Lack of offense frustrating as Ohio State womens ice hockey drops both

Ohio State junior forward Claudia Kepler (24) controls the puck during a game against Bemidji State University on Nov. 6 at the OSU Ice Rink. OSU lost 2-1. Credit: Eileen McClory | Senior Lantern ReporterThe Ohio State women’s ice hockey team is still searching for consistency after losing both games in its weekend series to Bemidji State, falling to 4-6-0 on the season.On Friday, the Buckeyes lost 2-1 despite outshooting the Beavers 22-17 in what turned out to be a stifling defensive game. Freshman forward Dana Rasmussen scored the lone goal for OSU. Senior Hannah Moher and sophomore Bailey Wright scored for the Beavers.On Saturday, the third period began tied 1-1 with the Buckeyes leading in shots 27-14. But two goals late in the third period gave Bemidji State the victory and the series sweep.“I think for the most part we controlled both the games. I thought we outplayed them for the majority of the game,” OSU coach Jenny Potter said. “I think there were just a few times that our players broke down mentally.” Bemidji State junior goaltender Brittni Mowat started both games for the Beavers, allowing just two goals on the weekend despite facing a combined 55 shots in the two games.“Bemidji has a great team, but they’re not invincible. We had plenty of scoring opportunities, plenty of chances, our team needs to learn how to bury them,” Potter said.Redshirt freshman Alex LaMere started both games in goal for the Buckeyes, turning away all but three shots on the weekend, while going through long stretches of quiet net play. With the lull in opportunities to save shots, LaMere said she just tries to stay locked in.“It’s definitely a mental game at that point, you just have to keep sharp on your edges,” LaMere said.The second game opened with the Buckeyes holding an 8-1 shot advantage, but the team believed the tempo of the game picked up considerably as it wore on. LaMere said she thinks the defense was able to keep pace with the Beavers’ attack. “Our defensive zone has come a really long way,” LaMere said. “(The skaters) stick with your girl, if we can play five-on-five that way we’ll be just fine.”LaMere expressed no frustration in having sit through a quiet first half of play before a run of fast-paced play in the final 30 minutes.“Yesterday we saw a lot of the same thing as today, it started off slower and then the pace picked up, from a goalie’s standpoint. (We) just have to keep moving and keep in the game,” LaMere said.Bemidji State entered the weekend series with one of the top ranked defenses in all of college hockey, however, OSU expressed frustration at the opportunities missed having outshot the Beavers in both games.“I guess they’re learning the hard way,” Potter said. “It can be frustrating as a coach, but it’s the learning process they’re going through.”Senior forward Kendall Curtis, who scored the lone OSU goal on Saturday, voiced her irritation with the lack of offensive results, but she said she believes in the team’s system.“Sometimes it can get frustrating, but we what want to focus on is getting new looks and how to create new offense, that was our focus,” Curtis said.Curtis’ goal was the product of strong communication and game planning with her linemates: sophomore Julianna Iafallo and junior Claudia Kepler.“We really know our roles,” Curtis said. “We know that the best way for us to operate is by playing with some giddy-up, winning battles, keeping it simple, keeping our feet moving.”Curtis, who earlier this week was named an alternate captain, said she thinks the play of her line is important to the success of the program, which is struggling to score with only 22 goals in its first 10 games.“The giddy-up we bring to the ice every shift is really important,” Curtis said. “We know that.”The Buckeyes are set to begin a five-game road swing when they travel to face North Dakota in Grand Forks for a weekend series on Nov. 14 and 15. read more

Commentary Former Lantern sports editor not sure if inner sports fan still

For nearly a year-and-a-half as the sports editor of The Lantern, I suppressed my inner sports fan out of professional obligation. Having come out the other side and attempted to rekindle my love of sports this past weekend for the first time since resigning from my post in January, I’m not sure how much of a sports fan still resides in me. The times I spent as the sports editor of The Lantern were some of the best of my life. I had the privilege of roaming sidelines and locker rooms all over America while bearing witness to the Ohio State athletic department’s many teams and student-athletes. The price of admission for this rare opportunity was shelving the sports fan in me. Upon taking the position in the summer 2011, I was all too happy to abide by that stipulation, which all sports writers must do, of course. I didn’t stop to realize what I was looking at during my editorship, but there were times when covering the OSU athletic department went far beyond the chalk on the field. In truth, the editorship was a lot like walking in on your parents having sex. By this, I mean that you also bear witness to the ugly side of things – things that are burned into your memory forever. It is the kind of stuff that is obviously taking place but you’d rather not see. In the case of the sports writer, it is the kind of thing you’d prefer not to report on or witness, but must. It is the things you read while sifting through hefty documents after Freedom of Information Act open records requests are fulfilled. It is the stories you hear about coaches and athletes being jerks when the bright lights aren’t shining their way. Of course, it is also the public relations person that argues you have misrepresented the truth about their team or their department. There is no ugly side to the true sports fan, though. Fandom, in its purest form, is innocent and unassuming. Men, women and children of all ages commit themselves to their chosen team and make an emotional investment with no promise of a return. The team’s success can be the daily metric of a fan’s happiness or despair. This can be a cruel way to live, but it’s the chosen way of life for so many. When I attempted to awaken my inner sports fan for the occasion of the OSU men’s basketball team’s game against Indiana on Sunday at the Schottenstein Center, my inner sports fan didn’t wake up. I don’t know if he ever will. With only a vague recollection of the game day rituals OSU fans partake in, I did my best to recreate an authentic fan experience. To gain admittance to the stadium, I pulled a crumbled ticket from my coat pocket and held my breath as an usher scanned the barcode – I had purchased the ticket for an exorbitant price from a scalper just five minutes earlier. This, of course, was a departure from flashing a press badge to get inside. Once inside, I didn’t have a free meal with unlimited Coca-Cola products provided for me. Rather, I had to pay for a hot dog and a pop like the other 18,808 fans in attendance. And my seat wasn’t arm’s length from the court. I was up in Section 332, Row “R,” Seat 12. It is not as posh as press row, but true fans take pride in simply being present for the big event, proximity to the playing surface aside. I even perused the souvenir shop on the lower level and wore an OSU T-shirt to the game – to the untrained eye I was just another nameless, ticket-bearing, die-hard member of Buckeye Nation. This die-hard died quickly, though, and I quickly had to concede that my experience was anything but authentic. I observed the game with the submissive silence and shifty eyes of a deadline reporter. No time or cause for cheering as far as I could see. Of course, silence in the presence of two top-10-ranked basketball teams playing in sold-out arenas was beginning to make me stick out. The media resist emotional reaction to game play, but the wild crowing and bellowing of the sports fan – let us call those reactions “fangasms” – is accepted bleacher etiquette in most stadiums. In a desperate attempt to participate and gain the approval of the people I was sitting near, I began to curse and cry out loudly during the second half of the game. Having not attended an OSU game of any kind as a fan in about a year-and-a-half, I had all but forgotten how to cheer. I was crying out at inappropriate moments, or too long after the play was over. My reactions were a forgery. I was a fraud. I was faking my fangasms. The embarrassment of my fraudulent fangasms arrived midway through the second half, and Indiana was in control of the game by that point. The Hoosiers went on to coast to an 81-68 win. I stayed until the final buzzer, but I knew I had spent each second of the 40 minutes of game action occupying a seat that would have been better suited for someone eager to twirl a Homage rally towel and root hard for OSU. If there was a way for me to realize I wasn’t fan enough anymore that didn’t involve handing a fistful of cash to a ticket scalper, surely I would have pursued that action. For all that I gained as sports editor of The Lantern, and I promise you that I gained greatly, I lost the fan in me, for now at least. Sports are my lifeblood, so shelving my fandom and my passion for sports writing simultaneously is out of the question. I suppose it is really a win-win situation because, as I did during my editorship, I’m sure to continue meeting interesting people and seeing things that true fans can only dream of seeing. There are more good days ahead. Perhaps I came into the field of sports writing too naive about how things really work. Maybe my view of sports fans is more of an idealistic hope than a reality. In any event, the path of the sports writer, and not that of the sports fan, is the path I will continue down. That is to say, I’ll stay on this path as long as I can continue to stomach a job that occasionally requires me to witness things that we don’t always want to see. read more

Sir Geoff Hurst slams Cahill and Vardy for quitting England

first_imgEngland former player and World Cup winner, Sir Geoff Hurst has criticised Jamie Vardy and Gary Cahill for their decisions to retire from international duty.Jamie Vardy and Gary Cahill were both in the England squad as they reached the semi-finals at the World Cup this summer.The duo then decided to make themselves unavailable for England in order to concentrate on club football.Even though they could still feature for England in the future, Hurst was angered by their decision. Team Talk reports.“While there’s plenty to be positive about our national side right now, I must admit I was disappointed to see Jamie Vardy and Gary Cahill choose to retire from international duty,” Hurst said.Jadon Sancho, Borussia DortmundCrouch: Liverpool could beat Man United to Jadon Sancho Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Peter Crouch wouldn’t be surprised to see Jadon Sancho end up at Liverpool one day instead of his long-term pursuers Manchester United.“I’m a firm believer that players should play for their country as long as they possibly can.“My team-mates and I would have given our last breath to continue playing for England.“I also don’t like when players say they’ll make themselves available again if there are injuries or suspensions.“In my view, if I was England manager, then I wouldn’t pick those players ever again.”last_img read more

Soon concrete roads to be constructed in New Town

first_imgKolkata: Housing Infrastructure Development Corporation (HIDCO) has proposed to set up concrete roads in New Town in phases.This will reduce the maintenance cost of the stretches which eats up a major portion of the revenue collection. The potholes and crators that have been created due to the monsoon in areas under Sector V and Nabadiganta will be repaired before the Durga Puja. A workshop to find out methods to set up roads for longer duration was held in New Town on Thursday. Senior officials of HIDCO, New Town Kolkata Development Authority (NKDA), Nabadiganta Industrial Township Authority (NDITA) attended the workshop along with engineers and experts in road construction. There are 200km roads in New Town while Sector V has another 25 kilometers road. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeThe experts said that while constructing concrete roads, the upper layer should be covered with a thin layer of tar. This would help the cars to move smoothly and reduce the level of environmental pollution as well. The experts suggested that for the good health of the roads, the cracks that are more than 3 mm deep should be repaired immediately. Representatives of a start-up company said they would provide vehicles fitted with CCTV cameras which will help them to detect the cracks. The specially-designed vehicles will move around in New Town. There will a central monitoring system. Once the cracks are detected, the road repairing agencies will be informed through the monitoring system. HIDCO will ask the firm to do a pilot study and on the basis of the report, subsequent steps will be taken. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedEmphasis will also be given on visual improvement. HIDCO has taken up elaborate measures to increase the green cover in the area. Tall tree nurseries have been set up and with the state Forest Department, massive plantation of saplings have been done. Saplings were given to NGOs and individual owners and cooperatives looking after housing complexes during the Forest Week. The roadside trees are being watered daily with recycled water with the help of specially designed vehicles.last_img read more

Reliving memories through art

first_imgOpenings windows to their imaginings of a reality that is unconventional and far removed from everyday trials, a group of artist have up with an artshow .Titled ‘Tales of Yore’, the month-long exhibition has invited artists, sculptors and satirists including K G Subramanyan, Shanti Dave, Jogen Chowdhary, Manu Parekh, K S Radhakrishnan, Arpana Caur, Sanjay Bhattacharya, to name a few, and will go until February 28 Every work of art displayed is a passage its creator travels to tell a story, to make newer discoveries of visions gifted by time and its many paradigms. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfViewers can see the conflict between flawless time and the raw innocence of imagination which is best captured by the forever pursuits of quizzing minds that artists epitomise. One of the artist Sandeep Jingdung has tried to reflect the experiences of his birth place Assam through his art work. From its flora and fauna, childhood memories to his love for natural surroundings, he has tried to infuse everything on the canvas beautifully. On the other hand, K S Radhakrishnan with his sculptures attempts to give a reflection of history, memory loss and his deep engagement with the world. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveApart from nature and childhood memories, artists have also tried to depict different cultural aspects, imaginary characters and a lot more. Based on mythology, Jayasri Burman’s artworks have a lyrical quality, decorative designs and elements of folk idiom. Whereas, Arpana’s work are feminine in context. Female figures emerge as symbols of solidarity. Internationally acclaimed artist Jogen Chowdhury has also displayed his works in the exhibition. Based on the memories, thoughts, dream and his immediate environment, the work is the combination of satire and anger, and real with imaginary in a fine sensibility and technique used by him.last_img read more