A Guy at the Libertarian Convention Did a Striptease on Live TV

first_imgProbably NSFW: The Libertarian Party chose former New Mexico Governor GARY JOHNSON to be their presidential nominee over the weekend.  He was also their candidate in 2012.But a chunky dude with a big red beard named James Weeks stole the show.  He was running to be the party chairman as a joke.  And instead of giving a speech when he bowed out on Sunday, he did a STRIPTEASE on live TV.(Profanity Warning!  Search for “James Weeks Strips at Libertarian Party National Convention.”  He starts dancing at :30 . . . stripping at 1:20 . . . and says he’s dropping out at 2:48.  WARNING!!!  There’s some uncensored profanity.)last_img read more

Sasol: 100% synthetic jet fuel

first_imgA Fischer-Tropsch slurry phase reactor at Sasol. (Image: Emerson Process Management) Janine ErasmusSouth African fuel producer Sasol has become the first company in the world to gain approval from international aviation authorities for use of its fully synthetic jet fuel in commercial airliners. Sasol produces its fuels from coal and natural gas and is the world’s only commercial user of the proprietary coal to liquids (CTL) process used to make the jet fuel.Sasol CTL, as it is known, underwent a testing process that spanned several years before getting the green light from aviation fuel specification authorities. Among these are the British Ministry of Defence, which is responsible for Def Stan (Defence Standard) 91-91 – this governs the requirements for kerosene jet fuel. Other stakeholders – including engine and airframe manufacturers, airlines, relevant oil companies, and bodies such as the International Air Transport Association – were also part of the approval processSasol CE Pat Davies says, “Approval by the international aviation fuel authorities recognises the absolute need to develop aviation fuel from feedstocks other than crude oil in order to meet the world’s growing needs.”For almost a decade Sasol has provided jet fuel that consists partly of a CTL component and partly of kerosene derived from crude oil.Sasol CTL has now been officially classed as Jet A-1 fuel, which is fuel for jet and turbo-prop-engined aircraft. Jet A is the standard aviation fuel in the United States and is only available there, while Jet A-1, which is similar but has a lower freezing point, is sanctioned for use elsewhere in the world.In the US, ASTM International, formerly known as the American Society for Testing and Materials, publishes the ASTM D1655 specification for aviation turbine fuels. It is expected that the latest version of the standard will include the Sasol CTL synthetic jet fuel. ASTM International is one of the largest voluntary standards development organisations in the world.Helping the environmentTests have shown that emissions from Sasol’s jet fuels are lower than those of similar fuel derived from coal, because of the lower sulphur content. This has positive implications for the environment.The technology also signifies a move away from the use of crude oil as a fuel source. Alternative fuels are the subject of intensive research because of the high cost of crude, and Sasol’s technology can be applied not only to coal but also to gas and biomass. In the context of energy sources biomass refers most often to plant material, but can equally apply to material of animal origin. Either way, it is carbon-based.Countries with high reserves of coal and natural gas will be able to turn these reserves into valuable income using Sasol’s environmentally benign technology. According to Sasol the world has proven coal reserves of an estimated 985-billion tons, with the largest known reserves being in the US, Russia, China, India, Australia, Germany and South Africa. Sasol plans to make its unique technology available internationally.While current approval only applies to jet fuel produced at Sasol’s Secunda, Mpumalanga, plant, the company intends submitting applications for approval for its Oryx GTL (gas to liquid) plant in Qatar and its GTL plant in Nigeria. The latter is a joint venture with Chevron, parent company of Caltex.In addition, Sasol is considering potential CTL ventures in the US, China and India which will also fall under the approval process. Its partner in India will be the Tata Group.Converting coal to liquid energyThe coal to liquids process involves three stages. In the gasification stage the coal is turned into raw gas, which is then purified into a synthesis gas for the next stage. The second stage involves a process known as Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The conversion takes place in a unique low-temperature Fischer-Tropsch Slurry Phase Reactor developed by Sasol, which can produce between 2 500 and 17 000 barrels per day. Here the synthesis gas is converted into heavy hydrocarbons in the presence of a catalyst, typically based on iron and cobalt.Finally, the products of stage two are upgraded depending on the final product required – these range from automotive and aviation fuels and waxes to high-grade lubricants. Upgrades include various chemical processes, as well as refining through a conventional petroleum refinery.Sasol has stated that it has the strategic intent to be a world leader in Fischer-Tropsch chemistry.Reducing South Africa’s dependence on crudeSasol was established in 1950 to protect South Africa, which does not have its own crude oil reserves, from incurring heavy costs due to increasing crude oil imports. Major milestones in the company’s history include the production of its first automotive fuel in 1955, and the establishment in 1990 of its first international marketing company, Sasol Chemicals Europe. This paved the way for Sasol’s extensive globalisation programme.Today Sasol has operations in more than 20 countries and exports its products to more than 100. In addition to its CTL evaluations in China, India and the US, the company is currently working with the South African government on exploring the feasibility of an 80 000 barrels-per-day facility in South Africa.Related articlesSasol’s massive BEE deal Sasol: making liquid fuel from coal Useful linksSasolAviation fuelsASTM InternationalOryx GTLSasol ChevronInternational Air Transport Associationlast_img read more

The sky is not the limit for African astronaut Mandla Maseko

first_imgAstronaut Mandla Maseko will feature in the next instalment of Brand South Africa’s Play Your Part TV series, to be aired on Sunday 20 July at 9pm on SABC2. Maseko won the global Axe Apollo Space Academy competition for an hour long sub-orbital trip of 62 miles, or about 100 kilometres. Handpicked for the trip on the Lynx Mark II Spaceship, Maseko is one of only 23 civilians from around the world to win a seat on the space mission. He saw off a million other entrants to emerge victorious. (Image: Sthe Shabangu)• Brand South Africa+27 11 483 0122info@brandsouthafrica.com• South Africa takes to space • Ubuntu coming to phones• Blast-off for space weather centre • Ubuntu beats Windows and Mac • From township to space, the world’s first black African astronautMelissa Jane CookIt is an extraordinary dream come true. Like music to Mandla Maseko’s ears, this part-time DJ will blast off into space, literally. No-one in Maseko’s family has ever stepped outside South Africa, but now the 25-year-old is preparing to rocket into space in 2015.Maseko won the global Axe Apollo Space Academy competition for an hour long sub-orbital trip of 62 miles, or about 100 kilometres. Handpicked for the trip on the Lynx Mark II Spaceship, Maseko is one of only 23 civilians from around the world to win a seat on the space mission. He saw off a million other entrants to emerge victorious.The son of a toolmaker and a cleaning supervisor, he hails from the dusty Mabopane Township near Pretoria. He will be the first black African, and the only other South African besides billionaire Mark Shuttleworth to have gone into space. Shuttleworth is a white entrepreneur and philanthropist who bought a seat on a Russian Soyuz capsule for £12-million and spent eight days on board the International Space Station in 2002.“Excitement does not begin to describe how I feel right now,” Maseko told the Pretoria News daily. “If there was a better word than ‘excitement’ I would use it.” He was forced to put his civil engineering studies on hold because he could not pay the fees; now will get to experience zero gravity and a journey that normally comes with a $100 000 price tag.He heard the news of his achievement on 5 December 2013, only a few hours after the death of Nelson Mandela. “I have run the race and completed the course, now here is the torch,” Maseko imagined Mandela would have said to him. “Continue running the race and here’s the title to go with it.”Watch Mandla Maseko discussing his once in a lifetime opportunity:Entering the competitionIn August 2013, Maseko was lying on the couch when he heard an advertisement for the competition on the radio and decided to enter, along with thousands of other South Africans. “I needed to send in a picture of myself jumping off something. I jumped off the wall in the backyard. I had to do it three times before I was happy with the picture.” His motivation for entering, he said was because he wanted “to defy the laws of gravity”.Hopefuls from more than 105 countries competed for a spot on the shuttle. Only 30 entrants from South Africa were selected from a field of 85 000 determined individuals for the first set of challenges in Free State; they were cut down to three, who went to the US for further gruelling preparations. Maseko was among them – one black, one white, one of Indian origin. “We wanted to show South Africa is way past the colour of our skin. We are the human race.”From December 1 to 8, Maseko and fellow South Africans Dean Roddan and Haroon Osman faced arduous challenges at the Kennedy Space Center in Orlando, Florida. This would test their resolve, strength and courage.While at the Axe Apollo Space Academy, Maseko engaged in a series of missions that gave all recruits a taste of the thrills and trials faced by real astronauts. Among training missions, he learned to pilot an Air Combat USA aircraft and braced himself for the strength of blast off in a G-Force Simulator at the Kennedy Space Centre Visitor Complex.Other challenges included skydiving, building and launching a rocket and conquering obstacle courses. “Unfortunately we could not get our rocket to launch, but we made up points because we were judged on bravery, enthusiasm and teamwork,” Maseko said. “We face things head on. I knew I had to learn, master and excel at the challenges, so I did.”Buzz Aldrin, the second man to walk on the moon, was one of the competition’s judges, and Maseko got the opportunity to meet Aldrin when he was announced a winner. “I got to shake his hand three times. I was like, ‘Oh, is this you?’ He said, ‘Yes, it is me!’” For Maseko, the encounter was magical. “This is how it feels to be out in space,” he thought.Aldrin is among 12 people – all American, all men and all white – to have walked on the moon. But Africa has growing space ambitions: the majority of the Square Kilometre Array, the world’s biggest and most powerful radio telescope, will be spread across South Africa and eight other countries on the continent.Watch Mandla Maseko discussing Space Jump Suits:Destined for greatnessHe was a “typical ekasi township boy” who still lived at home with his parents and four siblings, said Maseko. His father, who grew up in such poverty that he got his first pair of shoes when he was 16, was determined that his children would never go hungry. “I don’t remember going to bed without having eaten,” he said. “My dad provided for us. He is my hero, and then Nelson Mandela comes after.“I’m not trying to make this a race thing but us blacks grew up dreaming to a certain stage. You dreamed of being a policeman or a lawyer, but you knew you wouldn’t get as far as pilot or astronaut. Then I went to space camp and I thought, ‘I can actually be an astronaut.’”But he had known since he was a boy that he was destined for greatness. “We were not brought up to believe we can be bigger than big, but I always knew I would be.” His mom, Ouma Maseko, agreed: “When I was pregnant with him in 1988, I knew I would give birth to a star,” she said.The young Maseko’s imagination was fired by the science fiction series Star Trek and films such as Armageddon and Apollo 13. “I thought, that looks fun. No matter what life throws at you, you can use it and come out on top. If you get lemons, you must make lemon juice… My life has taken a total turn and this is my big break. People will be telling their children and grandchildren that I was the first black South African youth in space.”Plans for the futureDuring the long wait before his trip, Maseko hopes to complete his civil engineering qualification. One day when he had money, he said, he wanted to pay for the education of a child from his area. This humble boy has been offered a gigantic launch pad and the ability to defy the laws of physical and political gravity. His long-term plans are to study aeronautical engineering and qualify as a space mission specialist with the ultimate dream of planting the South African flag on the moon.“South Africa has come a long way. We have reached a stage where we are equal and we are one. This year is the 20th anniversary of democracy and what better way to celebrate than sending the first black South African into space?”The idea of making history when South Africa celebrates 20 years of democracy, appeals to him. “The vision of all youths here in Mabopane is to drive a taxi, do drugs or work on houses. It’s good to be a solution to your township rather than a problem. I want to break that system and this is a nice way to go down in history. I believe that will motivate me. The sky is not the limit.”Derek Hanekom, the minister of science and technology at the time – he became tourism minister in May this year – saw Maseko as a role model for “the future generation of space professionals and enthusiasts”. His experience could not have come at a better time than “when Africa is gearing up its space ambitions” as host to the world’s biggest and most powerful radio astronomy telescope, said Hanekom.The director of that project, Bernie Fanaroff, also hailed Maseko as an ambassador for science. “Anything that raises the profile of science up there must be good because it brings to the attention of young people what they can achieve in science and engineering.”It is a big responsibility, but the last word must go to the spaceman himself: “I have had to learn so much about astronomy and space to teach others. It’s been a dream, a lifetime dream come true, and I don’t want to stop here. When I come back, I want to become an astronaut and I will work hard to get there,” he said.last_img read more

Oklahoma Simplified Remote Seller Registration Open

first_imgThe Oklahoma Tax Commission alerts remote sellers that simplified remote seller registration is now available. Retailers making a certain level of Oklahoma sales must now remit sales tax to the Commission, regardless of physical presence in the state. This change is the result of economic nexus thresholds that recently took effect. (TAXDAY, 2018/04/12, S.20; TAXDAY, 2018/04/13, S.18; TAXDAY, 2018/09/07, S.12)Simplified Remote Seller RegistrationRemote sellers seeking to register in order to comply with the state’s new economic nexus requirements can:– go to OkTAP at oktap.tax.ok.gov/OkTAP/Web,– click “Register,” and– click “NEW-Remote Seller Registration.”Remote sellers can register for Oklahoma and other Streamlined Sales and Use Tax (SST) Agreement states via the SST Registration System at sstregister.org.Press Release, Oklahoma Tax Commission, October 15, 2018; Twitter, October 15, 2018, 12:37 p.m., twitter.com/oktaxcommissionLogin to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img read more

Beat the January blues at Bett 2017

first_imgWelcome back! For most people, January means grey weather, new exercise regimes, and fat-free, fun-free diets. To those of us in the world of education, however, January offers a spark of edtech excitement. Europe’s biggest education technology fair is back for its 21st appearance at London’s ExCel centre from 25 to 28 January. We’ll be there as always – this year on stand C210 – to meet over 44,000 like-minded teachers, students, leaders, techies, makers, coders and thinkers.Bett 2017 looks set to be fantastic, with superstar chef Heston Blumenthal and education guru Sir Ken Robinson already confirmed for keynote talks.This year we’re positioned right next to the main Bett arena, and we’ll be hosting events throughout the week to show off the latest and best technology that you can incorporate into your own classrooms.On Thursday 26 January, Intel will be leading a School Leaders Summit discussion, Taking a 360 Degree Look at Student Learning, with a panel of our five*  Intel® Education Visionaries to discuss how to build a meaningful 360-degree learning experience. The focus will be on how to unlock the power of personalizing the student experience, using technology and data to connect educators and students.We’ll also be co-hosting three sessions at the STEAM Village. On the Wednesday, Yorick Schetgen from our IOT Innovators and Makers division will be presenting the Makeblock, a learning platform that uses robots to teach engineering skills to young people aged 6-13. Look out for his talk at 12:00 called Creative physical programming at school with Makeblock Mbot.The following day, get hands-on at the circuit petting zoo. Derek Runberg from Sparkfun will introduce the Arduino 101 Inventor’s Kit and show you how you can take it into your classroom, all in under an hour, starting at 14:45. The kit is designed to help embed concepts of mathematics, motion, computational thinking, computer science, and engineering into your STEAM programme.And if you’re feeling lucky, there are also chances to win some great prizes. At Intel’s stand, take our 360 learning tour for a chance to win a 2 in 1 with Intel Inside – we’re giving away one each day. The drawings will be held at 16:00 on 25, 26 and 27 January so make sure you stick around. We’d also recommend stopping by the Making and Coding area of our stand to receive a free USB drive with over 20 UK Makers lesson plans and projects.Finally, on Friday 27th, spend your lunch break getting to know the CTCprogram. More formally known as Creative Technologies in the Classroom from Arduino, it includes learning materials and over 20 hands-on projects for students starting at age 13 and above that introduces basic concepts in programming, electronics, and mechanics in an approachable, playful way. Already a hit in Spain, Sweden and Ecuador, the program has now been opened up to teachers around the globe. Head down at 13:15 to find out more.So if you’re visiting Bett, these quick, informative, and fun sessions will give you something to take back into your classroom.As well as the one-off sessions, our stand C210 will be open for the duration of the event. Here you can meet some of our Intel Education Visionaries – educators who are leading the way in the creative use of classroom technology. You can also get to grips with Intel-powered devices from laptops, tablets and 2-in-1s to robots and Lego, as well as a range of hardware and software from our industry partners and four ed-tech startups from our Intel® Education Accelerator programme.But what if you can’t make it? As always, you can follow us on social media, where we’ll be bringing you live updates from all the key talks, demos, announcements, and performances, as well as nightly recaps of all the day’s action. Twitter is the most frequently updated, but you can also keep abreast of the action on Facebook.See you there.*Visionaries for School Leader Panel:Gareth Shaw, ICT Leader and Educator, UK, Northern Ireland Ballyclare High SchoolAmanda Hayward, ICT Coordinator, UK, England ICT in SchoolsSimon Wing, Educator, UK, England Montgomery Primary SchoolIan Phillips, IT Director, UK, The Haberdashers’ Aske’s Boys’ SchoolDonna Teuber, Innovation Program Designer, USA, Richland School District Two, South Carolinalast_img read more

Cabinet Approves Merger of NYS and NCYD

first_imgCabinet has approved the merger of the National Youth Service (NYS) and the National Centre for Youth Development (NCYD), a move that is expected to increase the budget of both agencies to a total of $561 million.Minister of Youth and Culture, Hon. Lisa Hanna, who made the disclosure while contributing to the 2013/14 Sectoral Debate in the House of Representatives on June 18, said 62 per cent of the expected budget will be allocated to projects that will impact an estimated 21,000 youth directly.She noted that the joining of the agencies is also aimed at reducing the overlap and duplication of work, as well as administration costs.“The truth is that when we got into office we found that the NYS had departed from its core mission and objectives,” Miss Hanna said.She said that unfortunately, the NYS’ sole role had become the placing of young persons in ‘internships’ at a range of state organisations, with the intention that they would, at the end, be assessed and achieve certification from HEART/NTA.“The reality is that only 20 per cent of these participants achieved certification, and less than five per cent of them were retained in the jobs they were placed in,” she said.She noted that over the last few years, she has been working to ensure that the NYS sought to fulfill its existing commitments, while reviewing its strategic focus to encourage among young people, the spirit of voluntarism and civic pride.Among the core objectives of the NYS is the creation of opportunities for self sustainability among youth; the preparation of youth for transition to employment and entrepreneurship; the creation of lessons and opportunities for voluntarism; being a catalyst for fostering of respect; and building social skills, a positive attitude, civic pride, a sense of responsibility and good citizenship among youth.The NCYD was established in 2000 as the Government department with responsibility for young people aged 15 to 24 years. It is responsible for facilitating the co-ordination and integration of programmes, service and activities geared towards youth development, and recommending and designing programmes to enhance and propel youth development.Contact: Athaliah Reynolds-Bakerlast_img read more

Gov’t Committed to Working with Voluntary Sector – PM

first_imgStory Highlights He said that Jamaica is at a critical juncture in its history where “all hands are needed” to take the country to “where we know we can go”. Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Andrew Holness, says the Government is committed to working with the voluntary sector in shaping the future of the country. “We need these kinds of partnerships to leverage the incredible talents and skills… and resources. We need this to make Jamaica a better place,” he said. “Volunteerism is an important part of national development,” the Prime Minister added. Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Andrew Holness, says the Government is committed to working with the voluntary sector in shaping the future of the country.He said that Jamaica is at a critical juncture in its history where “all hands are needed” to take the country to “where we know we can go”.He noted that strong partnerships involving Governments, private sector and the voluntary sector are the things that are needed right across the region.“We need these kinds of partnerships to leverage the incredible talents and skills… and resources. We need this to make Jamaica a better place,” he said. “Volunteerism is an important part of national development,” the Prime Minister added.He was addressing the opening of the Kiwanis Eastern Canada and the Caribbean’s three-day Convention at the Montego Bay Convention Centre, St. James, on May 17.Emphasising the role of the voluntary sector, Mr. Holness said that hardly anything of significance can be accomplished without its support.“Not because it is a philanthropic endeavour; not because it is voluntary… that doesn’t mean that it is free. What it means is that someone chooses to absorb the cost so that those who are in need can benefit. It is the ultimate expression of selflessness,” he pointed out.The Prime Minister noted that the Kiwanis Club has mastered the art of volunteerism, leaving an indelible mark on societies across the world.He said the organisation’s commitment to service is being felt throughout the length and breadth of Jamaica, especially in social and community-related programmes.Mr. Holness said it would be impossible to put a value on what the Kiwanis Club has managed to do over the years in Jamaica, noting that “the millions of lives that you have touched has not gone unnoticed”.“I would have seen basic schools… infant schools being repaired. I would have seen the health fairs and the number of students being assisted with scholarships,” he noted.The Prime Minister further cited the valuable leadership training provided from as early as primary school through the Kiwanis Builders Club, and in high school through the Key Club.“You have given opportunities to our people in both social and human capital development,” he said.last_img read more

Devastated employees and struggling Canadian content Behind the scenes of Shomis shutdown

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Advertisement “Hey Shomis,” said Shomi general manager David Asch. That jingle marked the start of every team meeting at the jointly-owned Rogers-Shaw streaming service, but former Shomi employee Cassandra James, noted something different in his voice that afternoon.“It was almost like he told us that our pet had died,” she remembered. She strolls into our meeting with her hands in the front pocket of her hoodie. After she reaches across the table to shake my hand, she recalls the day she found out that Shomi was shutting down.“I actually left. There’s this thing with my anxiety that I don’t like people witnessing my emotions,” said James. She left the room immediately after hearing the news and headed to the washroom to wipe away the tears and splash cold water on her face. Upon leaving, she noticed several colleagues lined up outside the bathroom for what she presumed to be the same reason.If content rules, Netflix is King At this point, Shomi had been operational for two years and was the first English-language streaming service to launch in Canada after Neftlix. Login/Register With: Advertisement Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

NCPCR will conduct survey to find out reasons behind child abuse

first_imgNew Delhi: What is the reason behind child abuse? To find out the answer, the National Commission for Protection of Child Rights (NCPCR) will conduct a survey in the country including Delhi. The child rights body is developing an online system through which they can easily avail the report of cases related to crime against children from different stakeholders.According to NCPCR, whether pornographic is the reason or drug addiction led to the crime all these factors will be taken into consideration during the survey. According to sources in the recently held meeting among the senior officials of the child rights body a decision was taken to conduct the survey. “Our main aim is to know why children being assaulted and also the reason behind the increase in the cases. We will also create awareness regarding the laws meant for the safety of minor children,” said an official. Also Read – Bangla Sahib Gurudwara bans use of all types of plastic itemsThe survey will also focus on proper registration of the cases. Commission had found that in some cases the victim child did not inform his or her family regarding the crime. Sharing one such incident a member told Millennium Post that a girl studying in 10th class informed them about the incident of sexual abuse happened with her at the relative’s house. “She reported the case through POCSO e-box and told us not share the information with her family members,” said official adding that after rigorous follow-up from the commission an FIR got registered in the case against the accused who was girl’s relative. Yashwant Jain member from NCPCR told this newspaper that they are putting their all-round efforts in ensuring the safety of children. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murderThe commission is also developing an online system through which they can easily get the report of the case from different agencies like the police. “Earlier we used to write to different stakeholders about the status report in the case and then they used to send the report. It was the lendy process now with the help of online platform the concerned authority will send us the report,” said an official. Priyank Kanoongo chairperson NCPCR confirmed the news regarding the online platform.last_img read more

India UNSC reform most important yet stagnating process

first_imgUnited Nations: The reform of the UN Security Council has been the most important and yet stagnating processes of the General Assembly, India said calling for action towards early reform of the UN organ that rightfully accords a “central and leading” role to Africa to ensure the Council reflects the world of today and not of 1945. Addressing a high-level plenary meeting to commemorate the International Day of Multilateralism and Diplomacy for Peace here on Wednesday, Sanjay Rana, Director General of the UN Division Government of India, emphasised that multilateralism is in crisis today, at a time when the world needs it the most. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM'”Like every crisis, this crisis in multilateralism, presents an opportunity for all of us to reinvigorate our efforts. We should redouble our efforts not only in preserving what we have achieved but also in reinventing it as we move forward,” he said. Rana said the “reform of the peace and security pillar of the UN, i.e, the Security Council has perhaps been the most important and yet stagnating processes of the General Assembly”. The international community must take action towards early reform “so that Africa is given a central and leading role in an internationally formed new order especially in a reformed and expanded Security Council and so that the Council reflects the world of today and not of 1945,” he added. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&KRana said this is essential to enable nations to effectively deal with the myriad of new challenges and threats facing the world today but also to do justice to the young generation who will inherit the fruits of our action or inaction. He noted that the conversation on multilateralism has not been easy and will continue to be challenging in the future as well but the international community will need to commit itself at every step of this process.last_img read more