Pep talk-Bayern playing better this season

first_img0Shares0000BERLIN, November 11-Bayern Munich coach Pep Guardiola on Monday hailed the unbeaten Bundesliga champions as playing better this season than during the same period last year.Guardiola, 43, took over from Juup Heynckes for the start of the 2013/14 season, winning the Bundesliga title with a record seven matches remaining. And the Bavarians opened up a seven-point lead at the top of the table with a 4-0 win at Eintracht Frankfurt on Saturday, and are already through to the knockout round of the Champions League with two games to spare.“The results show that we are on the right path. We’re constantly progressing and we’re playing better than last year at the same period,” said the Spaniard, whose side are on an unbeaten 17-match run in all competitions.Guardiola added: “We’re a little better because we’re playing more and we’re running less. (The players) are always mentally ready.”But the former Barcelona boss admitted that his team still don’t play as he would like and can “still improve a lot of small details”.He would also like to take advantage of the international break “to analyse what we have done well and what we can improve”.However with 27 points out of a possible 33, Bayern are two points behind their position at the same time last season and three on the previous season when Heynckes led them to the triple of — Champions League, Bundesliga and German Cup — trophies.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

How Liverpool could line up in 2017 – including highly-rated £20m-rated forward

first_img Centre-back: Joel Matip – The signing of the 25-year-old looks like one of the bargains of the summer. A free transfer from Schalke, Cameroon international Matip has slotted straight into the centre of defence, forming an impressive partnership with Dejan Lovren. 11 Jurgen Klopp will already be making plans for the January transfer window, with his eyes firmly on the Premier League title.The Reds are currently second in the Premier League, just a point behind leaders Chelsea after 13 games.But they now face their toughest test yet, after star playmaker Philippe Coutinho was ruled out of action for up to six weeks.Klopp’s side have a wealth of talent in attack and now it is time for them to step up in the Brazilian’s absence.Not only could they be without Coutinho for a while, they will also have to play without Sadio Mane for around a month. The 24-year-old, who has slotted seamlessly into Klopp’s side since joining from Southampton, will go to the Africa Cup of Nations with Senegal in January.READ MORE: Liverpool FC news: Seven ways Jurgen Klopp’s side could line up in Philippe Coutinho’s absenceRecent reports have linked Liverpool with a move for Celtic’s highly-rated Moussa Dembele, one of Europe’s most in form forwards.Some outlets suggest Klopp is so keen on the Frenchman, he has sent scouts to watch the former Fulham man on FIVE occasions, with a view to submitting a January bid.So, if Coutinho fails to make an instant comeback Mane’s Senegal reach the latter stages of the Cup of Nations and Dembele moves to Anfield, how could Liverpool line up in the second half of the season?Click the right arrow, above, to see a possible Liverpool XI in Klopp’s preferred 4-3-3 formation…See also:Brendan Rodgers on talkSPORT in November: Celtic boss says club is not interested in selling Moussa Dembele right now amid reported interestLISTEN: Liverpool are ‘an all-round scoring team’ and can cope without Philippe Coutinho, Ian Rush tells talkSPORTLiverpool FC news: Jurgen Klopp insists Reds can deal with Philippe Coutinho’s absence through injury 11 Right-back: Nathaniel Clyne – The England defender is a key man for the Reds down the right-hand side. Despite Trent Alexander-Arnold’s emergence, the former Southampton and Crystal Palace star is the first choice in his position having made it his own at Anfield in recent years. He has started all 13 of their league games this term. Forward: Divock Origi – The Belgian could get his chance to shine once Mane leaves for the Africa Cup of Nations in January. He has shown glimpses of his ability, such as a opening the scoring in the recent win over Sunderland. Will this be the making of the 21-year-old? Forward: Moussa Dembele (Celtic) – The 20-year-old has hit the ground running since moving to Parkhead on a free transfer in the summer. He has netted 17 goals in 27 appearances this term and some of Europe’s biggest clubs have already started circling. Liverpool hope to win the race for his signature by paying him four times his current £15,000 a week wage, according to Glasgow Live. 11 Goalkeeper: Loris Karius – click the right arrow, above, to see how Liverpool could line up in the second half of the season… – The German glovesman, who arrived in the summer from Jurgen Klopp’s former club Mainz, is Liverpool’s number one. He has showed his potential, but also moments of madness, with nervy handling when collecting crosses. 11 Left-back: James Milner – Klopp made a clear statement at the start of the campaign by opting to go with versatile Milner at left-back instead of Alberto Moreno. In doing so, Milner has performed extremely well and the German may be persuaded to keep him there for the rest of the season at least. The right footer positions himself well and gets forward at every opportunity. He is also their reliable penalty taker, with five from the spot this term. 11 11 Centre-back: Dejan Lovren – With Matip and Lovren at the centre of defence, Klopp may have solved Liverpool’s problems at the back. With his first choice back five of Karius, Clyne, Matip, Lovren and James Milner, the Reds have only conceded twice, according to Empire of the Kop. Lovren still has a mistake in him, but he finally looks settled on Merseyside. 11 Midfield: Jordan Henderson – The Reds captain has been one of the club’s most consistent performers this term. His passing statistics are impressive and among the best in Europe. He leads by example and has done brilliantly since taking the armband after Steven Gerrard’s departure in 2015. Midfield: Emre Can – The German has proved a key part of the midfield, recently playing his 100th game for the club. It is easy to forget he is still just 22 years old and he performs both his defensive and attacking duties well. 11 Midfield: Adam Lallana – It is fair to say the 28-year-old is one of the club’s most improved players this season. He has added goals to his game and is technically brilliant on the ball. With Philippe Coutinho injured, Lallana’s return will be a relief to Klopp and he will be vital for the rest of the campaign. 11 11 11 Forward: Roberto Firmino – The Brazilian has been preferred to Daniel Sturridge in leading the line for the Reds this season. If Dembele came in, he may have to push further out wide, but Liverpool’s front three is so interchangeable throughout 90 minutes. The 25-year-old has scored six times in 14 appearances this term and he is a vital part of the Merseysiders’ campaign.last_img read more

CSIR at the World Water Forum

first_imgThe Orange River is one of South Africa’smajor water sources. (Image: GraemeWilliams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com.For more photos, visit the image library.)Janine ErasmusThe Council for Scientific and Industrial Research will feature prominently at the World Water Forum in Istanbul this month, with a number of the organisation’s groundbreaking research projects going on show. Top South African water scientists will also take part in discussions and presentations.CSIR group executive Khungeka Njobe is excited about the organisation’s participation in the fifth edition of the World Water Forum (WWF5), particularly as South Africa is on the shortlist to host the next event.“South Africa is competing against France and Canada to host WWF6 in 2012,” she said. “We will be using this opportunity to share with the global water community our progressive legislative and policy framework and world-class research. The Department of Water Affairs is leading the bid process, but the CSIR has a critical role to play in demonstrating the country’s leadership in water research.”The host for 2012 will be announced during the forthcoming session. Should South Africa be awarded the sixth World Water Forum, it will be a major coup for the southern hemisphere, which has never had the chance to host the event. The country’s bid is centred on Durban, which has the infrastructure and facilities to host an event of this magnitude.The 2012 World Water Forum in South Africa will mean that water problems relevant to sub-Saharan Africa will come under the global spotlight, and that the Southern African Development Community region will be placed on the global water map. The event will give Africa the chance to become a valued contributor to the water-related issues of the world, rather than merely a recipient of donor aid and professional advice.Top-level representationCSIR projects on display at the Forum include acid mine drainage methodologies, human health projects, rural service delivery, and programmes focusing on water for growth and development. Many of these projects fall under the CSIR Built Environment and CSIR Natural Resources and the Environment sectors.CSIR representatives at WWF5 include engineer Dr Kevin Wall, CSIR water resources manager Marius Claassen and researcher Renias Dube. Wall is also scheduled to present a paper on South Africa’s strategy for water services asset management, and the three scientists will assist Minister of Water Affairs and Forestry Lindiwe Hendricks during the week-long event. Hendricks will host a round table involving her ministerial counterparts from around the world.The Department of Water Affairs and Forestry’s Water for Growth and Development programme, one of the projects on show in Istanbul, is in the running for the King Hassan II Great World Water Prize, one of three prestigious water-related awards up for grabs.The other two awards are the Turkish Republic Prime Minister’s Water Prize, and the Kyoto World Water Grand Prize.The King Hassan prize, worth R1-million (US$100 000), is for individuals or organisations that have made outstanding contributions in various aspects of water resources, whether scientific, economic, technical, environmental, social, institutional, cultural or political.The Kyoto prize is worth R280 000 ($28 000) and acknowledges grassroots-level activities that work towards addressing critical water needs of communities and regions. The Turkish Republic Prime Minister’s Water Prize is for journalistic excellence in the coverage of water issues. A prize of R264 000 (€20 000) each will be awarded to two journalists.Global collaboration on water problemsAccording to the World Water Council, 1.1-billion people around the world live without clean drinking water, and 2.6-billion people lack adequate sanitation. Poor access to safe water increases child mortality by up to 20 times, and in areas not served by usable water 3 900 children die every day from water-borne diseases.The World Water Forum is the largest water-related event in the world and aims to facilitate global collaboration on these critical water problems. The forum is organised by the World Water Council and takes place every three years, providing an ideal platform for policy-makers from all over the world to press for greater political commitment to and higher priority for water management strategies.The 2009 forum takes place in March in Istanbul, Turkey, after successful events in Mexico (2006), Kyoto (2003), The Hague (2000), and Marrakech (1997). This year’s theme is “Bridging Divides for Water” and is a reference to the location – Istanbul stands at the cross-roads of Europe, Asia, Middle-East and Africa – as well as the intent of providing a bridge between the developed and developing worlds.There are a number of side events associated with the main forum, among them the World Water Forum Expo and Water Fair, the Global Water Education Village, and the Youth World Water Forum.Do you have queries or comments about this article? Contact Janine Erasmus at janinee@mediaclubsouthafrica.com.Useful linksWorld Water ForumWorld Water Forum – Facebook pageWorld Water CouncilDepartment of Water Affairs and ForestryWater for Growth and Development (pdf)last_img read more

Flexibility and Job Satisfaction: Are Employers Listening?

first_imgMost employees think flexibility is critical to their job satisfaction: are employers listening?The latest SHRM Job Satisfaction and Engagement survey confirms what many in HR already know: the flexibility to balance life and work issues is important to almost every employee – with 91% of workers polled saying it was either very important (55%) or important (36%) to their job satisfaction.Yes, there were differences between the sexes – 97% of women rated it as either very important or important compared with 85% of men but even with this gap the vast majority of employees, including men, want workplace flexibility.  The same holds true when looking at the different generations – 95% of millennials rate this factor as very important/important to their job satisfaction compared with 94% of Gen Xers and 86% of baby boomers.So are companies getting the message?  Some are – 35% of employees said they were “very satisfied” with their ability to balance life and work issues in their current jobs, while 35% said they were “satisfied”. But more could be done.  The annual SHRM Employee Benefits survey report shows that most flexible work benefits are holding fairly steady with only telecommuting on an ad-hoc basis rising significantly between 2010 when 44% of employers offered this to 2014 when 54% offered it.  At the same time telecommuting on a part-time basis declined from 34% to 29%. Other research we recently did on recruiting and retaining older workers found that many of the barriers HR professionals identify in their attempts to recruit or retain older workers involve their organization’s inability to offer some aspect of workplace flexibility such as flexibility in work location, work hours or schedules. Given the aging of the workforce and the need to hold onto the best and most skilled workers as long as possible, organizations will need to find ways to overcome these barriers.  And since the job satisfaction findings show that workflex is even more important to younger generations, the progress made in increasing flexible work arrangements will improve retention across generations.HR professionals are very aware of the importance of workplace flexibility as a critical retention factor: SHRM research on leveraging benefits for retention last year found that 62% of the HR professionals surveyed said that they believed that flexible working benefits are increasing in importance in terms of their efforts to retain highly skilled employees – the top factor cited.  Their real challenge may be in convincing their organizational leaders to see it the same way. Those that are able to will position their companies for success as the job market heats up and it gets harder to recruit and retain those with the most in-demand skills.For more data findings check out Strategic Benefits–Flexible Work Arrangements (FWAs), Strategic Benefits–Leveraging Benefits to Retain Employees, Strategic Benefits–Leveraging Benefits to Recruit Employees and Strategic Benefits–Communicating Benefits.last_img read more

USDA scrubbing of animal records may have been sparked by horse lawsuit

first_imgA Tennessee Walking Horse By David GrimmFeb. 9, 2017 , 5:45 PM Pat Canova/Alamy Stock Photo It’s unclear how USDA responded to the lawsuit, but reporting by ScienceInsider suggests that the agency conducted an internal review of whether it should continue posting violations related to the Horse Protection Act and the Animal Welfare Act (which regulates the treatment of laboratory animals). Ultimately, the agency decided to keep the records up—a decision confirmed by The Washington Post, which broke the story earlier today.According to the Post, former agriculture secretary Tom Vilsack said his staff had recommended pulling the records because of fears of litigation, but he did not approve the action because he didn’t have enough time to evaluate the consequences, and because of concerns about transparency. USDA itself vaguely alluded to these actions and the lawsuit in a statement it put out on Tuesday. It reads in part: USDA scrubbing of animal records may have been sparked by horse lawsuit Mindy Patterson, The Calvary Group “The review of APHIS’ website has been ongoing, and the agency is striving to balance the need for transparency with rules protecting individual privacy. In 2016, well before the change of Administration, APHIS decided to make adjustments to the posting of regulatory records. In addition, APHIS is currently involved in litigation concerning, among other issues, information posted on the agency’s website.” During the past eight years, USDA has been infiltrated by animal rights extremists  A lawsuit over alleged cruelty to a special breed of horse appears to have prompted the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) move last week to remove thousands of reports and documents relating to animal welfare from its website. The scrubbing has outraged animal welfare advocates—and made strange bedfellows of groups that oppose and support scientific research involving animals, with both sides condemning USDA’s actions. It appears, however, that the agency’s decision had little—if anything—to do with animal research.The lawsuit, filed in February 2016, was brought in part by Lee and Mike McGartland, Texas attorneys who enter Tennessee Walking Horses in various competitions. The breed is famous for its high-stepping gait, which some animal welfare advocates have charged comes from injuring the animals, typically by adding caustic chemicals to their legs and feet—a process known as soring. The Horse Protection Act of 1970 outlawed the practice, and the law is enforced by inspectors employed by USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS).A negative APHIS inspection can disqualify a horse from competition, even before the owners or trainers can contest the findings in court. As a result, the McGartlands, who have had several horses disqualified from competition because of allegations of soring, charged APHIS with violating their due process rights. In particular, because the inspection reports are posted online and contain the names of the alleged violators, the McGartlands say that USDA has violated the federal Privacy Act, which regulates the dissemination of personal information by federal agencies. The lawsuit, filed in a federal district court in Fort Worth, Texas, asks the agency to remove any such documents from its website.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) So why did USDA change its mind? Marty Irby, the Senior Director of Rural Outreach and Equine Protection for the Humane Society of the United States in Washington, D.C., and the former president of the Tennessee Walking Horse Breeders and Exhibitors Association, says the Walking Horse community has long been putting tremendous pressure on the agency to ease its enforcement of the Horse Protection Act, and to remove violations of the act from its website. “They can’t win in the court of public opinion, so they have tried to influence legislators instead.”  The turning point, Irby believes, came when the Trump administration hired Brian Klippenstein to lead the USDA transition team. Klippenstein is the executive director of Protect the Harvest, a Columbia, Missouri–based pro-agriculture group that has supported Right to Farm bills, which protect the agriculture industry from certain lawsuits and regulations, including those involving animal welfare. The group has also opposed restrictions on large-scale dog breeding operations—sometimes referred to as “puppy mills”– which are regulated under the Animal Welfare Act. USDA’s decision to remove documents relating to violations of both the Horse Protection Act and Animal Welfare Act would be consistent with Protect the Harvest’s policy goals, Irby notes. (Multiple calls and emails to Walking Horse organizations and Protect the Harvest were not returned.)USDA’s move appears to have cheered groups that represent horse owners. “For the last eight years, USDA has been releasing confidential and un-adjudicated information to animal rights extremists and activist organizations,” Mindy Patterson, president of The Calvary Group, a Grover, Missouri–based company that lobbies against legislation it believes targets horse and dog owners, and farmers, writes in an email to ScienceInsider. “During the past eight years, USDA has been infiltrated by animal rights extremists who, with some success, attempted to change the culture within USDA-APHIS from one that is supportive of animal enterprise to one that aggressively bullies and harasses law abiding animal businesses with the ultimate goal of running them out of business.”Strange bedfellowsMeanwhile, USDA’s action has had one surprising ripple effect: Groups that support the use of animals in biomedical research have become unlikely allies of their longtime adversaries in the animal rights and welfare community. When organizations including HSUS, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, and the Animal Welfare Institute condemned the USDA scrubbing, they were joined by Speaking of Research, which defends the use of animals in scientific labs and worries that USDA’s lack of transparency could make the public think that biomedical researchers who work on animals have something to hide. Removing the records from the internet also makes it hard to keep tabs on trends in animal research, according to the Foundation for Biomedical Research, which also supports the use of laboratory animals.To combat that problem, Speaking of Research has begun uploading annual USDA reports to its website, and a website called The Memory Hole 2 says it will republish as many of the missing reports as it can, according to an article in Motherboard.“It is not enough for the scientific community to tell the public that animal research is essential; they must also provide the public with the information showing how and why animals are necessary for medical and veterinary advances,” says Tom Holder, director of Speaking of Research in London, which has staff in the United States and the United Kingdom. “Speaking of Research believes in an informed public who have as much access to the information they need to make up their mind.”*Update, 9 February, 11:21 p.m.: This story has been updated to clarify that the Foundation for Biomedical Research did not condemn USDA’s actions.last_img read more

India, not UAE, may host Pak series in December

first_imgPCB chairman Shaharyar Khan (left) discussed the upcoming India-Pakistan series with his BCCI counterpart Jagmohan Dalmiya in Kolkata on Sunday.The India-Pakistan cricket series, scheduled to be held in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in December, might after all be held in India.According to sources in the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI), the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) is not averse to sending its team to India if the circumstances don’t allow the series to be played in the UAE.And, as if to lend credibility to the talk of India hosting the series, PCB’s official broadcaster TEN Sports – which won the five-year deal in April along with Pakistan TV for a reported $150 million – said on Wednesday that it would have no objection if the series was moved out of the UAE.If Pakistan eventually tours India, the two boards will have to thrash out a formula to share revenue – an option that former BCCI president N. Srinivasan had declined a few years ago when PCB wanted to host its ‘home’ series in India.PCB chairman Shaharyar Khan, who spent four days in India seeking clearance for the series, is believed to have discussed this option among the several issues that were taken up during his meetings with BCCI president Jagmohan Dalmiya, secretary Anurag Thakur, and Union Minister Arun Jaitley, among others.”They [PCB] are ready to play in India, if that is what would be required. He [Khan] gave hints towards that during his meetings with us,” the BCCI source told Mail Today.advertisementIt is PCB’s turn to host India, but due to political reasons and opposition to its broadcaster, it may not be able to stage the matches. No high-ranking team has toured Pakistan since the attack on the Sri Lankan team in Lahore in March 2009.Since then, the PCB has opted to play all its ‘home’ series in the UAE. Now, India are scheduled to play two Tests, five One-day Internationals and two Twenty20 Internationals in December. But there is still uncertainty all around about India travelling to the UAE, where the first leg of the IPL was successfully staged last year.During his stay in India, Khan had exuded confidence of getting the government green signal for the series.Thakur, however, said on Wednesday that the government has still not cleared the tour.”Met the president of the Pakistan Cricket Board in Delhi today [Wednesday]. We discussed some issues. Dialogue has just started, much needs to be decided upon. After the two boards finalise the dates and the venues, we’ll go to the government for permission,” Thakur was quoted as saying by ANI.The alternate arrangement of India hosting the series would mean that the BCCI and the PCB will have to work out a revenue-sharing formula to the satisfaction of both parties. Also, a broadcaster will need to be chosen. BCCI’s official broadcaster is STAR Sports.BCCI has objection to PCB’s official broadcaster TEN Sports, owned by Zee, which is apparently planning a global cricket event, rivalling the ICC.But on Wednesday TEN Sports said that it would not have any objection if the series was held in India.”That would be the PCB’s decision, and being our partner we’ve to stand by them. There’s no question of a protest. In the last 12-14 years that we’ve worked with the PCB, we’ve found them very transparent, ethical and high on moral ground – always,” Rajesh Sethi, Global Head of TEN Sports and CEO Taj Television, told MAIL TODAY.When pointed out that TEN Sports stands to lose revenue if the series was not held in the UAE, Sethi said: “Absolutely…but what can I do if my board [PCB] is not hosting a series?”Sethi explained: “It works both ways. If you go into the legal arrangement and financial guarantees in place contractually, if the PCB is the host board, obviously it’ll raise an invoice on me and I’ll have to pay the rights fee. That’s how boards make money. But if a series is not held, the PCB also loses money.”qaiser.ali@mailtoday.inlast_img read more

10 months agoAndros Townsend in line for new Crystal Palace deal

first_imgAndros Townsend in line for new Crystal Palace dealby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveAndros Townsend is in line for a new deal at Crystal Palace.The Sun says Townsend will be handed a contract extension to reward his stunning form.The 27-year-old has started every Premier League game this season and scored a goal-of-the-season contender with a screamer in the win at Manchester City.Townsend has two full-seasons on his current deal but Roy Hodgson, who handed him his England debut in 2013, views him as a key player for the future.The Palace winger wants his future secured as he is pushing for an England recall after missing out on the World Cup last summer. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Cold Shot Bus Lines is extending services to Fort St John

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – In less than six months after stepping into the breach created by Greyhound’s departure on October 31, Cold Shot Bus Lines is expanding services to Fort St. John.According to Cold Shot President, Sunny Balwaria, the Company will offer a cross-border route to Dawson Creek and Fort St. John, servicing the Peace Country.“We’ve added several new features for Peace Country customers. We have a new cross-border route to Dawson Creek and Fort St. John via Grande Prairie that will take passengers and freight to those points.” Balwaria also says that Cold Shot will be offering shuttle services to important points of interest, such as airports and hospitals.“In addition, we’ve added a stop for Fort St. John passengers at Grande Prairie’s QueenElizabeth II hospital, as well as a shuttle connection to the Edmonton InternationalAirport that enables airline passengers from Fort St. John to go directly to that airport.”Cold Shot is an Alberta-owned transportation company operating since 2005.For more information, you can visit Coldshot.ca.last_img read more

Oppn unhappy with me over Indias rapid global strides Modi

first_imgTheni(TN): Prime Minister Narendra Modi launched a broadside against the Opposition Saturday, saying the DMK, Congress and their ‘mahamilavati’ friends cannot accept strides India has made and therefore were “unhappy” with him. Taking a swipe at the DMK-Congress combine, he said those who were “sworn enemies” have joined hands, despite the national party having “humiliated” its southern ally in the past. “Today India is rapidly making a mark in the world. The Congress, DMK and their mahamilavati friends cannot accept this. That is why they are unhappy with me,” he said at an election rally here. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c details The Prime Minister has been describing the opposition ‘mahagatbandhan’ (mega alliance) as ‘mahamilavati,’ meaning adulterated. Taking pot shots at DMK President MK Stalin’s proposal naming Congress chief Rahul Gandhi as Prime Ministerial candidate, Modi said there were no takers for this among the opposition “because they are in line to be PM and dream of the post.” “Some days ago, DMK supremo (Stalin) projected the Naamdar (dynast–Gandhi) as PM (candidate) but no one was ready to accept it, not even their mahamilavati friends, because they are in line to be PM and dream of the post,” he said, without naming anyone. Also Read – Tourists to be allowed in J&K from Thursday Despite past “bitterness,” the Congress and DMK have joined hands, he said and recalled that the national party had “humiliated” the southern ally earlier, apparently referring to the dismissal of the DMK government in the past. Even during the 2G spectrum allocation scam, centered around then Telecom Minster A Raja of DMK, the Dravidian party’s leaders were criticising the national party, which was leading the ruling UPA, he pointed out. “In an attempt to mislead the people, all the corrupt have ganged up in an attempt to defeat Modi,” he added.last_img read more

Lack of offense frustrating as Ohio State womens ice hockey drops both

Ohio State junior forward Claudia Kepler (24) controls the puck during a game against Bemidji State University on Nov. 6 at the OSU Ice Rink. OSU lost 2-1. Credit: Eileen McClory | Senior Lantern ReporterThe Ohio State women’s ice hockey team is still searching for consistency after losing both games in its weekend series to Bemidji State, falling to 4-6-0 on the season.On Friday, the Buckeyes lost 2-1 despite outshooting the Beavers 22-17 in what turned out to be a stifling defensive game. Freshman forward Dana Rasmussen scored the lone goal for OSU. Senior Hannah Moher and sophomore Bailey Wright scored for the Beavers.On Saturday, the third period began tied 1-1 with the Buckeyes leading in shots 27-14. But two goals late in the third period gave Bemidji State the victory and the series sweep.“I think for the most part we controlled both the games. I thought we outplayed them for the majority of the game,” OSU coach Jenny Potter said. “I think there were just a few times that our players broke down mentally.” Bemidji State junior goaltender Brittni Mowat started both games for the Beavers, allowing just two goals on the weekend despite facing a combined 55 shots in the two games.“Bemidji has a great team, but they’re not invincible. We had plenty of scoring opportunities, plenty of chances, our team needs to learn how to bury them,” Potter said.Redshirt freshman Alex LaMere started both games in goal for the Buckeyes, turning away all but three shots on the weekend, while going through long stretches of quiet net play. With the lull in opportunities to save shots, LaMere said she just tries to stay locked in.“It’s definitely a mental game at that point, you just have to keep sharp on your edges,” LaMere said.The second game opened with the Buckeyes holding an 8-1 shot advantage, but the team believed the tempo of the game picked up considerably as it wore on. LaMere said she thinks the defense was able to keep pace with the Beavers’ attack. “Our defensive zone has come a really long way,” LaMere said. “(The skaters) stick with your girl, if we can play five-on-five that way we’ll be just fine.”LaMere expressed no frustration in having sit through a quiet first half of play before a run of fast-paced play in the final 30 minutes.“Yesterday we saw a lot of the same thing as today, it started off slower and then the pace picked up, from a goalie’s standpoint. (We) just have to keep moving and keep in the game,” LaMere said.Bemidji State entered the weekend series with one of the top ranked defenses in all of college hockey, however, OSU expressed frustration at the opportunities missed having outshot the Beavers in both games.“I guess they’re learning the hard way,” Potter said. “It can be frustrating as a coach, but it’s the learning process they’re going through.”Senior forward Kendall Curtis, who scored the lone OSU goal on Saturday, voiced her irritation with the lack of offensive results, but she said she believes in the team’s system.“Sometimes it can get frustrating, but we what want to focus on is getting new looks and how to create new offense, that was our focus,” Curtis said.Curtis’ goal was the product of strong communication and game planning with her linemates: sophomore Julianna Iafallo and junior Claudia Kepler.“We really know our roles,” Curtis said. “We know that the best way for us to operate is by playing with some giddy-up, winning battles, keeping it simple, keeping our feet moving.”Curtis, who earlier this week was named an alternate captain, said she thinks the play of her line is important to the success of the program, which is struggling to score with only 22 goals in its first 10 games.“The giddy-up we bring to the ice every shift is really important,” Curtis said. “We know that.”The Buckeyes are set to begin a five-game road swing when they travel to face North Dakota in Grand Forks for a weekend series on Nov. 14 and 15. read more