Federer beats Djokovic to win seventh Dubai title

first_imgDefending champion Roger Federer won his seventh Dubai Championships title and second of the year in defeating top-ranked Novak Djokovic 6-3, 7-5 on Saturday.This marked the seventh consecutive year – 11th time in 13 years – that Federer or Djokovic won this title. The only other tournaments Federer won seven times are Wimbledon, and Halle, Germany, both on grass.”Ever since I won here the first time, I fell in love with the tournament,” Federer said. “The seventh is quite unbelievable. It sounds pretty crazy to me.”Federer, who has 84 career titles, won in Brisbane, Australia, in January.”He deserved it,” Djokovic said. “I expected that from him.”I knew he was going to chip and charge, come to the net, serve and volley.”The 5,000-seat stadium was sold out, but many more people were standing around at the top. They were treated to a high-caliber match. Federer needed five more aces to become just the fourth player since 1991 to serve 9,000 career aces. He served 12 in the final.He joined Goran Ivanisevic (10,183), Ivo Karlovic (9,375), and Andy Roddick (9,074) in cracking the 9,000 aces mark.”I even remember which one it was because I was counting them,” Federer said. “It was one of the swinger wides.”It’s nice to get past that so I don’t have to think about it ever again, or until the next thousand or so.”Federer saved all seven break points he faced, while Djokovic lost both break points he faced. Djokovic sailed a backhand long on break point in the eighth game of the first set.advertisementIn the second set, Djokovic had a 40-0 lead in the 11th game, but watched Federer rebound to break his serve with an inside out forehand crosscourt winner.”The first set belonged to me, but the second set belonged to him more, really,” Federer said. “It was a huge game at 5-all, 40-love for him.”I crawled my way back into that game and ended up breaking him,” Federer added. “That was big but the break points I saved were even bigger.”last_img read more

What Can the Astros Do to Compete with the Red Sox Going

first_img 00:00 /06:57 Listen To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: David J. Phillip/APBoston Red Sox catcher Christian Vazquez holds the championship trophy after Game 5 of the World Series on Sunday, Oct. 28, in Los Angeles.center_img X Share The World Series ended last night with the Boston Red Sox defeating the Los Angeles Dodgers in Game 5, to take the series 4-1.Now, with the season over, what can the Astros do to get back to baseball’s promised land and to compete with the Red Sox going forward? Jesus Ortiz is a senior editor for La Vida Baseball and a former Astros beat writer. In the audio above, he tells Houston Matters host Craig Cohen he thinks the Astros are in good shape to contend for several more years.And Ortiz discusses the historic win by Boston manager (and former Astros coach) Alex Cora, who became the first Puerto Rican to manage a team to a World Series title.last_img read more

ADA Marylands Fabulous YOU Luncheon

first_imgADA Maryland’s Fabulous YOU! luncheon will celebrate the successes of the second cohort of women who completed Fabulous YOU! — a year-long, interactive learning experience designed to address diabetes management for women who are living with or are at high-risk for diabetes. The gala luncheon at Baltimore’s Horseshoe Casino, on Nov. 10, from noon to 2 p.m., will highlight the successes of the women in the second year of the program and feature keynote speaker Carmel Roques, CEO of Keswick, as well as speeches from program participants past and present. The afternoon will close with interactive wellness activities, including hula-hooping, massages, nail bars and more. For more information please call ADA at 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383) or visit www.diabetes.org.last_img read more

Why This Collaborative Platform for Musicians Is Drumming Up Big Bucks

first_imgJanuary 16, 2015 Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals This story appears in the January 2015 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe » 4 min read Steve Martocci’s goal for Splice is nothing less than to change the course of music creation. “We think we can lead an entire new movement in music,” he says. Splice allows musicians to create, share and store their work digitally with unprecedented ease. The music platform is compatible with popular digital audio workstations such as Ableton, Logic Pro and FL Studio, with others in the works.“We’re trying to allow artists to create fearlessly and never worry about backup, losing their work or missing files when they’re sending things to people,” says Martocci, a tech and startup veteran who previously co-founded the messaging platform GroupMe. “They just get to focus on making their music.” Add in a community angle that allows aspiring musicians to play with tunes, isolating tracks and creating remixes, and Splice has the makings of an online musical playground. New York-based Martocci sold GroupMe to Skype in 2011 for a figure reported between $43 million and $85 million. (He declined to comment.) He met his Splice co-founder, Santa Monica, Calif.-based software architect Matt Aimonetti, at a 2012 entrepreneurship conference. They were united in their belief that the digital creation process for music was stuck in the ’90s. “Matt was an audio engineer for half his life. I’m a huge music fan,” Martocci says. “If you sit at this apex of music and code, you wonder why these concepts of connected creation and easy collaboration don’t exist for music.”“One of the first discussions we had was about seeing the DNA of music,” Aimonetti adds. “So much of it is black box. I’m obsessed with exposing the creative aspect.” Martocci and Aimonetti (who previously worked with LivingSocial and Sony PlayStation) launched Splice in October 2013 with $2.75 million in seed funding. The company raised an additional $4.5 million last year in Series A funding, led by Palo Alto, Calif.-based True Ventures. That round also included investments from New York-based Union Square Ventures, as well as some music-industry heavyweights, including superstar DJs Tiësto and Swedish House Mafia’s Steve Angello; Justin Bieber’s manager, Scooter Braun; and the William Morris Endeavor Entertainment talent agency.True Ventures principal Adam D’Augelli was impressed with Splice’s founders and the platform’s easy integration for musicians. “They were highly focused and executed well—they built the first version of the product themselves while gathering market and potential customer feedback in a few weeks,” D’Augelli says. “We were excited about their tight focus on building a platform that didn’t require any changes in work flow but, rather, [supported] artists in the way they currently worked.”The investments from the music industry are “a big piece of validation,” Martocci adds. “When you show [Splice] to an artist, their eyes light up. It’s going to make my life easier to get this in front of the forward-thinkers in music.”The capital will go toward further developing and fine-tuning the product. “We’re making sure we’re solid on the platform and adding things as we go,” Martocci says. “We just need to make [Splice] so good and strong that musicians share it and we create value for them.”Splice was in private beta for 10 months before switching to a free public beta in mid-September. The site will maintain a free tier, but Martocci says it will migrate slowly toward charging for additional features. “We’re constantly building a backlog of the amazing things we think we can offer for premium services from the education side, the professional producers’ side,” he says. “It’s endless.”  Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Register Now »last_img read more