10 months agoAndros Townsend in line for new Crystal Palace deal

first_imgAndros Townsend in line for new Crystal Palace dealby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveAndros Townsend is in line for a new deal at Crystal Palace.The Sun says Townsend will be handed a contract extension to reward his stunning form.The 27-year-old has started every Premier League game this season and scored a goal-of-the-season contender with a screamer in the win at Manchester City.Townsend has two full-seasons on his current deal but Roy Hodgson, who handed him his England debut in 2013, views him as a key player for the future.The Palace winger wants his future secured as he is pushing for an England recall after missing out on the World Cup last summer. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Cold Shot Bus Lines is extending services to Fort St John

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – In less than six months after stepping into the breach created by Greyhound’s departure on October 31, Cold Shot Bus Lines is expanding services to Fort St. John.According to Cold Shot President, Sunny Balwaria, the Company will offer a cross-border route to Dawson Creek and Fort St. John, servicing the Peace Country.“We’ve added several new features for Peace Country customers. We have a new cross-border route to Dawson Creek and Fort St. John via Grande Prairie that will take passengers and freight to those points.” Balwaria also says that Cold Shot will be offering shuttle services to important points of interest, such as airports and hospitals.“In addition, we’ve added a stop for Fort St. John passengers at Grande Prairie’s QueenElizabeth II hospital, as well as a shuttle connection to the Edmonton InternationalAirport that enables airline passengers from Fort St. John to go directly to that airport.”Cold Shot is an Alberta-owned transportation company operating since 2005.For more information, you can visit Coldshot.ca.last_img read more

Oppn unhappy with me over Indias rapid global strides Modi

first_imgTheni(TN): Prime Minister Narendra Modi launched a broadside against the Opposition Saturday, saying the DMK, Congress and their ‘mahamilavati’ friends cannot accept strides India has made and therefore were “unhappy” with him. Taking a swipe at the DMK-Congress combine, he said those who were “sworn enemies” have joined hands, despite the national party having “humiliated” its southern ally in the past. “Today India is rapidly making a mark in the world. The Congress, DMK and their mahamilavati friends cannot accept this. That is why they are unhappy with me,” he said at an election rally here. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c details The Prime Minister has been describing the opposition ‘mahagatbandhan’ (mega alliance) as ‘mahamilavati,’ meaning adulterated. Taking pot shots at DMK President MK Stalin’s proposal naming Congress chief Rahul Gandhi as Prime Ministerial candidate, Modi said there were no takers for this among the opposition “because they are in line to be PM and dream of the post.” “Some days ago, DMK supremo (Stalin) projected the Naamdar (dynast–Gandhi) as PM (candidate) but no one was ready to accept it, not even their mahamilavati friends, because they are in line to be PM and dream of the post,” he said, without naming anyone. Also Read – Tourists to be allowed in J&K from Thursday Despite past “bitterness,” the Congress and DMK have joined hands, he said and recalled that the national party had “humiliated” the southern ally earlier, apparently referring to the dismissal of the DMK government in the past. Even during the 2G spectrum allocation scam, centered around then Telecom Minster A Raja of DMK, the Dravidian party’s leaders were criticising the national party, which was leading the ruling UPA, he pointed out. “In an attempt to mislead the people, all the corrupt have ganged up in an attempt to defeat Modi,” he added.last_img read more

Lack of offense frustrating as Ohio State womens ice hockey drops both

Ohio State junior forward Claudia Kepler (24) controls the puck during a game against Bemidji State University on Nov. 6 at the OSU Ice Rink. OSU lost 2-1. Credit: Eileen McClory | Senior Lantern ReporterThe Ohio State women’s ice hockey team is still searching for consistency after losing both games in its weekend series to Bemidji State, falling to 4-6-0 on the season.On Friday, the Buckeyes lost 2-1 despite outshooting the Beavers 22-17 in what turned out to be a stifling defensive game. Freshman forward Dana Rasmussen scored the lone goal for OSU. Senior Hannah Moher and sophomore Bailey Wright scored for the Beavers.On Saturday, the third period began tied 1-1 with the Buckeyes leading in shots 27-14. But two goals late in the third period gave Bemidji State the victory and the series sweep.“I think for the most part we controlled both the games. I thought we outplayed them for the majority of the game,” OSU coach Jenny Potter said. “I think there were just a few times that our players broke down mentally.” Bemidji State junior goaltender Brittni Mowat started both games for the Beavers, allowing just two goals on the weekend despite facing a combined 55 shots in the two games.“Bemidji has a great team, but they’re not invincible. We had plenty of scoring opportunities, plenty of chances, our team needs to learn how to bury them,” Potter said.Redshirt freshman Alex LaMere started both games in goal for the Buckeyes, turning away all but three shots on the weekend, while going through long stretches of quiet net play. With the lull in opportunities to save shots, LaMere said she just tries to stay locked in.“It’s definitely a mental game at that point, you just have to keep sharp on your edges,” LaMere said.The second game opened with the Buckeyes holding an 8-1 shot advantage, but the team believed the tempo of the game picked up considerably as it wore on. LaMere said she thinks the defense was able to keep pace with the Beavers’ attack. “Our defensive zone has come a really long way,” LaMere said. “(The skaters) stick with your girl, if we can play five-on-five that way we’ll be just fine.”LaMere expressed no frustration in having sit through a quiet first half of play before a run of fast-paced play in the final 30 minutes.“Yesterday we saw a lot of the same thing as today, it started off slower and then the pace picked up, from a goalie’s standpoint. (We) just have to keep moving and keep in the game,” LaMere said.Bemidji State entered the weekend series with one of the top ranked defenses in all of college hockey, however, OSU expressed frustration at the opportunities missed having outshot the Beavers in both games.“I guess they’re learning the hard way,” Potter said. “It can be frustrating as a coach, but it’s the learning process they’re going through.”Senior forward Kendall Curtis, who scored the lone OSU goal on Saturday, voiced her irritation with the lack of offensive results, but she said she believes in the team’s system.“Sometimes it can get frustrating, but we what want to focus on is getting new looks and how to create new offense, that was our focus,” Curtis said.Curtis’ goal was the product of strong communication and game planning with her linemates: sophomore Julianna Iafallo and junior Claudia Kepler.“We really know our roles,” Curtis said. “We know that the best way for us to operate is by playing with some giddy-up, winning battles, keeping it simple, keeping our feet moving.”Curtis, who earlier this week was named an alternate captain, said she thinks the play of her line is important to the success of the program, which is struggling to score with only 22 goals in its first 10 games.“The giddy-up we bring to the ice every shift is really important,” Curtis said. “We know that.”The Buckeyes are set to begin a five-game road swing when they travel to face North Dakota in Grand Forks for a weekend series on Nov. 14 and 15. read more

Commentary Former Lantern sports editor not sure if inner sports fan still

For nearly a year-and-a-half as the sports editor of The Lantern, I suppressed my inner sports fan out of professional obligation. Having come out the other side and attempted to rekindle my love of sports this past weekend for the first time since resigning from my post in January, I’m not sure how much of a sports fan still resides in me. The times I spent as the sports editor of The Lantern were some of the best of my life. I had the privilege of roaming sidelines and locker rooms all over America while bearing witness to the Ohio State athletic department’s many teams and student-athletes. The price of admission for this rare opportunity was shelving the sports fan in me. Upon taking the position in the summer 2011, I was all too happy to abide by that stipulation, which all sports writers must do, of course. I didn’t stop to realize what I was looking at during my editorship, but there were times when covering the OSU athletic department went far beyond the chalk on the field. In truth, the editorship was a lot like walking in on your parents having sex. By this, I mean that you also bear witness to the ugly side of things – things that are burned into your memory forever. It is the kind of stuff that is obviously taking place but you’d rather not see. In the case of the sports writer, it is the kind of thing you’d prefer not to report on or witness, but must. It is the things you read while sifting through hefty documents after Freedom of Information Act open records requests are fulfilled. It is the stories you hear about coaches and athletes being jerks when the bright lights aren’t shining their way. Of course, it is also the public relations person that argues you have misrepresented the truth about their team or their department. There is no ugly side to the true sports fan, though. Fandom, in its purest form, is innocent and unassuming. Men, women and children of all ages commit themselves to their chosen team and make an emotional investment with no promise of a return. The team’s success can be the daily metric of a fan’s happiness or despair. This can be a cruel way to live, but it’s the chosen way of life for so many. When I attempted to awaken my inner sports fan for the occasion of the OSU men’s basketball team’s game against Indiana on Sunday at the Schottenstein Center, my inner sports fan didn’t wake up. I don’t know if he ever will. With only a vague recollection of the game day rituals OSU fans partake in, I did my best to recreate an authentic fan experience. To gain admittance to the stadium, I pulled a crumbled ticket from my coat pocket and held my breath as an usher scanned the barcode – I had purchased the ticket for an exorbitant price from a scalper just five minutes earlier. This, of course, was a departure from flashing a press badge to get inside. Once inside, I didn’t have a free meal with unlimited Coca-Cola products provided for me. Rather, I had to pay for a hot dog and a pop like the other 18,808 fans in attendance. And my seat wasn’t arm’s length from the court. I was up in Section 332, Row “R,” Seat 12. It is not as posh as press row, but true fans take pride in simply being present for the big event, proximity to the playing surface aside. I even perused the souvenir shop on the lower level and wore an OSU T-shirt to the game – to the untrained eye I was just another nameless, ticket-bearing, die-hard member of Buckeye Nation. This die-hard died quickly, though, and I quickly had to concede that my experience was anything but authentic. I observed the game with the submissive silence and shifty eyes of a deadline reporter. No time or cause for cheering as far as I could see. Of course, silence in the presence of two top-10-ranked basketball teams playing in sold-out arenas was beginning to make me stick out. The media resist emotional reaction to game play, but the wild crowing and bellowing of the sports fan – let us call those reactions “fangasms” – is accepted bleacher etiquette in most stadiums. In a desperate attempt to participate and gain the approval of the people I was sitting near, I began to curse and cry out loudly during the second half of the game. Having not attended an OSU game of any kind as a fan in about a year-and-a-half, I had all but forgotten how to cheer. I was crying out at inappropriate moments, or too long after the play was over. My reactions were a forgery. I was a fraud. I was faking my fangasms. The embarrassment of my fraudulent fangasms arrived midway through the second half, and Indiana was in control of the game by that point. The Hoosiers went on to coast to an 81-68 win. I stayed until the final buzzer, but I knew I had spent each second of the 40 minutes of game action occupying a seat that would have been better suited for someone eager to twirl a Homage rally towel and root hard for OSU. If there was a way for me to realize I wasn’t fan enough anymore that didn’t involve handing a fistful of cash to a ticket scalper, surely I would have pursued that action. For all that I gained as sports editor of The Lantern, and I promise you that I gained greatly, I lost the fan in me, for now at least. Sports are my lifeblood, so shelving my fandom and my passion for sports writing simultaneously is out of the question. I suppose it is really a win-win situation because, as I did during my editorship, I’m sure to continue meeting interesting people and seeing things that true fans can only dream of seeing. There are more good days ahead. Perhaps I came into the field of sports writing too naive about how things really work. Maybe my view of sports fans is more of an idealistic hope than a reality. In any event, the path of the sports writer, and not that of the sports fan, is the path I will continue down. That is to say, I’ll stay on this path as long as I can continue to stomach a job that occasionally requires me to witness things that we don’t always want to see. read more

LeBron James to be on sideline during Ohio State game against Wisconsin

Lebron James of the Miami Heat gives a thumbs up before a 95-88 win against the San Antonio Spurs in Game 7 of the NBA Finals at the AmericanAirlines Arena in Miami, Florida, June 20. Credit: Courtesy of MCTIn arguably its biggest game of the 2013 season to date, the Ohio State football team will hear from a fellow Ohioan and current NBA World Champion before its tilt with Wisconsin Saturday night.An OSU spokesman confirmed that Miami Heat forward LeBron James will be on the Buckeyes’ sideline during the game. The four-time NBA MVP will also address the team before kickoff according to media reports.James, a graduate of Akron St. Vincent-St. Mary, is a longtime fan of OSU, even though he never went to the school. The NBA star even has his own locker inside the newly renovated locker rooms at The Jerome Schottenstein Center.OSU men’s basketball coach Thad Matta showed his own support for the Heat star, when the new facility was released to the media. OSU was the first team to wear Nike’s LeBron line of shoes as well as have their jerseys sponsored by him in 2007.“He’s done a lot of things in his time, but I think from a standpoint we always want to pay our respects to him for what he did for us in ’07 in terms of we were the first LeBron school,” Matta said Sept. 3. “I know he’s very proud of what he does for us.”Matta was not the only person to express his gratitude for arguably the biggest star in sports.“I feel sorry that our fans won’t rally around LeBron because of the way he did his things, because for us, he’s been unbelievable,” OSU athletic director Gene Smith said Sept. 3. “He’s always kept us at the top of his thoughts when he’s doing things.”OSU is scheduled to take on Wisconsin at 8 p.m. Saturday. read more

Buckeyes offense aims to improve in red zone

Redshirt-junior tight end Nick Vannett carries the ball into the end zone during a game against Maryland on Oct. 4 in College Park, Md. OSU won, 52-24.Credit: Mark Batke / Photo editorWith all the success the Ohio State offense has had in recent weeks, there is one spot where the Buckeyes aren’t up to par: the red zone.Coach Urban Meyer said his team’s play inside the opponent’s 20-yard line simply isn’t on track with the expectations at OSU.“It’s not very good at all,” Meyer said Monday. “For what we expect, it’s not good.”Overall this season, the Buckeyes have put points on the scoreboard 23 times in 28 trips to the red zone, coming out to a conversion rate of just 82 percent. Of those 23 scores, just 19 have been touchdowns. Those numbers compare to a 92 percent success rate for opponents, who have scored 10 touchdowns and added one field goal in 12 red zone tries against OSU this season.In 2013, the Buckeyes scored 60 times in 63 attempts — a 95 percent success rate — including 53 touchdowns in the red zone. That means the 2014 Buckeyes are putting points on the board in the red zone less often than last year’s counterparts were able to come away with touchdowns alone. Their opponents, meanwhile, were held to a 79 percent rate of success inside the 20 last season.OSU’s success rate was just over 71 percent in its most recent game — a 52-24 win against Maryland on Oct. 4 — as it went just five for seven in the red zone.Meyer said the success — or lack thereof — near the goal line comes down to coaching and not the ability of the players on the field.“It’s not the players’ fault, it’s our fault,” Meyer said. “It’s coaching errors, whether it be tempo, we just have to do a better job.”OSU co-offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach Tom Herman said he agreed the team’s red zone offense isn’t rolling at the necessary level, but noted the expectations are high when it comes to putting the ball in the end zone in Columbus, especially considering the success the Buckeyes have had since he and Meyer arrived in 2012.“I think our red zone, goal line or scoring touchdowns in the red zone is certainly not where we want it to be,” Herman said Monday. “Now we’ve set the bar pretty high finishing first in the country, I think second in our first year, first last year in touchdown percentage in the red zone.”The Buckeyes’ struggles in the red zone have them ranked all the way down at No. 72 in the country for red zone scoring percentage and No. 42 in the nation in red zone touchdown percentage. OSU was ranked in the top five for both scoring and touchdown percentage last year and 16th and second, respectively, in 2012.Senior wide receiver Evan Spencer said he has noticed the Buckeyes’ less-than-expected success in the red zone so far this season.“On offense, we’ve got to try to make sure that we’re capitalizing in the red zone,” Spencer said Monday. “We had a few times — last week I’m not sure, but I know the week before — we had a few times we got stalled in the end zone. Granted we’re putting up a lot of points at the same time, but there’s little small things that we can do personally and as a team.”Herman said one of the problems OSU has had near the goal line this season is making sure it takes advantage of soft spots in the opposing defense.“We don’t care what those weaknesses are,” Herman said. “We just need (to do) a better job of exploiting those weaknesses and not trying to beat our head against the wall into their strengths.”As players and the coaching staff have taken notice of the need to convert more often inside the 20, there has been more of an emphasis on it in practice — especially during OSU’s recent bye week.Senior tight end Jeff Heuerman said the coaching staff focused on red zone offense more often than normal last week after the less-than-stellar showing against the Terrapins.“We obviously had three days of practice, I think we did red zone two of the three,” Heuerman said Monday. “We usually only do red zone once a week.”He said the Buckeyes also practiced “some live short yardage situations” that they wouldn’t normally.Herman said improvement on that part of OSU’s game will be key going forward, and added he believes it can happen if the Buckeyes continue to work toward executing every play throughout the game.“I think we’re capable now and moving in the direction of, ‘Hey, you need to play with great technique for 80 plays in a row,’” Herman said. “And I think that’s a fair expectation given the point in the season that we’re at.”The Buckeyes are scheduled to return to the field Saturday against Rutgers at Ohio Stadium. Kickoff is set for 3:30 p.m. read more

Mens Hockey Ohio State ties RPI 11 for the second straight game

Ohio State celebrates after junior forward Dakota Joshua’s goal in the second period of the Buckeyes’ 1-1 draw against Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Oct. 13. Credit: Ohio State AthleticsOhio State (1-1-2) and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (0-0-2) fought to another 1-1 tie — the second in as many days — with the Buckeyes once again winning in the shootout after the tie had been decided.RPI jumped on the Buckeyes early with a goal less than a minute into the game, but Ohio State tied the game up at one early in the second period. The battle between the pipes of the two goalies raged on the rest of the night as both teams failed to send a puck behind either netminder until the shootout. The Buckeyes were forced to play comeback hockey early on, but Ohio State junior forward John Wiitala said the team stayed true to their normal game.“I don’t think it changes anything,” Wiitala said.  “I think we always try to stick to our game plan, whether that’s up by five goals or down by five, it’s the same game plan throughout.”The scoring started early for the Engineers with a goal by junior forward Evan Tironese just 56 seconds into the first period. Freshman forward Troy York fed a pass to the back post for an easy tip-in by Tironese that redshirt junior goalie Sean Romeo had no chance at stopping, giving RPI an early 1-0 lead.The Buckeyes couldn’t find the back of the net in the first, then quickly knotted the score at one in the second period on a goal by senior forward Christian Lampasso. Wiitala tipped the puck away from the RPI defender, and senior forward Luke Stork found Lampasso wide open in the slot, giving Lampasso an opportunity to bury the shot past junior goalie Chase Perry.“[Wiitala] just made a great play,” Stork said. “He back checked the puck really well and it just happened to come back on my stick, and I looked up and saw [Lampasso] wide open in the middle, and he put it away.”Much like the previous night’s game, Romeo and Perry faced off in a goalie battle for much of this contest. The first big save came on the Ohio State end, as Romeo stuffed sophomore forward Jacob Hayhurst on a wide open shot in the slot.Not to be outdone, Perry held strong on a tough Wiitala shot with an incredible save with six minutes to go in the third period.  Perry would end the game with 27 saves, Romeo had 22.“[Romeo] got the game puck again tonight, head coach Steve Rohlik said. “At the end of the day you’re always as good as your goaltending, and certainly he was a backbone again tonight.”The game headed into overtime deadlocked at one, with neither team able to create much momentum in the third period. Ohio State led in shots 27-20 going into the extra frame.Stork created a strong chance early in the overtime, but Perry tracked the shot down with a kick save on his right pad. Junior forward Dakota Joshua had an opportunity off a pass from junior forward Brendon Kearney, but the shot went wide.RPI’s greatest chance came on a breakaway by sophomore forward Patrick Polino, but his shot went wide with under a minute to go in the overtime.The game went to a shootout where the Buckeyes won on a goal by sophomore forward Tanner Laczynski. Romeo made all three saves to secure another shootout victory. Shootouts are not counted in the standings for non-conference opponents in collegiate hockey, so the game went down as a 1-1 tie for both teams.Ohio State continued to struggle on the power play, as their 0-for-3 tally in the game moves them to 0-for-20 on the season with a man advantage.“It’s a work in progress right now,” Rohlik said. “We’re going to have to keep tweaking it before we find the right combinations.”The Buckeyes travel to play a pair of road games against University of Massachusetts Amherst.  The games are scheduled for 7 p.m. Friday and at 8 p.m Saturday. read more

Pentagon Pushing Plan to Consolidate Exchanges Commissaries Sources Say

first_imgDefense Department leaders appear to be moving ahead with a plan to consolidate the military’s commissary and exchange systems, according to multiple sources.The move comes in response to a recommendation from the Military Compensation and Retirement Modernization Commission in January. Consolidating DOD’s three exchange services with the Defense Commissary Agency into a single Defense Resale Activity would generate savings by combining many of the back-end office and support functions such as logistics and staffing, the panel concluded.A meeting this week at the Pentagon is intended to allow military resale officials to review DOD’s plans for implementing the commission’s recommendation, sources told Military Times.Congress, however, would need to approve a significant restructuring of the commissary and exchange systems.A Pentagon spokesman would not confirm the meetings. Last month, President Obama said he supported the commission’s reforms to military pay and benefits and said DOD would send Congress by April 30 a set of legislative proposals based on the recommendations.DOD proposed its own set of cost-saving reforms to the commissary system in its fiscal 2016 budget request, including trimming staff, store hours and the days stores are open. That plan also called for U.S. commissaries to be operated more like a business, forcing the grocery stores to reduce customer discounts.Opponents of DOD’s proposal — which would cut funding for commissaries by $322 million in fiscal 2016 and by $1 billion the following year — say raising prices would eliminate the shopping benefit for military families. Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

Who is Karan Patel Cricketerturnedbaseball player and first Indianorigin man drafted by

first_imgKaran Patel is the first Indian-American to be drafted by a MLB teamSouthSideSox.comThe 2014 Hollywood movie ‘Million Dollar Arm’ presented a fictionalised and exoticised version of a real story about an American sports agent who comes to India in search of talented boys who can become good baseball players. The actual talent hunt program ‘The Million Dollar Arm’ took place in 2008 and the two lucky men who were selected to go to USA and receive training under the aegis of Major League Baseball (MLB) teams were Rinku Singh and Dinesh Patel.Though both these men became the first Indians to sign a contract with MLB teams and underwent coaching, they were not able to make a big mark. Rinku is now a professional wrestler working in WWE’s developmental territory. But now, a less melodramatic but equally interesting story has unfolded in real life with a man of Indian origin becoming the first to be drafted by a MLB side.Karan Patel was born and brought up in USA and is no different from most boys of that country. But his Indian roots are reflected in his association with cricket. Patel succeeded in becoming an international player and played for USA at that level. But at the same time, he also kept himself involved with another sport that is way more popular in America than cricket – baseball.And now, the journey of this 22-year old has reached a new level with him becoming the first person of Indian origin or descent to be drafted into a MLB team – Chicago White Sox. The fact that he has been able to succeed in both sports makes this young man from Sugar Land, Texas a special character. Karan Patel has been picked up by Chicago White SoxTwitter/Conference USAKaran’s backgroundHis connection to cricket came from his father who was a cricketer himself and played for USA. But as he grew up, he also started to take interest in baseball. The fact that he was a bowler in cricket meant that pitching was his favoured suit. He may have moved on in his cricket career to become, primarily, a batsman, but pitching is what he continued to excel in at college level baseball.What’s even more interesting is that he credits his experience as a cricketer for some of those qualities that have made him a success at junior level baseball. An Alumni at the University of Texas at San Antonio, the young man is able to generate speeds of up to 94 miles/hour and also has those tricks of variation in pace that pitchers use to trouble their opponents.The Texan lad from an Indian background may just be the role model that Indian-Americans need to embrace this sport. Considering the affinity it has to their most loved sport, Cricket, there is no reason why more such players shouldn’t come through. While he may not have a movie made about his own journey, he will certainly be an inspiration to many young kidslast_img read more

9 get life for murder in Jessore

first_imgA Jessore court on Wednesday convicted nine people and sentenced them to life term imprisonment for killing an UP member in Jessore in 2005, reports UNB.Among the convicts, three accused were present in the dock during the hearing while six others—Enamul Haque, Kabir, Anis, Biplob Mia, Kamarul Mandal, Ajam Fakir—remained absconding. According to the case statement, Insanul Haque, a member of Deyara union parishad in Sadar upazila, was killed by the convicts during a robbery on 8 July in 2005. Ijarul Haque Jewel, son of the victim, filed a murder and robbery case accusing unnamed people. After examining the records and witnesses, Md Iman Ali Sheikh of the Additional District and Sessions Judge Court-1, handed down the verdict.last_img read more

No alliance unless BNP quits Jamaat B Chy

first_imgBikalpadhara Bangladesh chief Badruddoza Chowdhury is speaking at a press briefing at his Baridhara residence on Saturday evening. Photo: CollectedBikalpadhara Bangladesh chief Badruddoza Chowdhury has ruled out any possibility of forming alliance with the BNP if the main opposition party does not sever its tie with anti-liberation forces.“Bikalpadhara asked the BNP to leave Jamaat as a pre-condition for joining the National Unity Process but the BNP didn’t pay heed to the demand. We didn’t join National Oikya Front on this ground,” he said at a press briefing at his Baridhara residence on Saturday evening.B Chowdhury was elected president after the BNP-led four-party alliance including Jamaat-e-Islami assumed office winning the 2001 parliamentary polls. He resigned from the post in 2002 following his criticism in parliament.B Chowdhury, who later formed the BDB, said the other reason for his party’s not joining the new opposition coalition is that the BNP did not give assurance of ensuring a balance of power if the coalition is voted to power.He spoke to the press, minutes after the Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP), Jatiya Oikya Prokriya led by Kamal Hossain and Jukta Front made the announcement of formation of the ‘Jatiya Oikya Front’.Bikalpadhara joint secretary general and B Chy’s son Mahi B Chowdhury and secretary general Maj (retd) Abdul Mannan, among others were present at the press conference.last_img read more

UPDATE LA School Shooting Was Accidental 12YearOld In Custody

first_imgDamian Dovarganes/APPeople wait for news about the shooting that left two injured at Salvador Castro Middle School in Los Angeles on Thursday. A shooting at a Los Angeles middle school classroom Thursday that left one boy in critical condition, injured four others and had panicked parents in tears was an accident, police said.The shooting was reported just before 9 a.m. and within minutes a 12-year-old girl was taken into custody without incident. Police interviewed her and by evening they announced that they would book her on a charge of negligent discharge of a firearm on school grounds.The determination capped a frantic day at Salvador B. Castro Middle School in downtown Los Angeles and corroborated what some students told reporters after the lockdown was lifted and they were reunited with parents on the school’s athletic field.In a telephone interview with his mother alongside, Jordan Valenzuela, 12, told The Associated Press he was in the classroom next door when he heard a loud bang. He said he talked to the girl just after the shooting and she was sobbing.“She was like, ‘I didn’t mean to. I had the gun in my backpack and I didn’t know it was loaded and my backpack fell and the gun went off,’” he said.Shortly after that he said the girl asked him to hide the weapon.“She said, ‘If I give you the gun will you hide it for me?’” he said. “I said ‘No.’ Then I moved away from her because I was a little bit scared.”Shallin Lopez, a seventh-grader at the school, was in the room at the time of the shooting. She said she never saw a gun.“I just saw something pop,” she said. “It was loud. I didn’t see her shoot.”Police recovered a semi-automatic handgun after the shooting. TV video from helicopters showed a dark-haired girl in a sweatshirt being led from the school in handcuffs as anxious parents and family members gathered on a street corner, many crying and talking on their phones as they waited.Diego Salinas had just dropped off his 12-year-old sister and was stunned when she called minutes later to say there had been a shooting.“There were so many things crossing my mind,” said Salinas, who was still shaking hours later. “I wanted to cry. I wanted to scream. I wanted to run. I wanted do so many things.”Claudia Anzueto, Jordan Valenzuela’s mother, said the boy was crying when he called her from a borrowed cellphone to tell her he was OK.“Not safe, very insecure,” Anzueto said of the school. “I fear for my son’s life. You know what I mean, you really hear about things like this in the news, and just to hear that something like that happened so close to home, it scared the life out of me.”The district has a policy requiring every middle and high school campus to conduct daily random searches by metal-detector wands at different hours of the school day for students in the sixth grade and up.Student Melanie Valencia, 13, said the school did a random security search Thursday, but that she’s never been checked.The most seriously injured victim, a 15-year-old boy shot in the head, was taken to Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center and remained in intensive care during the afternoon but was doing well.“This child was extremely lucky,” said Dr. Aaron Strumwasser, a trauma surgeon. “The trajectory of the bullet did not hit any vital structures that were an immediate threat to life.”A 15-year-old girl with a gunshot wound to the wrist was hospitalized in fair condition. An 11-year-old boy and a 12-year-old girl were grazed and were treated and released from the hospital. A 30-year-old woman who was treated after the shooting was not hospitalized and the nature of her injury was not immediately known.The school’s campus was placed on lockdown but most classes continued. The school has about 365 students in grades 6-8 and almost all are Hispanic and many are from low-income families.“We will attend to the needs of these students who witnessed this very carefully, with the understanding this is very traumatic,” said Steve Zipperman, chief of the Los Angeles Unified School District police force. “We have our school mental health folks that are here to support the needs of the students.”#Rampart; #LAFD and #LAPD provide update regarding today’s school shooting. pic.twitter.com/1aoltc15F2— Erik Scott (@PIOErikScott) February 1, 2018 Update 5 Patients #Assist; 8:53AM; 1575 W 2ND ST; Westlake; LAFD assisting LAPD with a shooting … https://t.co/2i7jR2fHpl— LAFD (@LAFD) February 1, 2018 #Assist; 8:53AM; 1575 W 2ND ST; https://t.co/1jxzXQLhMj; Westlake; LAFD assisting LAPD … https://t.co/rrcFsdbnpT— LAFD (@LAFD) February 1, 2018 #LIVE Aerials over LA school where 2 students were reportedly shot and a female student suspect is in custody https://t.co/pJRifBCEVv— ABC 7 News – WJLA (@ABC7News) February 1, 2018 #LIVE aerials over LA school where 2 students have reportedly been shot and a female student suspect is in custody. Watch: https://t.co/CUW7QSayal pic.twitter.com/T2EC7UA1le— ABC 7 News – WJLA (@ABC7News) February 1, 2018 Sharelast_img read more

Benefits of feeding dogs right during monsoon

first_imgHair shedding, immunity issues or an infection – the answer to these problems faced by your dog can be found in their diet, say experts. Pet Experts and Veterinary Surgeons, suggest a few dietary tips and tricks to take care of your pet this monsoon:Fighting infections: Diet is the one of the most important elements to solve the underlying problem of yeast build up and its resulting infections throughout a dog’s body. One of the symptoms is excessive itching, in case such symptoms persist consult your vet. Add balanced fibrous food to your dog’s diet to ensure regular bowel movements, which in the rainy season can be a blessing as the exposure to outdoors can be restricted. You can try to engage your dog in some indoor exercises to prevent weight gain. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfBuilding immunity: A dog’s diet is the foundation of building good immunity. Every dog’s requirement for nutrition is different. For instance, a large sized adult dog’s nutritional needs vary from that of a small sized adult dog. An ideal wholesome meal should contain Vitamin C, Vitamin E and Omega 3 fatty acids as they have important immune and anti-inflammatory functions that contribute to a dog’s health and vitality. Your dog’s meal should contain these nutrients. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveTaking care of your puppy: New born pups are the most susceptible to infections. There is an ‘Immunity Gap’ when they wean off their mother’s milk and this is an extremely crucial time to ensure that they are fed a diet which has been carefully designed to deal with the situation. To bridge this gap, it is imperative to feed them the optimal pet food which contains colostrum. Since, colostrum is first milk produced by the mother immediately after giving birth, it is highly important for newborn pups. Colostrum can also be found as a special ingredient in select packaged pet foods. Pet food fortified with colostrum is proven to enhance immune response in pups for an overall promotion of their digestive and immune health and response to vaccination. Avoid hair shedding: A pet’s coat is the reflection of its health and the food that it consumes. A shiny and healthy coat is the result of optimal nutrition which is a key to a dog’s general well-being. Provide your dog with high quality diet with digestible protein sources. Foods with Omega 3 fatty acids also play an important role in promoting a healthy coat with minimal shedding. What to avoid this season: It is quite common for pet owners to feed their pets with whatever is on their plate or the leftovers. Avoid raw meat, raw chicken, excessive fibrous vegetables and raw or cooked bones. It is essential to follow a particular diet plan and a close watch should be kept on a dog’s health when switching food habits.last_img read more

Why This Collaborative Platform for Musicians Is Drumming Up Big Bucks

first_imgJanuary 16, 2015 Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals This story appears in the January 2015 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe » 4 min read Steve Martocci’s goal for Splice is nothing less than to change the course of music creation. “We think we can lead an entire new movement in music,” he says. Splice allows musicians to create, share and store their work digitally with unprecedented ease. The music platform is compatible with popular digital audio workstations such as Ableton, Logic Pro and FL Studio, with others in the works.“We’re trying to allow artists to create fearlessly and never worry about backup, losing their work or missing files when they’re sending things to people,” says Martocci, a tech and startup veteran who previously co-founded the messaging platform GroupMe. “They just get to focus on making their music.” Add in a community angle that allows aspiring musicians to play with tunes, isolating tracks and creating remixes, and Splice has the makings of an online musical playground. New York-based Martocci sold GroupMe to Skype in 2011 for a figure reported between $43 million and $85 million. (He declined to comment.) He met his Splice co-founder, Santa Monica, Calif.-based software architect Matt Aimonetti, at a 2012 entrepreneurship conference. They were united in their belief that the digital creation process for music was stuck in the ’90s. “Matt was an audio engineer for half his life. I’m a huge music fan,” Martocci says. “If you sit at this apex of music and code, you wonder why these concepts of connected creation and easy collaboration don’t exist for music.”“One of the first discussions we had was about seeing the DNA of music,” Aimonetti adds. “So much of it is black box. I’m obsessed with exposing the creative aspect.” Martocci and Aimonetti (who previously worked with LivingSocial and Sony PlayStation) launched Splice in October 2013 with $2.75 million in seed funding. The company raised an additional $4.5 million last year in Series A funding, led by Palo Alto, Calif.-based True Ventures. That round also included investments from New York-based Union Square Ventures, as well as some music-industry heavyweights, including superstar DJs Tiësto and Swedish House Mafia’s Steve Angello; Justin Bieber’s manager, Scooter Braun; and the William Morris Endeavor Entertainment talent agency.True Ventures principal Adam D’Augelli was impressed with Splice’s founders and the platform’s easy integration for musicians. “They were highly focused and executed well—they built the first version of the product themselves while gathering market and potential customer feedback in a few weeks,” D’Augelli says. “We were excited about their tight focus on building a platform that didn’t require any changes in work flow but, rather, [supported] artists in the way they currently worked.”The investments from the music industry are “a big piece of validation,” Martocci adds. “When you show [Splice] to an artist, their eyes light up. It’s going to make my life easier to get this in front of the forward-thinkers in music.”The capital will go toward further developing and fine-tuning the product. “We’re making sure we’re solid on the platform and adding things as we go,” Martocci says. “We just need to make [Splice] so good and strong that musicians share it and we create value for them.”Splice was in private beta for 10 months before switching to a free public beta in mid-September. The site will maintain a free tier, but Martocci says it will migrate slowly toward charging for additional features. “We’re constantly building a backlog of the amazing things we think we can offer for premium services from the education side, the professional producers’ side,” he says. “It’s endless.”  Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Register Now »last_img read more