especially with the putting. I got the new claw grip – still working great, which is fantastic.” Only 25 players managed to break par. Matteo Manassero, who didn’t break 74 in four rounds at Doral last week, was in the large group at 69 that included Nicolas Colsaerts and Bill Haas. Russell Knox, who lost in a four-man playoff two weeks ago at the Honda Classic, was in the group at 70. John Merrick made bogey on his last two holes for a 70, while Peter Uihlein made birdie on two of his last three holes, including a 35-foot putt on his last hole, for a 70. This is a big week for Uihlein, a European Tour member, who is No. 73 in the world. He has only two more tournaments to try to get into the top 50 in the world and become eligible for the Masters. Justin Rose, at No. 7 the highest-ranked player in the world at Innisbrook, Luke Donald and 20-year-old Jordan Spieth were among those at 70. More cold was expected Friday morning before the warming trend returns the rest of the week. That means Lee, Perez and the others could face wind and cold at the start of their second round. Lee can only draw comparisons with his game, not the course or the conditions. He had never been to the Copperhead course, regarded by many as perhaps the best tournament course in Florida. He played a practice round Tuesday and jokingly said he would have shot about a 90. ”I was shocked how hard it was,” he said. ”Without the wind and the cold weather – even we’re playing in nice weather – it’s a very tough golf course.” Every traded birdies and bogeys until a strong finish. He made birdie putts of 15 feet on the sixth and seventh holes, and then made a 20-foot birdie putt on the par-3 eighth and he made par from a fairway bunker on his last hole. ”I’ve played enough to know the first round doesn’t matter that much,” Every said. ”This place is just going to be about not making doubles and taking yourself out of the tournament.” Perez played well on the West Coast, earning nearly $1 million, and then took three weeks off. He worked a little with his coach, but felt some rust early, so he was happy to get around Innisbrook at 68. And he was lucky to be playing late. ”Definitely the guys that teed off at 7:40, 7:50, they had the hardest of what we’re going to see this week,” Perez said. ”I think so far we got the good side.” DIVOTS: Angel Cabrera opened with a 72 with a backup set of clubs and rain gear belonging to swing coach Charlie Epps. Cabrera took one airline from Buenos Aires through Santiago and into Miami. The last he heard, his clubs and luggage were being shipped on another airline through Los Angeles. … Blake Adams withdrew with a hip injury after opening with a 78. Adams missed all but two tournaments last season with surgery on his left hip.last_img read more

Balance between technical, touch guiding Phil at AT&T

first_imgPEBBLE BEACH, Calif. – There may be a few extra wrinkles lining his familiar face these days, his visage a bit more weathered after traveling fairways and greens under the sun for more than two decades. And recently, he may have incorporated a few new buzzwords to describe his swing, hinting at a more technical approach to a game he refined by feel for years – like a sculptor crafting a masterpiece from a single slab. But make no mistake: the youthful spirit that propelled Phil Mickelson to unprecedented heights remains alive and well. The kid who trusted his touch without hesitation, the swashbuckler who took on every challenging shot with the same confident swagger? He’s in there, too. It seemed like that persona had been in hiding over much of the last two years. But as he embarks on a new approach with a new coach, Mickelson has tapped back into those inner workings that helped guide him to the first 42 career wins. And now, heading into the weekend at the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am one shot off the lead, Mickelson is in prime position to record win No. 43. Granted, Mickelson’s talking points of late have become increasingly technical, making it seem as though he had all but abandoned his innate touch and feel on the course. At the CareerBuilder Challenge, where he finished T-3, he spoke of “face awareness.” During last week’s Waste Management Phoenix Open it was “shot dispersions” and “divot patterns,” hardly the diction of a player directed by feel and touch. But as Lefty explained it after a 6-under 65 at Monterey Peninsula Country Club that followed a 68 at Spyglass Hill, the technical jargon is a necessary requirement to tap into those elusive elements as he continues the transition from Butch Harmon to Andrew Getson. “The only way to have proper feel and that slight sensitivity to get a ball to fade 5 or 6 feet, or get it to draw 4 or 5 feet, that stuff, you’ve got to be on plane,” Mickelson said. “Now that I’m starting to be back on plane, all that touch, sensitivity and feel is coming back.” That progression has been evident early this year, as Mickelson makes his fourth start in as many weeks. Outside of a poor round on the North Course at Torrey Pines that led to a missed cut, Mickelson has averaged 67.73 swipes per round in 2016. AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am: Articles, photos and videos That includes Friday’s effort on the most remote of the three courses in rotation this week, a round that Mickelson started by playing his first 10 holes in 7 under before stumbling a bit down the stretch. “I thought I was going to shoot a lot lower than I did,” he admitted. In an era where Trackman is king, players now have instant feedback on precisely what their ball and swing are doing at any given time. Launch angles and spin rates – along with acronyms that seem better suited for baseball sabermetrics – are now commonplace on a practice range. It’s a fine line, then, for even the best players: trust the gut instinct that got you to an elite level, or buy into what the numbers say about the state of your game. It represents a battle that Mickelson has waged even this week, as his tinkering has continued despite recent strong results. He tried a new driver for his opening round at Spyglass Hill in search of extra run off the tee before quickly replacing it, and a similar experiment with a new 3-wood cost him on at least three holes during Friday’s inward nine. Justin Rose trails Mickelson by a shot through two rounds, and he knows full well the temptation to mix science with skill. For Rose, though, that inner feel remains paramount. “Basically you can have your swing looking up-and-down, but if you haven’t got the inside working well, if you’re not firing the right muscles at the right time … you can have a swing that looks pretty good on camera that kind of goes off in the wrong direction,” Rose said. “So I think that it’s more the feel and the kinetics that are the most important thing.” Mickelson can derive an extra sense of comfort amid friendly confines this week on the Monterey Peninsula. After all, he’s already won this event four times – two more than the career win total of the four names surrounding his on the leaderboard. “He seems energized, excited, talking about the game feels easy, he’s enjoying it again,” Rose said. “He seems hungry for it, so it’s great.” But while he is trending in the right direction, Mickelson hasn’t gotten over the hump in quite some time. His most recent win remains the 2013 Open Championship, a victory that most viewed more as a watershed than one final moment in the sun. When asked to evaluate the current status of his game, Mickelson paused for a moment before flashing a grin that golf fans know all too well. “It’s pretty much there,” he said. “I’m very pleased with the way I’m striking the ball, the way I’m chipping, putting, all that stuff, the way it’s coming together.” It was briefly the look of a much younger man, one who dazzled crowds for years by relying on feel that few have ever known. It was the look of a man who finally, after a pair of lean years, may have unlocked the key to his confidence. “The last piece,” he added, “is mentally performing under the clutch.” The opportunity to complete the puzzle awaits this weekend at Pebble Beach.last_img read more