UK digital banks near 20m customers – but growth slows

first_img“The fall in average deposits points to their current struggle to consistently replace incumbent banks as the primary destination for monthly salaries,” he added.  Monday 24 February 2020 12:01 am Share Merry said that the “elephant in the room” for all banks was whether and when big tech competitors enter the market. “If it does, it will likely shake up the sector in a way that could make the current fight for customers and deposit balances pale into insignificance.” Digital lenders including Monzo, Revolut and Starling gained over six million new customers in the second half of last year to reach a global total of 19.6 million, according to a report by professional services firm Accenture.  With the exception of SME lender Oaknorth, all of the digital banks included in the report made losses of between £5 and £15 per customer last year.  whatsapp Digital banks operating in the UK edged towards 20 million customers in 2019, but slowing customer and deposit growth mean the lenders could face challenges on long term profitability, new figures show.  whatsapp “While there is no denying their popularity, mounting evidence suggests that profitability continues to be a challenge,” said Accenture Strategy managing director Tom Merry. This growth represents an almost tripling of their customer base in a year. But while their growth rate of 150 per cent dwarfs the one and two per cent recorded by incumbent and traditional challenger banks respectively, their pace of expansion is slowing.  UK digital banks near 20m customers – but growth slows The chief executives of digital lenders (L-R) Revolut, N26 and Monzo (Getty Images for TechCrunch,) Also Read: UK digital banks near 20m customers – but growth slows center_img While the total valuation of the lenders included in the analysis now stands at £9bn, most have struggled to generate revenues. While their average income per customer increased from £4 in 2018 to £9 last year, this remains far behind the almost £270 per customer generated by incumbents.  Tags: FinTech “There are still stark challenges that need to be addressed and the current mismatch between sky-high valuations and profitability is becoming increasingly clear,” said Merry. “While a buoyant fundraising market has been able to support them so far, this has yet to be tested in tougher conditions.” The chief executives of digital lenders (L-R) Revolut, N26 and Monzo (Getty Images for TechCrunch,) Show Comments ▼ The report, which covers nine digital first or digital only banks founded within the past decade, said that digital lenders need to demonstrate they could translate rapid customer acquisition into income.  Anna Menin by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeBleacherBreaker4 Sisters Take The Same Picture For 40 Years. Don’t Cry When You See The Last One!BleacherBreakerDaily FunnyFemale Athlete Fails You Can’t Look Away FromDaily Funnybonvoyaged.comTotal Jerks: These Stars Are Horrible People.bonvoyaged.comPost FunThe Deadliest Snakes Ever Found On The PlanetPost FunDefinitionThe Funniest Yard Signs EVER WrittenDefinitionMisterStoryWoman files for divorce after seeing this photoMisterStoryNoteableyAirport Security Couldn’t Believe These Jaw-Dropping MomentsNoteableyBeach RaiderMom Belly Keeps Growing, Doctor Sees Scan And Calls CopsBeach Raiderzenherald.comMeghan Markle Changed This Major Detail On Archies Birth Certificatezenherald.com The chief executives of digital lenders (L-R) Revolut, N26 and Monzo (Getty Images for TechCrunch,) Also Read: UK digital banks near 20m customers – but growth slows Digital banks’ customer growth rate slipped 20 per cent in the second half, while their average deposit balance also fell by a quarter from £350 to £260 per customer. last_img read more

Already low price for Alaska crude oil falls further as the world responds to coronavirus

first_imgCoronavirus | Economy | Energy & Mining | Nation & World | North SlopeAlready low price for Alaska crude oil falls further as the world responds to coronavirusMarch 12, 2020 by Abbey Collins, Alaska Public Media Share:An above-ground section of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System near the Toolik Lake Research Station in the North Slope Borough. (Photo by Rashah McChesney/Alaska’s Energy Desk)Oil prices are way down. The price of U.S. and global benchmarks are both below $40 per barrel.Alaska North Slope crude is in the $30 range. In the last 20 years, it’s only been that low a few times. From 2000-2004, in 2008, and in late 2015-2016.The COVID-19 pandemic is driving some of the recent decline. But prices were low even before the outbreak.Larry Persily is a former federal pipeline coordinator in Alaska. He says the drop comes down to supply and demand.“It’s pretty much basic economics,” Persily said. “More oil out there, and buyers are thinking ‘hey it’s going to be cheaper tomorrow, and next week and next month and if you don’t want my $34 today, heck, I’ll get it for $32 tomorrow.’ It’s not a good situation.”Persily says reduced demand has been a problem for a while, and there are many factors at play. A big one: China’s economy weakened, and with it, demand.And then came a global health emergency.“The coronavirus outbreak came, demand in China went down, the world economy is contracting as people are producing less, flying less, manufacturing less,” Persily said.So, already low demand has been pushed even lower.Russia and the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, or OPEC, met recently and tried to help balance global supply and demand. But, Persily says they were unsuccessful and now, to add to existing uncertainty, he says we’re seeing an oil price war.In recent years, the price of Alaska North Slope Crude has been reliably higher than the U.S. benchmark, West Texas Intermediate. That also has to do with supply and demand. Alaska oil competes with foreign exports, rather than West Texas. Persily says different markets have different channels of supply and demand.“2018, 2019, there was a period there where Alaska oil was worth $10 per barrel more than Texas,” Persily said. “Of late, we’re back to the $2 or $3 bump as was historical practice. Because global demand was weakening, global prices were going down, and Alaska rode it down with them.”That’s why right now, the two commodities are much closer in price, and that price is low.The big question now is: how far will oil prices drop and how long will they stay so low?“We’ll get out of this and oil will start climbing, I think during this year certainly back into the $40s, maybe the $50s,” Persily said. “A lot will depend on the economy and how bad the coronavirus outbreak gets around the world.”If oil prices don’t bounce back, it could mean more trouble for Alaska’s oil-dependent economy. Oil companies are screening employees for fever before flying them up to Alaska’s North SlopeShare this story:last_img read more

Eurozone gets a lift from factory sector growth

first_imgMonday 2 February 2015 8:29 pm whatsapp Share Show Comments ▼ A SPARK of good news emerged from the Eurozone’s manufacturers yesterday, while separate data from the UK showed British factories enjoying economic growth.The latest purchasing managers’ index (PMI), compiled by Markit, showed that the Eurozone manufacturing sector’s rate of growth rose by 0.4 percentage points in January, to 51. Any figure above 50 indicates growth. The PMI improved to a six-month high in January, from 50.6 in December and 50.1 in November. The UK’s manufacturing PMI climbed to 53 from December’s 52.7. It was boosted by growth in output and new orders.Disappointingly, increased growth in Spain, the Netherlands and Germany was offset by miserable stats from Greece, where the sector’s rate of contraction accelerated from 49.3 to 48.3 points, a 15-month low.Howard Archer, an economist at IHS Global Insight, said we could be seeing the effects of low oil prices and a depleted euro.“This suggests that very low oil prices and the markedly weaker euro may just be starting to feed through to help Eurozone manufacturers, although there is still a long way to go before the sector is out of the woods. Furthermore, the European Central Bank’s stimulative measures should increasingly help matters, notably including the substantial quantitative easing programme [unveiled in January],” Archer said. by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMaternity WeekA Letter From The Devil Written By A Possessed Nun In 1676 Has Been TranslatedMaternity WeekMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailElite HeraldExperts Discover Girl Born From Two Different SpeciesElite HeraldGive It LoveRemember These Rare Sisters? See Them NowGive It Lovezenherald.comMeghan Markle Changed This Major Detail On Archies Birth Certificatezenherald.comBeverly Hills MDPlastic Surgeon Explains: “Doing This Every Morning Can Snap Back Sagging Skin” (No Creams Needed)Beverly Hills MDNoteableyKirstie Alley Is So Skinny Now And Looks Like A BarbieNoteableyEquity MirrorThey Drained Niagara Falls — They Weren’t Prepared For This Sickening DiscoveryEquity MirrorTheFashionBallAlica Schmidt Is The Most Beautiful Athlete To ExistTheFashionBall center_img More From Our Partners A ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgKamala Harris keeps list of reporters who don’t ‘understand’ her: reportnypost.com whatsapp Express KCS Eurozone gets a lift from factory sector growth Tags: Eurozonelast_img read more

Barclays profits beat expectations as executive chairman John McFarlane sets out new strategy

first_img by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeSwift VerdictChrissy Metz, 39, Shows Off Massive Weight Loss In Fierce New PhotoSwift VerdictMaternity WeekA Letter From The Devil Written By A Possessed Nun In 1676 Has Been TranslatedMaternity WeekPost FunKate & Meghan Are Very Different Mothers, These Photos Prove ItPost Funzenherald.comMeghan Markle Changed This Major Detail On Archies Birth Certificatezenherald.comEquity MirrorThey Drained Niagara Falls — They Weren’t Prepared For This Sickening DiscoveryEquity MirrorArticles SkillHusband Leaves Wife For Her Sister, Not Knowing She Won The Lottery Just Moments BeforeArticles SkillTaonga: The Island FarmThe Most Relaxing Farm Game of 2021. No InstallTaonga: The Island FarmTotal PastThis Was Found Hiding In An Oil Painting – Take A Closer LookTotal PastPast Factory4 Sisters Take The Same Picture For 40 Years. Don’t Cry When You See The Last One!Past Factory Show Comments ▼ Catherine Neilan whatsapp Barclays’ share price climbed more than 2.3 per cent this morning having beaten expectations for second quarter profits, with net income rising to £1.85bn – ahead of the £1.8bn expected – as chairman John McFarlane set out his three point plan to strengthen the bank.The figuresTotal income rose to £6.55bn in the three months to the end of June up from £6.4bn in the previous quarter, while adjusted pre-tax profits stood at £1.85bn. Operating expenses were down slightly to just below £3.9bn for the quarter.  For the first half, adjusted pre-tax profits were up 11 per cent to £3.7bn, which Barclays said reflected “improvements in all core operating businesses”. Additional provisions of £800m have been made for ongoing investigations and litigations, taking the total put aside for the forex scandal to £2.05bn.  On top of that, a further £850m has been put aside to deal with claims over missold PPI. Total operating expenses for the half dropped three per cent to £7.74bn “reflecting savings from strategic cost programmes, principally in the investment bank”. Why it’s interestingIt’s been just over a fortnight since John “Mac the Knife” McFarlane ousted Antony Jenkins, followed a week later by the surprise exit of Sir Mike Rake.   While the bank is showing signs of progress, it’s clear that McFarlane is impatient to get Barclays back in a stronger position as soon as possible. The ex-Aviva boss has taken on the reins as executive chairman and so will be able to steer the business as he sees fit.  However there are still concerns around parts of the business – it was the most visited by UK watchdogs last year, for example –  and with no chief executive expected to join until the end of the year at least it will be interesting to watch how performance continues in coming quarters.  What Barclays saidMcFarlane has made it clear he will ramp up the turnaround plan, saying although he was pleased with the progress so far there was “a lot we can do to accelerate our progress”.  “Barclays today has a good portfolio of businesses,” he said. “However, we need to accelerate the execution of the strategy. There is more that can be done to deliver better returns for shareholders, faster, and that work has begun under three group priorities which I have established since becoming executive chairman earlier this month.” These are “to deliver on our strategy, with increased focus on our core franchise”; to “accelerate the delivery of shareholder value” and “instill a high performance ethic and process across the Group, underpinned by an enhanced values driven culture”. In shortMcFarlane is setting out his plans for a stronger Barclays, having already achieved above-expectations profits.  Wednesday 29 July 2015 9:33 am Share whatsapp Barclays profits beat expectations as executive chairman John McFarlane sets out new strategy Tags: Barclays Company John McFarlane Peoplelast_img read more

Premium / On the wires: Ceva sinks, DSV struggles, DHL & DB Schenker surge through choppy waters

Please Login Forgotten your password? Please click here “The freight forwarding sector had a tough end to 2019 after US seaborne imports fell by 7.1% year over year in Q4. Among the majors, only DB Schenker and DP-DHL saw growth with expansions of 8.7% and 1.8%, respectively, due to their reliance on European rather than Asian shipments. The big three all saw lower shipments including a 12.9% slide in volumes handled by Expeditors.” – Panjiva Research, 22 January 2020. (Emphasis in bold is mine)The great thing the growing community … Please either REGISTER or login below to continue Email* << Go back Reset By Alessandro Pasetti 24/01/2020 Premium subscriber LOGIN Email* LOGIN New Premium subscriber REGISTER Password* Reset Your Password Subscription required for Premium stories In order to view the entire article please login with a valid subscription below or register an account and subscribe to Premium read more

Digital wealth management platform enhances executive team

first_imghandshaking and exchanging contract documents bacho12345/123RF Toronto-based d1g1t Inc. announced two additions to its executive leadership team on Thursday. Dr. Andrew Aziz and Kian Rafia will join the enterprise wealth management platform as executive vice president, business development and managing director, head of U.S. distribution, respectively.  IE Staff PenderFund names new SVP for investments CETFA elects new board leader Keywords Appointments The move is part of the startup’s plan to strengthen its leadership team in order to continue building on sales growth and market momentum as it expands into the U.S., d1g1t said in a release. Aziz brings more than 20 years of experience working in the financial services industry, most recently  as senior vice president, global head of financial risk analytics at IHS Markit. Rafia joins d1g1t from Morningstar where he served as EVP, head of advisor solutions. Rafia has more than 22 years of experience in various roles within the wealth management industry.  Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Facebook LinkedIn Twitter TD getting new head of private wealth, financial planning Related newslast_img read more

‘Living Lab’ showcases circular economy concept to construction industry

first_img‘Living Lab’ showcases circular economy concept to construction industry Curtin University has launched the Legacy Living Lab (L3), a modular building designed using principles of the circular economy – an environmentally friendly economic concept that aims to design out waste by including as much recycling and re-use of materials as possible.Curtin researchers Timothy O’Grady, Professor Greg Morrison and Roberto Minunno outside of the Legacy Living Lab (L3). Constructed as part of their thesis, Curtin University Sustainability Policy Institute PhD candidates Timothy O’Grady and Roberto Minunno, together with Curtin Professor Greg Morrison, worked alongside many industry partners to create L3 as a resource to support and inform the building industry on different construction methodologies, test new products and review the performance of materials, including their energy consumption, automation, and effects on building wellness.Mr O’Grady said L3, located at Development WA’s East Village development in Knutsford, Fremantle, was designed to be flexible, sustainable, and can be fully disassembled, and that many of the building’s materials were recycled, including the original 100 year-old Jarrah staircase from the Dingo Flour Mill and carpet tiles reclaimed from a Perth CBD office space.“In Australia, the construction industry is responsible for about 30 per cent or 20.4 million tonnes of annual waste. Although it’s a significant and largely ignored issue, this is also an opportunity,” Mr O’Grady said.“The circular economy concept sits at the heart of the L3’s design and construction and reduces waste by incorporating many fortuitous finds and generous donations, giving real meaning to the phrase ‘one person’s trash is another’s treasure’.“The 17 tonne steel frames we used to construct L3 actually came from a project that went bankrupt, and were originally destined to be recycled. We were able to redesign L3 to incorporate these frames, putting them to good use.“The carpet is from a near-new office space on St George’s Terrace in Perth that was being renovated and it was due to be thrown away before we repurposed it. It’s secured with a double-sided contact pad, rather than glue, meaning it can potentially even be reused again in the future.“We were also able to find a home for the beautiful Jarrah staircase from the Dingo Flour Mill in Fremantle, bringing a piece of local history to L3, and importantly saving it from going to waste.”Other environmentally-friendly features of L3 include the outdoor balcony, made from recycled tyre rubber and plastics; the acoustic ceiling panels, which are 68 per cent recycled PET bottles and other plastic materials; and the kitchen benchtop, made from pressed recycled timber. L3 also features solar panels, an on-site electric vehicle charger, and incorporates water balancing features.L3 co-creator Mr Roberto Minunno said in addition to the physical waste created by the construction industry, it was also important to consider the amount of CO2 emissions emitted during building projects.“In the specific example of L3, a traditional build of this size would have created about 50 tonnes of CO2 emissions, whereas the modular Living Lab build only created 5 tonnes of CO2 emissions – a huge benefit for the environment,” Mr Minunno said.“A non-modular build would normally have a concrete foundation or slab, but L3 is built using a steel micro-pile footing system, consisting of a series of steel poles that are skewed in to the ground at specific angles, to anchor the building.“This alone saved 20 tonnes of concrete, compared to 800 kilograms of steel – which, unlike concrete, can be recycled.”Professor Greg Morrison, also from the Curtin University Sustainability Policy Institute, said that because L3 is modular, it can be relocated – potentially multiple times – which helps it last even longer.“On average, the lifespan of buildings in Australia is 20 years, but L3 is designed to last for at least 50 years,” Professor Morrison said.“Once it finally reaches its end of life, around 57 percent of L3 can be deconstructed and reused in other buildings, 25 per cent of it can be recycled, and 18 per cent disposed of.“L3 is currently a Curtin University building, used primarily as a space for industry demonstration and a place to carry out important research on new building and material concepts.”DevelopmentWA CEO Frank Marra said the State Government’s central development agency was excited to be supporting the ambitious project through $100,000 of funding and a three-year lease.“DevelopmentWA is committed to championing change in Western Australia’s housing industry by demonstrating new technologies and sustainable living initiatives,” Mr Marra said.“An Innovation through Demonstration project, East Village in Knutsford will be Fremantle’s most sustainable new development, featuring energy and water savings, renewable energy revenues for residents, and a range of homes with adaptable spaces for home offices.“L3 is revolutionary in the way it will bring together industry, researchers and the community to shape and create the future of living.“Research undertaken here into precinct-scale sustainability initiatives will help inform best-practice design for future housing developments that we undertake.”Industry partners for the Legacy Living Lab (L3) project include Acoufelt, Armstrong Flooring, BGC, Bluescope Steel, Brajkovich Demolition, Curtin University, Delos, Development WA, Enware, Fleetwood Australia, Forest One, Infinite Energy, Intelligent Home, Interface, ITI – Innovative Timber Ideas, Jason Windows, Ludlow Timber Products, Metforce Balustrades, Met-tech imaging, OP Properties, Proform, Quantify Technology, RWC – Reliance Worldwide Corporation, Schneider Electric, Somfy, Stramit, Verosol, and Weathertex.For more information visit here. For video visit here. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:armstrong, Australia, Curtin University, demonstration, Dingo, electric vehicle, environment, Fremantle, Government, Perth, renewable energy, St George, sustainability, sustainable, university, WA, Western Australialast_img read more

MHRA pilots patient involvement in new applications

first_imgMHRA pilots patient involvement in new applications From today, when new applications for selected medicines (new active substances and new indications) are received, the applicant company will be asked for evidence on the patient involvement activities they undertook when developing their product. For clinical trials, whilst additional information won’t be requested at this early exploratory stage of the pilot, the MHRA will be documenting in medical assessment reports if there is evidence of patient involvement in clinical trial applications in order to better understand the current scope of activities.In considering how patient involvement is integrated into the approvals process, the MHRA hopes to learn from any patient-related activities that take place during development, and use this knowledge to improve the quality of clinical drug development and health outcomes in the future.During the pilot, the information provided by the applicants will be voluntary and will not alter the outcome of their application. However, in future, the Agency hopes that a successful pilot will lead to patient involvement playing a greater role in the final assessment process, when clinical trials are approved, or medicines are licensed.Dr June Raine, MHRA Chief Executive, comments:Patients are at the heart of everything we do. Gathering this information will help us gain a better understanding of the current landscape and give us important insight into the valuable work being done across our innovative life sciences sector.I’m excited for the opportunity to learn more so that we can work together to shape the future of effective patient involvement and better outcomes for all.Professor Matt Westmore, HRA Chief Executive, adds:The HRA welcomes this initiative from the MHRA to ensure that new medicines are developed in partnership with patients. It complements our own work to support and encourage everyone involved in the development of clinical trials to work with patients beyond just recruiting them as participants.This is crucial to ensure that studies are relevant, important and acceptable to take part in, so that high quality research can improve people’s health and wellbeing. It is also more fundamentally just the right way to do research – it is about patient voice and patient power in the system.The Agency will undertake a detailed analysis of the evidence submitted.This crucial patient-focused pilot supports the ambitious vision of The Future of UK Clinical Research Delivery, launched today. As a partner, the MHRA is proud to be part of strengthening and contributing to this project. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:clinical trials, drug development, future, Government, heart, outcomes, participants, pilots, Professor, project, quality, research, trial, UK, UK Government, voice, wellbeinglast_img read more

Council endorses Carisbrook Recreation Reserve designs

first_imgCouncil endorses Carisbrook Recreation Reserve designs The Carisbrook Recreation Reserve project has moved a step closer with revised designs endorsed at a Meeting of Council this week (27/04).The revised Carisbrook Recreation Reserve Master Plan and revised Bowls Club pavilion Plans were endorsed, along with the Floor Plans for the Carisbrook Recreation Reserve.Central Goldfields Shire Tullaroop Ward Councillor Anna de Villiers said it was exciting to see the project move to the next stage.“Identified as one of Council’s Priority Projects, as well as a key project in Council’s Recreation and Open Space Strategy 2020-29, this is a community led project that will have real benefit to our Tullaroop Ward community.“The end result will be an accessible and inclusive modern sporting facility providing dedicated change rooms for women girls and community hub for the growing population of Carisbrook and surrounding townships.“Not only will it provide recreational opportunities for our residents but for the wider community and we’ll have a dedicated facility for staging events, classes and gatherings.“I’d like to take the opportunity to congratulate all parties for their involvement to date and look forward to seeing the delivery of this project over the coming year.”In October 2018 the Victorian Government allocated $2 million for stage one of the project. A further $2,157,900 was announced in August, 2020 for stage two. Council has committed to providing $118,000 towards Stage 1 and $220,000 towards Stage 2, a total of $338,000.The Carisbrook Recreation Reserve project will be delivered in five stages:Stage One: Early Works – car parking, new vehicle entry, removal of away change rooms and a new green keepers shed (Stage One underway with completion expected by the end of August, 2021)Stage Two: Upgrades to the existing netball and tennis courts – court resurfacing and line-markingStage Three: Additional bowls club enhancement worksStage Four: New additions to existing pavilion including – female friendly player and umpire change rooms and amenities, two netball change rooms and amenities, a new netball show court with lighting, multi-purpose room for events and meetings, first aid rooms, office space, feeding room, disabled car space, ramps and viewing platform.Stage Five: A bowls/community pavilion with a toilet block – a new pavilion to service bowling greens and community events, social room for events and meetings, kitchen, pavilion and public toilets and disabled car space, ramps and viewing platform /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:bathroom, car, Carisbrook, Central, Central Goldfields, Central Goldfields Shire Council, community, council, court, Government, local council, project, space, tennis, vehicle, Victoria, Wardlast_img read more

Transcript: How Nixon’s resignation changed us: impeachment 45 years later

first_img DIRK: Bickers says that, while Nixon was not impeached, the specter of being forced from office prompted him to resign.Historically, two presidents have been impeached BICKERS: And that number has really never recovered. That number dropped and it stayed low for well over a decade. Ticked up a little bit and then sagged back down. It’s there to make sure the president doesn’t abuse the powers of the presidency. DIRK: A loss in public trust is what CU Boulder political science professor Ken Bickers says is one of the lasting legacies from the Watergate scandal. BICKERS: Historically, impeachment was not viewed as a normal political tool. It was used to try to drive Andrew Johnson from the presidency.  That was the only time in a very long history of the country until we go to the Clinton period that impeachment was used in that way.” DIRK: According to the Pew Research Center, before Watergate and Richard M. Nixon’s resignation as president of the United States, American’s trust in government was above 60%.But after Watergate, it dropped a lot, to 36%. Andrew Johnson following the Civil War and Bill Clinton in the ‘90s. Bickers says using impeachment as a political tool is not what the founding fathers had in mind. NIXON: By taking this action, I hope that I will have hastened the start of that process of healing which is so desperately needed in America.LISA: And did we, as a nation, ever truly heal?To get at some of those questions, Brainwaves Dirk Martin sat down with CU Boulder political scientist Ken Bickers.BICKERS: The resignation of Richard Nixon and the scandal that led up to it – the roughly two years that the country saw an underbelly of the White House, the executive branch – that really was disturbing. It had lasting impacts. BICKERS: I think that you have to have some sort of relief valve. There has to be some mechanism so that a president can be removed. I think without that we’d have an even more imperial presidency than we have now. The threat of impeachment hanging over the head of every president creates a certain worry that they need to make sure that what they are doing would pass the test of appropriateness, probity, and those kinds of things. I think the fact that it exists is good for the Republic. I think that what’s not good is treating it as an extension of the last election. Where you didn’t like the outcome and now you think you have enough blood in the water that maybe you can impeach and maybe pull the other side over. I think that’s what happened with the Clinton impeachment. I think with Nixon there was a sense that crimes had been committed and that the president had tried to cover up those crimes. And had tried to cover them up and obstruct justice in a willful way.LISA: If you were around, and older than about grade school, in 1974, chances are, this moment is etched in your memory pretty vividly. Brainwave’s Dirk Martin spoke with a few of you on the pearl street mall about what you recall most and how it still resonates today.Person # 1: “I just remember that it was happening and Mr. Nixon got caught doing things he wasn’t supposed to be doing. I imagine it opened some people’s eyes to what was going on in Washington. How things, you know, back then see how bad they were and then we look at what’s going on there today and the dysfunctionality and how things are just screwed up.”Person # 2: “Well, I think you had a bi-partisan effort to be able to uphold  justice. That doesn’t  seem to be existing today.”Question: “Can you find any parallels between with what went on back then and with what’s happening now in D.C.?”Person # 2 answer: I can in terms of nefarious activities, for sure. In terms of solutions and terms of holding people accountable, I cannot.”Person # 3: “I think it hurt his party a lot, for sure. It made people question things. I think Watergate was a relatively minor blip compared to what we are doing right now. I think right now it’s just an attack on democracy.”LISA: Contrary to popular belief, Nixon was not impeached. His resignation came just days after the house judiciary committee recommended three articles of impeachment against him. But by stepping down himself, he put an end to the  possibility of formally being removed from office. Fast forward to today and, rightly or wrongly, talk of impeachment of a sitting president is in the news again.To get more into what exactly impeachment is, and how it’s been used over time, Brainwaves Paul Beique checked in with political scientist, former CU Boulder conservative scholar, and senior scholar in residence at the Benson Center for the Study of Western Civilization, William B. Allen.PAUL: Where were you in 1974 when the Nixon resignation occurred? ALLEN: I was teaching at Harvey Mudd College and Claremont Graduate School in California during the time of the Nixon hearings and his eventual resignation.PAUL: And what were you thinking at that time as you saw those events unfold?ALLEN: A number of things on several levels. First of all, the impeachment question itself. There seemed to be no doubt but that there was justification for the impeachment. At the same time, it was evident that it’s a very high bar and there’s no guarantee that impeachment is going to succeed. In much more obvious cases such as Andrew Johnson’s, it had not, but in this case, it seemed the weight of the evidence was so strong that it accomplished the purpose of the political process by inducing the resignation.PAUL: That brings me to my next question. The Founding Fathers, what was their intention when they put the process of impeachment in the Constitution?ALLEN: Well, their intention was, of course, what we would obviously think. You could always have an unforeseen occasion in which someone betrays the country, whether through treason, which is the first cause of impeachment listed, or through just sheer corruption or criminality. And a free people ought to be able to rid themselves of it without having to resort to bloodshed or revolution. So, their intention was to provide civil means for solving extraordinary political problems.PAUL: Do you think that we will be able to use impeachment as intended as we go forward, or is everything so partisan now that that might be impossible?ALLEN: Nothing has changed from the beginning. And one of the first impeachment trials was that of Justice Chase of the Supreme Court, who was essentially tried for political reasons because the Congress disagreed with him. At least the House of Representatives disagreed with an opinion that he rendered. It did not succeed in the Senate. And it failed. The impeachment of Andrew Johnson seemed to have stronger grounds because Johnson was literally refusing to enforce laws that Congress had passed.  Nevertheless, that impeachment also failed when it reached the high bar of the Senate, so that what we can see today is that we haven’t essentially changed. The Constitution writers did something very important. They open the door to give full vent to public outrage at the same time as preventing it to be so easy to overturn the institutions of government that instability would be the only government we would know.And so it’s hard to consummate completing the impeachment, relatively easy to launch one. And that combination is meant to be matter or factor of political health in the country. PAUL: And that might be roughly where we are today. There’s a lot of talk in the House of Representatives about starting impeachment proceedings, but it has to go through the Senate where would almost certainly fail. What is your view of the situation as we see it now?I think you summarized it aptly. We can revert mere 20 years, not quite, to the Clinton impeachment hearings, and we can see the same scenario unfolding. Now, you did have, of course, actual allegations in the Clinton case that you don’t have here. You have false constructions here and not actual allegations, but nevertheless you have the same heightened partisanship, and you have the same high bar in the Senate, and so the most important thing about the current atmosphere is a question whether pushing impeachment in the House of Representatives will be down to the injury of the party that pushes it. That’s the most important question at the present moment. PAUL: So, it makes even an appropriate use of impeachment proceedings quite difficult. ALLEN:  Well, certainly, but remember, as I said, the Constitution writers made impeachment easy to launch and difficult to complete, and so you can essentially say you can impeach for any reason or no reason, and that’s all it takes to make it appropriate. It is not as if there is some actual crime that has been committed. It’s simply that the passion calls for impeachment. So that is appropriate. That is what the Constitution is open to. But the Constitution does not permit us to be overrun by passion. Therefore, they make it difficult to complete it, and that’s where we find ourselves now. The question is: will the people who are seized with passion, will they carry their passion to the point of wanting to make a demonstration, even though they cannot produce a concrete result? And that will determine how far the reaction to the expression of the passion would actually harm them.PAUL: Is there anything that we have not discussed today that you think is important for our listeners to know or understand about this process?ALLEN: Yes, I think it’s really important for people to understand now the discussion of impeachment in any given political historical era is an integral part of the political process. It is not an outgrowth or a cancer or something that is out of the ordinary. We’ve had many threats of impeachment in the course of our history, and sometimes our political disputes are of such a nature that we revert to the conversation of impeachment when we run out of the real capacity for mutual deliberation. So that the impeachment discussion is only the other side of the coin of the polarization discussion in our politics. Where there is not much room for mutual deliberation, there is going to be much more digging in trenches and hurling of bombs, and that’s what impeachment is about. PAUL: Professor Allen, thank you so much for joining us today on Brainwaves.ALLEN: Thank you. Glad to be with you.LISA: Next week on Brainwave: using drones to measure tornadoes, and other high and low tech ways we’re prepping for natural disasters.I’m Lisa Marshall.This episode of Brainwaves was produced by Dirk Martin, Paul Beique and our executive producer Andrew Sorensen.Sam Linnerooth is our digital producer.Andres Belton and Cole Hemstreet created our intro.See you next time on Brainwaves. BICKERS: One of the numbers that political scientists and I track is “Trust in Government.” That number dropped precipitously as the scandal deepened and with the resignation of Nixon. Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: July 30, 2019 LISA: Welcome to Brainwaves, a podcast about big ideas, produced at the University of Colorado Boulder. I’m Lisa Marshall, and this week…RICHARD NIXON: I have never been a quitter. To leave office before my term is completed is abhorrent to every instinct in my body. But as president, I must put the interest of America first. LISA: We take a look back at a moment that changed us.NIXON: Therefore, I shall resign the presidency effective at noon tomorrow.LISA: 45 years ago, on August ninth, 1974, President Richard Nixon resigned.What were some of the long-term impacts? He says in both of those cases, Congress used impeachment as a political tool. DIRK: Never to recover… BICKERS: Never, ever to the heights that it was pre-Nixon. People don’t think about government today in the way people thought about government in the 50s and 60s. Young folks don’t always assume that the government will do the right thing. That government leaders have their interest, the public’s interest at heart. That they care about people like them. But Bickers says there’s a difference between the effort to remove Nixon and what happened to Johnson and Clinton.last_img read more