Marshfield boys swimming knocks off Wausau East

first_imgTigers even WVC record at 2-2By Paul LeckerSports ReporterMARSHFIELD — The Marshfield boys swimming team evened its Wisconsin Valley Conference dual meet record with a 92-77 victory over Wausau East on Monday at the Marshfield High School Fieldhouse.Marshfield (2-2 Wisconsin Valley Conference) won two of the relays and also had a pair of individual victories.The 200 medley relay of Brian Engel, Scott Thompson, Michael Kruse, and Colin Thomasgard won in 1:56.90, and Engel, Kruse, Thomasgard, and Calden Wojt won the 200 freestyle relay in 1:42.26.Engel took first in the 100 freestyle in 55.09, and Wojt won the 50 freestyle in 25.21 seconds.Six Marshfield individuals, as well as the 400 freestyle relay team, earned second-place finishes.Marshfield will compete at the Eau Claire North Invitational on Saturday.(Hub City Times Sports Reporter Paul Lecker is also the publisher of MarshfieldAreaSports.com.)Marshfield 92, Wausau East 77Winners and Marshfield results200 medley relay: 1. Marshfield (Brian Engel, Scott Thompson, Michael Kruse, Colin Thomasgard) 1:56.90; 3. Marshfield (Gabriel Ronan, Jacob Dick, Alec Brenner, Ben Donahue) 2:12.41; 5. Marshfield (Andrew Gilkerson, Andrew Rall, Nick North, Trent Anderson) 2:25.82.200 freestyle relay: 1. Connor Rowe (WE) 2:12.54; 2. Donahue (MAR) 2:16.58; 3. Anthony Hartwig (MAR) 2:18.50; 5. Gilkerson (MAR) 2:29.73.200 IM: 1. Jeremy Meerstein (WE) 2:25.97; 2. Thompson (MAR) 2:33.22; 4. Dick (MAR) 2:35.70; 5. North (MAR) 3:02.17.50 freestyle: 1. Calden Wojt (MAR) 25.21; 3. Kruse (MAR0 25.66; 4. Thomasgard (MAR) 26.99.100 butterfly: 1. Aaron Russow (WE) 1:05.72; 2. Kruse (MAR) 1:07.27; 4. Brenner (MAR) 1:15.03.100 freestyle: 1. Engel (MAR) 55.09; 2. Donahue (MAR) 1:00.45; 4. Zach Hanson (MAR) 1:03.70.500 freestyle: 1. Jordan Straub (WE) 5:37.13; 3. Hartwig (MAR) 6:28.30; 4. Ryan McLellan (MAR) 7:47.61.200 freestyle relay: 1. Marshfield (Engel, Kruse, Thomasgard, Wojt) 1:42.26; 3. Marshfield (Hanson, Eric Tollefson, Ronan, Brenner) 1:55.57; 5. Marshfield (North, McLellan, Alex Wuethrick, Hartwig) 2:03.55.100 backstroke: 1. Straub (WE) 1:02.48; 2. Engel (MAR) 1:10.59; 3. Thomasgard (MAR) 1:12.86; 5. Wojt (MAR) 1:16.06.100 breaststroke: 1. Meerstein (WE) 1:12.16; 2. Thompson (MAR) 1:16.57; 3. Dick (MAR) 1:21.75; 5. Hanson (MAR) 1:33.32.400 freestyle relay: 1. Wausau East (Nick Schmitt, Rowe, Straub, Axel Treinen) 3:55.90; 2. Marshfield (Donahue, Hanson, Thompson, Wojt) 4:10.43; 3. Marshfield (Tollefson, Gilkerson, Hartwig, Dick) 4:37.20; 4. Marshfield (Wuethrick, McLellan, Rall, Anderson) 5:29.62.last_img read more

The sky is not the limit for African astronaut Mandla Maseko

first_imgAstronaut Mandla Maseko will feature in the next instalment of Brand South Africa’s Play Your Part TV series, to be aired on Sunday 20 July at 9pm on SABC2. Maseko won the global Axe Apollo Space Academy competition for an hour long sub-orbital trip of 62 miles, or about 100 kilometres. Handpicked for the trip on the Lynx Mark II Spaceship, Maseko is one of only 23 civilians from around the world to win a seat on the space mission. He saw off a million other entrants to emerge victorious. (Image: Sthe Shabangu)• Brand South Africa+27 11 483 0122info@brandsouthafrica.com• South Africa takes to space • Ubuntu coming to phones• Blast-off for space weather centre • Ubuntu beats Windows and Mac • From township to space, the world’s first black African astronautMelissa Jane CookIt is an extraordinary dream come true. Like music to Mandla Maseko’s ears, this part-time DJ will blast off into space, literally. No-one in Maseko’s family has ever stepped outside South Africa, but now the 25-year-old is preparing to rocket into space in 2015.Maseko won the global Axe Apollo Space Academy competition for an hour long sub-orbital trip of 62 miles, or about 100 kilometres. Handpicked for the trip on the Lynx Mark II Spaceship, Maseko is one of only 23 civilians from around the world to win a seat on the space mission. He saw off a million other entrants to emerge victorious.The son of a toolmaker and a cleaning supervisor, he hails from the dusty Mabopane Township near Pretoria. He will be the first black African, and the only other South African besides billionaire Mark Shuttleworth to have gone into space. Shuttleworth is a white entrepreneur and philanthropist who bought a seat on a Russian Soyuz capsule for £12-million and spent eight days on board the International Space Station in 2002.“Excitement does not begin to describe how I feel right now,” Maseko told the Pretoria News daily. “If there was a better word than ‘excitement’ I would use it.” He was forced to put his civil engineering studies on hold because he could not pay the fees; now will get to experience zero gravity and a journey that normally comes with a $100 000 price tag.He heard the news of his achievement on 5 December 2013, only a few hours after the death of Nelson Mandela. “I have run the race and completed the course, now here is the torch,” Maseko imagined Mandela would have said to him. “Continue running the race and here’s the title to go with it.”Watch Mandla Maseko discussing his once in a lifetime opportunity:Entering the competitionIn August 2013, Maseko was lying on the couch when he heard an advertisement for the competition on the radio and decided to enter, along with thousands of other South Africans. “I needed to send in a picture of myself jumping off something. I jumped off the wall in the backyard. I had to do it three times before I was happy with the picture.” His motivation for entering, he said was because he wanted “to defy the laws of gravity”.Hopefuls from more than 105 countries competed for a spot on the shuttle. Only 30 entrants from South Africa were selected from a field of 85 000 determined individuals for the first set of challenges in Free State; they were cut down to three, who went to the US for further gruelling preparations. Maseko was among them – one black, one white, one of Indian origin. “We wanted to show South Africa is way past the colour of our skin. We are the human race.”From December 1 to 8, Maseko and fellow South Africans Dean Roddan and Haroon Osman faced arduous challenges at the Kennedy Space Center in Orlando, Florida. This would test their resolve, strength and courage.While at the Axe Apollo Space Academy, Maseko engaged in a series of missions that gave all recruits a taste of the thrills and trials faced by real astronauts. Among training missions, he learned to pilot an Air Combat USA aircraft and braced himself for the strength of blast off in a G-Force Simulator at the Kennedy Space Centre Visitor Complex.Other challenges included skydiving, building and launching a rocket and conquering obstacle courses. “Unfortunately we could not get our rocket to launch, but we made up points because we were judged on bravery, enthusiasm and teamwork,” Maseko said. “We face things head on. I knew I had to learn, master and excel at the challenges, so I did.”Buzz Aldrin, the second man to walk on the moon, was one of the competition’s judges, and Maseko got the opportunity to meet Aldrin when he was announced a winner. “I got to shake his hand three times. I was like, ‘Oh, is this you?’ He said, ‘Yes, it is me!’” For Maseko, the encounter was magical. “This is how it feels to be out in space,” he thought.Aldrin is among 12 people – all American, all men and all white – to have walked on the moon. But Africa has growing space ambitions: the majority of the Square Kilometre Array, the world’s biggest and most powerful radio telescope, will be spread across South Africa and eight other countries on the continent.Watch Mandla Maseko discussing Space Jump Suits:Destined for greatnessHe was a “typical ekasi township boy” who still lived at home with his parents and four siblings, said Maseko. His father, who grew up in such poverty that he got his first pair of shoes when he was 16, was determined that his children would never go hungry. “I don’t remember going to bed without having eaten,” he said. “My dad provided for us. He is my hero, and then Nelson Mandela comes after.“I’m not trying to make this a race thing but us blacks grew up dreaming to a certain stage. You dreamed of being a policeman or a lawyer, but you knew you wouldn’t get as far as pilot or astronaut. Then I went to space camp and I thought, ‘I can actually be an astronaut.’”But he had known since he was a boy that he was destined for greatness. “We were not brought up to believe we can be bigger than big, but I always knew I would be.” His mom, Ouma Maseko, agreed: “When I was pregnant with him in 1988, I knew I would give birth to a star,” she said.The young Maseko’s imagination was fired by the science fiction series Star Trek and films such as Armageddon and Apollo 13. “I thought, that looks fun. No matter what life throws at you, you can use it and come out on top. If you get lemons, you must make lemon juice… My life has taken a total turn and this is my big break. People will be telling their children and grandchildren that I was the first black South African youth in space.”Plans for the futureDuring the long wait before his trip, Maseko hopes to complete his civil engineering qualification. One day when he had money, he said, he wanted to pay for the education of a child from his area. This humble boy has been offered a gigantic launch pad and the ability to defy the laws of physical and political gravity. His long-term plans are to study aeronautical engineering and qualify as a space mission specialist with the ultimate dream of planting the South African flag on the moon.“South Africa has come a long way. We have reached a stage where we are equal and we are one. This year is the 20th anniversary of democracy and what better way to celebrate than sending the first black South African into space?”The idea of making history when South Africa celebrates 20 years of democracy, appeals to him. “The vision of all youths here in Mabopane is to drive a taxi, do drugs or work on houses. It’s good to be a solution to your township rather than a problem. I want to break that system and this is a nice way to go down in history. I believe that will motivate me. The sky is not the limit.”Derek Hanekom, the minister of science and technology at the time – he became tourism minister in May this year – saw Maseko as a role model for “the future generation of space professionals and enthusiasts”. His experience could not have come at a better time than “when Africa is gearing up its space ambitions” as host to the world’s biggest and most powerful radio astronomy telescope, said Hanekom.The director of that project, Bernie Fanaroff, also hailed Maseko as an ambassador for science. “Anything that raises the profile of science up there must be good because it brings to the attention of young people what they can achieve in science and engineering.”It is a big responsibility, but the last word must go to the spaceman himself: “I have had to learn so much about astronomy and space to teach others. It’s been a dream, a lifetime dream come true, and I don’t want to stop here. When I come back, I want to become an astronaut and I will work hard to get there,” he said.last_img read more

Beading and computer programming a way out of prison

first_imgBrothers for All uses former offenders to raise funds and teach computer coding to prisoners. Cash for the initiative is raised through making bead jewellery, which is then poured into programming classes at prisons in Western Cape. Prisoners in Worcestor recently got a choice to register for a 12 month computer programming course. (Images: Facebook) Melissa JavanWhat started as a way to keep himself busy in prison is now a skill Sihle Tshabalala teaches to generate an income; the cash is used to keep a business open that allows offenders to learn computer programming. In turn, the prisoners have a marketable skill when they get out of jail.Tshabalala is a founder of the non-profitable social enterprise, Brothers for All. He took up beading while he was in prison and the skill taught him a few things, including an attention to detail. “I learned patience, persistence and precision,” he told Lead SA. “You know that if you make a mistake, you can rectify it.”Lead SA is a private sector initiative that challenges South Africans to do the right thing every day and to counter the negative perceptions about the country.After 11 years in prison, Tshabalala is now the national co-ordinator of Brothers for All. Together with his team, he makes jewellery out of beads which is sold. The income from this is used to run the initiative. One of its projects is to teach computer coding to young children and unemployed people in Langa, a township in Cape Town.His motivation is an analogy he was once told, Tshabalala says. “This man asked me if I had one rand; he also had one rand. If we exchanged the rands, what I would have, he asked. I said I would have the same rand he gave me.”“He then asked if I had an idea and he had an idea, and we exchanged our ideas, how many ideas would I have. I said two – my original idea and your idea.”Tshabalala says he feels extremely proud and happy to be contributing to a safe society and job creation. “When I was in prison I read a quote that said: ‘If you are looking for a miracle in life and you can’t find one, then be that miracle for others.’” Sihle Tshabalala made sure the skills he was taught in prison didn’t stay there – he now uses his beadwork skills to generate an income.Brothers for All launched its coding project in the Worcester Male and Worcester Female Correctional Centres on 1 May.It is an offshoot of Mothers for All, which was established in 2010 with an award-winning prisoner initiative called the Group of Hope.The principal objective of Mothers for All is to provide income-generation projects and life skills training for the caregivers of children made vulnerable or orphaned by AIDS. “By giving caregivers support and training we enable the generation of a sustainable income, benefiting both the women and the children within their care,” reads the website.“The women receive money for the products they are taught to make, which are sold both in Botswana and internationally.”Mothers for All says their work in South African prisons and the community using the Group of Hope inmates and parolees has been steadily growing.That early project enabled prisoners to change their lives through helping orphans in nearby impoverished communities. “We felt a new arm of the organisation was required to support this exciting direction.“It [Brothers for All] now also focuses on personal development, behavioural change and making safer choices in general – safe on a personal level and safe for the community. Using the perpetrators of violence to become part of the solution is inspiring many people to get involved,” reads their website.According to Brothers for All, it began by designing and delivering peer education programmes to cover HIV, sexually transmitted infections and tuberculosis in four prisons. “The work was highly successful with our results presented at XIX International Aids Conference in Washington in 2012 and the Durban Aids Conference in 2013. We also started an income generation project in the prison which has generated more than R100 000 to support local communities,” reads the organisation’s website.“While working with prisoners trying to turn their lives around, it became clear that aspirational technology skills are the only scalable way to end the cycle of poverty and crime. So in 2014, Brothers for All focused on equipping offenders, ex-offenders and vulnerable youth with aspirational technology and entrepreneurship skills.”Linda McCourt Scott, the co-founder and managing director, says Brothers for All is part of the non-profit group Mothers for All. Brothers for All was launched in 2013.“The Langa coding project started in October 2014; to date around 150 unemployed youth and learners have registered. At least half of our students are females. Six of our students, four of whom are females, have already won scholarships to Codex,” she says.Codex is a training programme that consists of an apprenticeship programme where developers do daily coding exercises, as well as talks with industry professionals and mentors. A total of 150 unemployed youth and children has registered to learn things building a website from coding.At the first class on 4 May, there were with 11 inmates – three males and eight females. “They have all enrolled in the course which will be run over the next 12 months. Part of our programme also requires that our trained students pass on the skills they have learned, so this offender group will quickly become the trainers of a new offender group.”Here is what Brothers for All tweeted on the day:Prison Coding Project begins, a first for Africa! Follow our revolutionary journey as we turn offenders into coders: pic.twitter.com/ej8uvAXnsp— Brothers for All (@brothersforall) May 1, 2015Programming skillsShe says they will learn a combination of programming languages, depending on their focus and ability. Those being taught include HTML5 and C++, Java, JavaScript, C#, PHP, Python, Ruby and SQL. “This will allow them to build websites, blogs and apps, and work in database management, among other things.”McCourt Scott says proudly: “I would like to say that there is only one other prison coding project in the world, at San Quentin in California, which started late last year.“However, this project is the first in the world that targets female offenders (most of whom are inside for economic crimes), and is the first to use ex-offenders to run the programme.”No qualifications are needed for learning computer programming, McCourt Scott says, “only proficiency in English and basic maths as well as a strong commitment to learn”.The initiative has permission to start the prison coding project in all 42 prisons in Western Cape. “The next one will probably be in Goodwood, as it is very close to our Langa centre.”Resource needsThe project has a bit of sponsorship in the form of donated computers and laptops and funding to get the project off the ground, she says. “All our students and offenders are also taught to make recycled paper bead jewellery.“This helps to bring in roughly R10 000 per month to pay for data costs, rent and travel. We urgently require a car at the moment so that we can reach more prisons, as well as additional computers, space to expand and support with our data costs,” she says.“We use a Telkom LTE modem to link up around 50 computers at our centre and use approximately R2 000 data per month.”Watch Sihle Tshabalala, a former convict talk about how he decided to make a difference with his life:Watch Mzikula Duda of Brothers for All talk about how he made a decision not to do violence against women and children:last_img read more

Freckle: Feel Good Time Tracking

first_imgWhy Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… If you work on your own or for a small company, every minute counts – especially if you’re getting paid by the hour. But still, there’s likely one task that you dread doing every day: tracking those minutes. It’s not fun. Necessary, yes, but fun? Freckle – a thoughtful and beautiful new time tracking app – would like to change that.Another Web-based time tracking app? Why would we focus on that? There are a number of features that make Freckle worth a look, but the primary reason for considering Freckle is that the team behind it is rethinking the time tracking problem. And it could be that approach which differentiates the product in a crowded market. The team behind Freckle wants to replace your dread with a time tracking app that makes you happy: “Good software is cheerful software: it behaves cheerfully, and it leaves you cheerful, too.”Part of that user happiness will come from the intuitive design and thoughtful AJAX implementation throughout the app. The thoughtful – and colorful – aesthetic should come as no surprise, given that it was put together by interface designer Amy Hoy and javascript consultant Thomas Fuchs – the same folks who brought us Twistori.The most striking part of the app is the user interface. Unlike the Web-based time tracking app I use on a regular basis, Freckle allows users to enter all of your time and categorize it without a lot of switching between typing and clicking. You can enter all of the data from the keyboard. And that saves time. Time that could be spent on other projects.Many other time tracking systems rely on a rigid set of client and category lists that – while often editable – require dropping the task at hand to add new clients, projects, and categories. With Freckle, adding these elements all happens on the fly. Adding a new category, for example, is as simple as adding a new tag. What’s more, you’re not constrained to a single category for a task. You can can categorize tasks for both client’s requirements as well as your own internal tracking needs. Yes, Freckle is simple and thoughtful – with some insightful reporting functionality to boot. But unfortunately, Freckle’s ultra-simple design lacks one feature which – for me – makes my current time tracking app invaluable: a stopwatch. With Freckle, I’m still required to figure out how much time I’ve spent on any given activity. And for someone like me, who jumps from task to task and client to client, the lack of a stopwatch is a deal breaker.And that’s unfortunate. I want to use the app. Partially because of the application, but mostly because of the team’s vision for Freckle:“We’re in this to build a sustainable business: to make truly great software, to help people add a little joy back to their daily business, and to make a living doing it.We’re not building a tasty startup snack for Google to devour, digest, and defecate.”It’s always nice to see a team with a vision – especially when that vision is accompanied by an application with a revenue model. Freckle offers several levels of paid service starting at $24 US per month for five users. Each level carries a 30-day free trial. Freckle also offers a “one user, one project” setup for free.If you’re more focused than I and capable of judging “how long you’ve spent on X,” then Freckle could very well be the answer to your time tracking needs. It’s certainly much more fun and functional than a dreary spreadsheet. To try the app and read more about the team’s vision, visit Freckle. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketcenter_img Tags:#NYT#Product Reviews#web rick turoczy 1 Related Posts last_img read more

Interview and Interrogation Training: Giving Witness Instructions

first_imgThis week’s International Association of Interviewers interview and interrogation training tip provided by Wicklander-Zulawski, has Wayne Hoover, CFI discussing giving witness instructions prior to the interview.Anybody that’s ever conducted an interview or interrogation has had the opportunity to experience a witness who is out of control. They may do things to interrupt the flow of the interview or the admission itself. Here are a few tips that are recommended to give to our witnesses:At no time are you to talk to the subject other than “hello” and “good-bye”.At no time are you to talk to me. On the outside chance that I ask you a question and I really want an answer from you, I’ll let you know.While we’re in the interview, please do not talk to yourself.At no time are you to touch the subject other than “hello” or “good-bye”.At no time are you to touch me.At no time are you to be touching yourself during the interview process.While some of these may sound a little strange, make sure that you take the time to explain these rules to the witness. You can’t assume that anybody knows and understands what the rules are.- Sponsor –  Every loss prevention investigator should continuously strive to enhance their investigative interviewing skills as part of an ongoing commitment to best-in-class interviewing performance. This includes holding ourselves to an elite standard of interview and interrogation training that is ethical, moral and legal while demanding excellence in the pursuit of the truth. The International Association of Interviewers (IAI) and Wicklander-Zulawski (WZ) provide interview and interrogation training programs and additional guidance to investigators when dealing with dishonest employees, employee theft, sexual harassment, policy violations, building rapport, pre-employment interviewing, lying, denials and obtaining a statement.By focusing on the latest information and research from experts in the field as well as academia, legal and psychological resources, these video tips provide interview and interrogation training techniques that can enhance the skill sets of professionals with backgrounds in Law Enforcement, Loss Prevention, Security, Asset Protection, Human Resources, Auditors or anyone looking to obtain the truth.To learn more about interview and interrogation training and how you can further develop your professional skill sets, please visit www.w-z.com or www.certifiedinterviewer.com for additional information. Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

Janes Addiction To Headline Rhondas Kiss Annual Concert

first_imgRhonda’s Kiss, an organization that helps cancer patients in need, announced today that legendary rock band Jane’s Addiction will perform at their annual concert event on Friday, Dec. 8 at The Hollywood Palladium in Los Angeles.Proceeds from the concert event will benefit the Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute and further the mission of Rhonda’s Kiss, supporting programs to assist cancer patients in need, and helping those who receive a cancer diagnosis make ends meet during treatment. Rhonda’s Kiss is a 501c3. To date, the charity has donated nearly $1 million to hospitals to support cancer programs and patients.“At Cedars-Sinai, it is our mission to treat the cancer patient as a whole, rather than just the disease,” said Amin Mirhadi, MD, radiation oncologist at the Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute. “We are proud to collaborate with the Rhonda’s Kiss foundation to help us achieve that.”“Raising money for cancer is a reminder that every day, people are struggling with the disease and need the support to maintain their dignity and fight,” said Kyle Stefanski, CEO of Rhonda’s Kiss. “We are blessed to have strong support from artists such as Jane’s Addiction, the public, and hospitals like Cedars-Sinai to be able to help more and more people fight this terrible disease.”Great bands break rules, but legends write their own. JANE’S ADDICTION has actually written the rule book for alternative music and culture through a combination of genre-defying classic songs and a cinematic live experience. In 1988, Jane’s Addiction would officially arrive as a pop culture force with their first proper studio album, Nothing’s Shocking. Perry Farrell stands out as one of music’s most forward-thinking and enigmatic frontmen, and his vocals soar with vibrancy, vulnerability and vitality. Guitar god Dave Navarro conjures simultaneously psychedelic and epic riffs. Stephen Perkins’ tribal stomp remains hypnotic and transfixing. The band created a sound that the world had never heard before. It was as riff heavy as it was sensitive. Farrell lyrically chronicled the stranger side of L.A. life, telling personal tales that’d stick with fans just as much as Navarro’s licks did.In 1991, for the Jane’s Addiction “farewell” tour, Farrell concocted Lollapalooza. Jane’s Addiction went on hiatus, but they never truly went away. The world needed Jane’s Addiction in 2003 just as much as it did in 1985, and the band released “Strays,” their first new album in 13 years. The first single “Just Because” was their biggest single to date landing at #1. Jane’s Addiction was once again everywhere with “Superhero” becoming the opening theme song for HBO’s hit show “Entourage” at the same time. The band headlined the re-tooled Lollapalooza festival that summer. 2016 saw the band tour their “Ritual De Lo Habitual” album in its entirety for the 25th anniversary of its release in addition to a special vinyl box set and live recording at Irvine Meadows in California.In 2014, Rhonda Stefanski was diagnosed with stage 4 pancreatic cancer. While she lost her battle, one of the greatest gifts she left was to create Rhonda’s Kiss, an event to raise money to help those in the inner city who receive a cancer diagnosis, but may be unable to make ends meet for treatment and support.Through the Rhonda’s Kiss Los Angeles event and with proceeds benefitting Cedars-Sinai, Rhonda’s Kiss events provide financial support to decrease late-stage cancer diagnosis in urban communities, and primarily for patients in financial need, by using a three-pronged approach: outreach (education, awareness and screening), navigation (medical and home) and patient services (treatment and financial assistance, and emotional support).Funds are distributed by local hospitals in areas where money is raised. For more information or to donate directly, contact: www.rhondaskiss.org.General admission tickets will be available on October 19 here.last_img read more

So many bears Draft plan says Nunavut polar bear numbers unsafe

first_imgThe Canadian PressThere are too many polar bears in parts of Nunavut and climate change hasn’t yet affected any of them, says a draft management plan from the territorial government that contradicts much of conventional scientific thinking.The proposed plan, which is to go to public hearings in Iqaluit on Tuesday, says that growing bear numbers are increasingly jeopardizing public safety and it’s time Inuit knowledge drove management policy.“Inuit believe there are now so many bears that public safety has become a major concern,” says the document, the result of four years of study and public consultation.“Public safety concerns, combined with the effects of polar bears on other species, suggest that in many Nunavut communities, the polar bear may have exceeded the co-existence threshold.”Polar bears killed two Inuit last summer.The plan leans heavily on Inuit knowledge, which yields population estimates higher than those suggested by western science for almost all of the 13 included bear populations.Scientists say only one population of bears is growing; Inuit say there are nine. Environment Canada says four populations are shrinking; Inuit say none are.The proposed plan downplays one of the scientific community’s main concerns.“Although there is growing scientific evidence linking the impacts of climate change to reduced body condition of bears and projections of population declines, no declines have currently been attributed to climate change,” it says.“(Inuit knowledge) acknowledges that polar bears are exposed to the effects of climate change, but suggests that they are adaptable.”Environment Canada’s response says that’s “not in alignment with scientific evidence.” It cites two studies suggesting the opposite.Andrew Derocher, a University of Alberta polar bear expert, is blunter.“That’s just plain wrong,” he said. “That’s been documented in many places now – not just linked to body condition but reproductive rates and survival.”The government of Nunavut declined an interview request.Its position is strongly supported by the 11 Inuit groups and hunters’ organizations that made submissions.“(Inuit knowledge) has not always been sufficiently incorporated by decision-makers,” says a document submitted by Nunavut Tunngavik Inc., the Inuit land-claim organization.“The disconnect between the sentiment in certain scientific communities and (Inuit knowledge) has been pronounced.”Pond Inlet wants to be able to kill any bear within a kilometre of the community without the animal being considered part of the town’s quota. Rankin Inlet simply wants to lower bear populations.In its submission, the Kitikmeot Regional Wildlife Board expresses frustration with how polar bears are used as an icon in the fight against climate change.“This is very frustrating for Inuit to watch … We do not have resources to touch bases with movie actors, singers and songwriters who often narrate and provide these messages,” it says.“We know what we are doing and western science and modelling has become too dominant.”The management plan doesn’t propose to increase hunting quotas immediately. It contains provisions for increased education and programs on bear safety for hunters and communities.It does say hunting bans would no longer be automatically applied to shrinking populations and that “management objectives … could include managing polar bears for a decrease.”Derocher doesn’t dispute potentially dangerous bear-human encounters are becoming more frequent. But he, and other southern scientists, insist that’s happening as climate change reduces sea ice and drives bears inland.“They will move into communities seeking food. There’s lots of attractants around northern communities.”Places where attacks have occurred are not areas with the highest bear densities, he said.The plan reflects Nunavut’s desire to control its own wildlife resources, Derocher suggested.“They don’t ask for input from southern scientists. The less input from the south is where it seems to be moving.”Derocher said the Inuit’s ability to export polar bear hides – or the ability of their hunter clients to take such items home with them – depends on whether the rest of the world trusts the animals are being well-managed.“If the stated goal is to have fewer polar bears, that may be the tripping point whereby polar bear management in Canada comes under renewed scrutiny.”Canada has fought off two international attempts to ban the trade of polar bear products.The territory’s wildlife management board will take what it hears at the public hearings and include it in a final document, which will go before the Nunavut cabinet for approval.last_img read more

What a Blue Chip Advertiser Wants From You Hint More Community

first_img1. User generated content. “The customer is in control. We need to find ways to facilitate that. User dialogue is crucial to online success and as publishers, that’s scary. Ceding control is scary.”2. Trust in ability of the audience to be self-policing. “They will bring us back to center if we let them.” 3. Peer-to-Peer Interaction. “It’s where we’re going.”4. Transparency and openness. “They can smell BS a mile away and they call you on a problem.”5. Low barriers to entry. “Offer enough choices that customers can participate and be comfortable.” 6. Collaboration. “Are we allowing customers to share ideas? We need to work with each other to solve problems.”7. Connecting. “Connect people to information. We have everything the marketplace is looking for. We have to make sure people have access to information.”8. Investment. “We have to understand we will attract people first and make money later. We don’t make a penny on Facebook but we could make a lot of money down the road. Business-to-business buyers are people and people are community-driven.” Brands are interested in becoming part of the conversation both online and in print, according to IBM vice president of marketing Edward Abrams (who stressed that doesn’t mean violating editorial autonomy but didn’t offer an example). “Magazines are important from that independent, authoritative perspective,” said Abrams, who spoke at the recent ABM Spring Meeting. “How do I get embedded in a way that’s less an advertising approach? I’m not talking about crossing the church-state line but how do we participate?” That means publishers need to approach information channels differently and in some cases, give up control. “We need to understand the customer mindset,” says Abrams. “You’ve all heard a lot about social media but what does it mean? IBM is the largest community on LinkedIn. It’s a community on Facebook. These are the types of things we are looking for you to help with. IBM great at manufacturing but not communicating. Publishers more capable. That’s the magic bullet that will differentiate the b-to-b market.”Below, Abrams highlights eight key points publishers should focus on:last_img read more

PM Hasina set to kickstart prepolls campaign

first_imgPrime minister Sheikh Hasina. File photoPrime minister Sheikh Hasina on Tuesday offered fateha at the shrines of Hazrat Shahjalal (RA), Hazrat Shah Paran (RA) and Hazrat Gazi Borhan Uddin (RA) in Sylhet city, reports news agency UNB.The prime minister arrived in the divisional headquartes on Tuesday to inaugurate different development projects as well as address a public rally, which is widely seen as beginning of her party’s pre-election campaign.Sheikh Hasina will inaugurate 14 development projects and lay the foundation stones of 24 others.Hasina, also the president of Awami League, will address the public rally on Sylhet Government Alia Madrasah ground in the afternoon.From this rally, she will begin her election campaign, almost a year before the 11th general elections scheduled to be held at the end of this year or at the beginning of the next year.The development projects Hasina will inaugurate are-a prayer room for women at Hazrat Gazi Borhan Uddin (RA) shrine, beatification of the shrine and extension of its main road up to 2 kilometres, a six-storey academic-cum-administrative building of Sylhet Government College, a building for fertiliser testing and research laboratory at Pirijpur, district office of Department of Narcotics Control, Sylhet divisional and district NSI office building, Sylhet Muktijoddha Complex Bhaban, Zakiganj upazila Muktijoddha Complex Bhaban, a 12-storey Nagar Bhaban of Sylhet City Corporation (SCC), a drainage system at Babuchhara, extension of Jalalbad road, Sylhet-Sunamganj bypass road, overlay works on Moulavibazar-Rajnagar-Fenchuganj-Sylhet road, Rashidpur-Bishwanath-Lamakazi road, Sylhet-Gopalganj-Charkhai-Zakiganj road, Darbasta-Kanaighat-Shahabagh road and Dhaka (Kanchpur)-Bhairab-Jagadishpur-Sayestaganj-Sylhet-Tamabil-Jaflang road (Sylhet-Sherpur point), pavement work at Sherpur toll plaza point on the highway, Sultanpur Union Parishad Complex Bhaban under Zakiganj upazila, Kamalbazar Union Parishad Complex Bhaban under Dakshin Surma Upazila, Kanaighat road and a three-storey primary healthcare centre at Kuituk.last_img read more

Larry Young Show Again Cited Among Best in US

first_imgLarry Young, former Maryland State Senator and current host of “The Larry Young Morning Show,” was named one of the 100 most important talk show hosts in the country by industry bible “Talkers Magazine.” His show is heard Monday through Friday on WOLB 1010 AM from 6 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. According to the magazine, Young is ranked 45 out of 100. Young was first named to the list in 2007 as number 99 and has steadily moved up the ranks year in and year out.Larry Young, former Maryland State Senator and current host of “The Larry Young Morning Show. (Courtesy Photo)last_img read more