Lack of offense frustrating as Ohio State womens ice hockey drops both

Ohio State junior forward Claudia Kepler (24) controls the puck during a game against Bemidji State University on Nov. 6 at the OSU Ice Rink. OSU lost 2-1. Credit: Eileen McClory | Senior Lantern ReporterThe Ohio State women’s ice hockey team is still searching for consistency after losing both games in its weekend series to Bemidji State, falling to 4-6-0 on the season.On Friday, the Buckeyes lost 2-1 despite outshooting the Beavers 22-17 in what turned out to be a stifling defensive game. Freshman forward Dana Rasmussen scored the lone goal for OSU. Senior Hannah Moher and sophomore Bailey Wright scored for the Beavers.On Saturday, the third period began tied 1-1 with the Buckeyes leading in shots 27-14. But two goals late in the third period gave Bemidji State the victory and the series sweep.“I think for the most part we controlled both the games. I thought we outplayed them for the majority of the game,” OSU coach Jenny Potter said. “I think there were just a few times that our players broke down mentally.” Bemidji State junior goaltender Brittni Mowat started both games for the Beavers, allowing just two goals on the weekend despite facing a combined 55 shots in the two games.“Bemidji has a great team, but they’re not invincible. We had plenty of scoring opportunities, plenty of chances, our team needs to learn how to bury them,” Potter said.Redshirt freshman Alex LaMere started both games in goal for the Buckeyes, turning away all but three shots on the weekend, while going through long stretches of quiet net play. With the lull in opportunities to save shots, LaMere said she just tries to stay locked in.“It’s definitely a mental game at that point, you just have to keep sharp on your edges,” LaMere said.The second game opened with the Buckeyes holding an 8-1 shot advantage, but the team believed the tempo of the game picked up considerably as it wore on. LaMere said she thinks the defense was able to keep pace with the Beavers’ attack. “Our defensive zone has come a really long way,” LaMere said. “(The skaters) stick with your girl, if we can play five-on-five that way we’ll be just fine.”LaMere expressed no frustration in having sit through a quiet first half of play before a run of fast-paced play in the final 30 minutes.“Yesterday we saw a lot of the same thing as today, it started off slower and then the pace picked up, from a goalie’s standpoint. (We) just have to keep moving and keep in the game,” LaMere said.Bemidji State entered the weekend series with one of the top ranked defenses in all of college hockey, however, OSU expressed frustration at the opportunities missed having outshot the Beavers in both games.“I guess they’re learning the hard way,” Potter said. “It can be frustrating as a coach, but it’s the learning process they’re going through.”Senior forward Kendall Curtis, who scored the lone OSU goal on Saturday, voiced her irritation with the lack of offensive results, but she said she believes in the team’s system.“Sometimes it can get frustrating, but we what want to focus on is getting new looks and how to create new offense, that was our focus,” Curtis said.Curtis’ goal was the product of strong communication and game planning with her linemates: sophomore Julianna Iafallo and junior Claudia Kepler.“We really know our roles,” Curtis said. “We know that the best way for us to operate is by playing with some giddy-up, winning battles, keeping it simple, keeping our feet moving.”Curtis, who earlier this week was named an alternate captain, said she thinks the play of her line is important to the success of the program, which is struggling to score with only 22 goals in its first 10 games.“The giddy-up we bring to the ice every shift is really important,” Curtis said. “We know that.”The Buckeyes are set to begin a five-game road swing when they travel to face North Dakota in Grand Forks for a weekend series on Nov. 14 and 15. read more

Commentary Former Lantern sports editor not sure if inner sports fan still

For nearly a year-and-a-half as the sports editor of The Lantern, I suppressed my inner sports fan out of professional obligation. Having come out the other side and attempted to rekindle my love of sports this past weekend for the first time since resigning from my post in January, I’m not sure how much of a sports fan still resides in me. The times I spent as the sports editor of The Lantern were some of the best of my life. I had the privilege of roaming sidelines and locker rooms all over America while bearing witness to the Ohio State athletic department’s many teams and student-athletes. The price of admission for this rare opportunity was shelving the sports fan in me. Upon taking the position in the summer 2011, I was all too happy to abide by that stipulation, which all sports writers must do, of course. I didn’t stop to realize what I was looking at during my editorship, but there were times when covering the OSU athletic department went far beyond the chalk on the field. In truth, the editorship was a lot like walking in on your parents having sex. By this, I mean that you also bear witness to the ugly side of things – things that are burned into your memory forever. It is the kind of stuff that is obviously taking place but you’d rather not see. In the case of the sports writer, it is the kind of thing you’d prefer not to report on or witness, but must. It is the things you read while sifting through hefty documents after Freedom of Information Act open records requests are fulfilled. It is the stories you hear about coaches and athletes being jerks when the bright lights aren’t shining their way. Of course, it is also the public relations person that argues you have misrepresented the truth about their team or their department. There is no ugly side to the true sports fan, though. Fandom, in its purest form, is innocent and unassuming. Men, women and children of all ages commit themselves to their chosen team and make an emotional investment with no promise of a return. The team’s success can be the daily metric of a fan’s happiness or despair. This can be a cruel way to live, but it’s the chosen way of life for so many. When I attempted to awaken my inner sports fan for the occasion of the OSU men’s basketball team’s game against Indiana on Sunday at the Schottenstein Center, my inner sports fan didn’t wake up. I don’t know if he ever will. With only a vague recollection of the game day rituals OSU fans partake in, I did my best to recreate an authentic fan experience. To gain admittance to the stadium, I pulled a crumbled ticket from my coat pocket and held my breath as an usher scanned the barcode – I had purchased the ticket for an exorbitant price from a scalper just five minutes earlier. This, of course, was a departure from flashing a press badge to get inside. Once inside, I didn’t have a free meal with unlimited Coca-Cola products provided for me. Rather, I had to pay for a hot dog and a pop like the other 18,808 fans in attendance. And my seat wasn’t arm’s length from the court. I was up in Section 332, Row “R,” Seat 12. It is not as posh as press row, but true fans take pride in simply being present for the big event, proximity to the playing surface aside. I even perused the souvenir shop on the lower level and wore an OSU T-shirt to the game – to the untrained eye I was just another nameless, ticket-bearing, die-hard member of Buckeye Nation. This die-hard died quickly, though, and I quickly had to concede that my experience was anything but authentic. I observed the game with the submissive silence and shifty eyes of a deadline reporter. No time or cause for cheering as far as I could see. Of course, silence in the presence of two top-10-ranked basketball teams playing in sold-out arenas was beginning to make me stick out. The media resist emotional reaction to game play, but the wild crowing and bellowing of the sports fan – let us call those reactions “fangasms” – is accepted bleacher etiquette in most stadiums. In a desperate attempt to participate and gain the approval of the people I was sitting near, I began to curse and cry out loudly during the second half of the game. Having not attended an OSU game of any kind as a fan in about a year-and-a-half, I had all but forgotten how to cheer. I was crying out at inappropriate moments, or too long after the play was over. My reactions were a forgery. I was a fraud. I was faking my fangasms. The embarrassment of my fraudulent fangasms arrived midway through the second half, and Indiana was in control of the game by that point. The Hoosiers went on to coast to an 81-68 win. I stayed until the final buzzer, but I knew I had spent each second of the 40 minutes of game action occupying a seat that would have been better suited for someone eager to twirl a Homage rally towel and root hard for OSU. If there was a way for me to realize I wasn’t fan enough anymore that didn’t involve handing a fistful of cash to a ticket scalper, surely I would have pursued that action. For all that I gained as sports editor of The Lantern, and I promise you that I gained greatly, I lost the fan in me, for now at least. Sports are my lifeblood, so shelving my fandom and my passion for sports writing simultaneously is out of the question. I suppose it is really a win-win situation because, as I did during my editorship, I’m sure to continue meeting interesting people and seeing things that true fans can only dream of seeing. There are more good days ahead. Perhaps I came into the field of sports writing too naive about how things really work. Maybe my view of sports fans is more of an idealistic hope than a reality. In any event, the path of the sports writer, and not that of the sports fan, is the path I will continue down. That is to say, I’ll stay on this path as long as I can continue to stomach a job that occasionally requires me to witness things that we don’t always want to see. read more

Sir Geoff Hurst slams Cahill and Vardy for quitting England

first_imgEngland former player and World Cup winner, Sir Geoff Hurst has criticised Jamie Vardy and Gary Cahill for their decisions to retire from international duty.Jamie Vardy and Gary Cahill were both in the England squad as they reached the semi-finals at the World Cup this summer.The duo then decided to make themselves unavailable for England in order to concentrate on club football.Even though they could still feature for England in the future, Hurst was angered by their decision. Team Talk reports.“While there’s plenty to be positive about our national side right now, I must admit I was disappointed to see Jamie Vardy and Gary Cahill choose to retire from international duty,” Hurst said.Jadon Sancho, Borussia DortmundCrouch: Liverpool could beat Man United to Jadon Sancho Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Peter Crouch wouldn’t be surprised to see Jadon Sancho end up at Liverpool one day instead of his long-term pursuers Manchester United.“I’m a firm believer that players should play for their country as long as they possibly can.“My team-mates and I would have given our last breath to continue playing for England.“I also don’t like when players say they’ll make themselves available again if there are injuries or suspensions.“In my view, if I was England manager, then I wouldn’t pick those players ever again.”last_img read more

What a Blue Chip Advertiser Wants From You Hint More Community

first_img1. User generated content. “The customer is in control. We need to find ways to facilitate that. User dialogue is crucial to online success and as publishers, that’s scary. Ceding control is scary.”2. Trust in ability of the audience to be self-policing. “They will bring us back to center if we let them.” 3. Peer-to-Peer Interaction. “It’s where we’re going.”4. Transparency and openness. “They can smell BS a mile away and they call you on a problem.”5. Low barriers to entry. “Offer enough choices that customers can participate and be comfortable.” 6. Collaboration. “Are we allowing customers to share ideas? We need to work with each other to solve problems.”7. Connecting. “Connect people to information. We have everything the marketplace is looking for. We have to make sure people have access to information.”8. Investment. “We have to understand we will attract people first and make money later. We don’t make a penny on Facebook but we could make a lot of money down the road. Business-to-business buyers are people and people are community-driven.” Brands are interested in becoming part of the conversation both online and in print, according to IBM vice president of marketing Edward Abrams (who stressed that doesn’t mean violating editorial autonomy but didn’t offer an example). “Magazines are important from that independent, authoritative perspective,” said Abrams, who spoke at the recent ABM Spring Meeting. “How do I get embedded in a way that’s less an advertising approach? I’m not talking about crossing the church-state line but how do we participate?” That means publishers need to approach information channels differently and in some cases, give up control. “We need to understand the customer mindset,” says Abrams. “You’ve all heard a lot about social media but what does it mean? IBM is the largest community on LinkedIn. It’s a community on Facebook. These are the types of things we are looking for you to help with. IBM great at manufacturing but not communicating. Publishers more capable. That’s the magic bullet that will differentiate the b-to-b market.”Below, Abrams highlights eight key points publishers should focus on:last_img read more

What Can the Astros Do to Compete with the Red Sox Going

first_img 00:00 /06:57 Listen To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: David J. Phillip/APBoston Red Sox catcher Christian Vazquez holds the championship trophy after Game 5 of the World Series on Sunday, Oct. 28, in Los Angeles.center_img X Share The World Series ended last night with the Boston Red Sox defeating the Los Angeles Dodgers in Game 5, to take the series 4-1.Now, with the season over, what can the Astros do to get back to baseball’s promised land and to compete with the Red Sox going forward? Jesus Ortiz is a senior editor for La Vida Baseball and a former Astros beat writer. In the audio above, he tells Houston Matters host Craig Cohen he thinks the Astros are in good shape to contend for several more years.And Ortiz discusses the historic win by Boston manager (and former Astros coach) Alex Cora, who became the first Puerto Rican to manage a team to a World Series title.last_img read more

Larry Young Show Again Cited Among Best in US

first_imgLarry Young, former Maryland State Senator and current host of “The Larry Young Morning Show,” was named one of the 100 most important talk show hosts in the country by industry bible “Talkers Magazine.” His show is heard Monday through Friday on WOLB 1010 AM from 6 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. According to the magazine, Young is ranked 45 out of 100. Young was first named to the list in 2007 as number 99 and has steadily moved up the ranks year in and year out.Larry Young, former Maryland State Senator and current host of “The Larry Young Morning Show. (Courtesy Photo)last_img read more

Womens Basketball Season Tickets On Sale

first_imgStory Links Fans can also purchase a CardsPass for $75. CardsPass is our flexible mobile season ticketing program that guarantees a seat to all 2019-20 Louisville women’s basketball regular season home games. CardsPass holders will receive best availability on a game-by-game basis, however, seat locations will vary each game. Walz Wednesdays CardsPass Last season, the Cardinals produced a second consecutive 30-win season with a 32-4 record and won their second straight ACC regular season title. They entered the NCAA Tournament as a No. 1 seed for the second straight year and advanced to the Elite Eight for the fifth time in program history. LOUISVILLE, Ky. – Season tickets for the University of Louisville’s 2019-20 14-game home women’s basketball schedule in the KFC Yum! Center are now available for purchase. Under 13th year head coach Jeff Walz, the Cardinals will host seven opponents that reached postseason play a season ago, seven that won 20-plus games and five that played in the NCAA Tournament. Women’s basketball season tickets may be purchased by clicking here or by visiting the UofL Ticket Office, located near Gate 2 of Cardinal Stadium at 2800 South Floyd Street, on weekdays from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. or by calling 502-852-5151. Season Tickets Louisville averaged 9,531 fans per game with a 162,021 accumulative attendance in 2018-19, both of which ranked third in the country. The Cardinals welcomed in 17,023 fans for the 78-69 win over UConn, which was the third largest women’s basketball crowd last season and the fourth biggest crowd for a women’s basketball game at the KFC Yum! Center. They had three of the top eight crowds in all of women’s basketball and welcomed in 10,000-plus fans seven times last season.For the latest on Louisville women’s basketball, visit GoCards.com, or follow the team’s Twitter account at @UofLWBB or on Facebook at facebook.com/UofLWBB. Print Friendly Version The dates for the non-conference games, along with the Notre Dame game, which will take place on Sunday, Feb. 16, were released last week, while the remainder of the ACC dates are scheduled to be released in September. Buy your tickets today and you will automatically be enrolled into our Walz Wednesday drawings, where fans can win exclusive Louisville women’s basketball prizes. Every Wednesday through September, each season ticket holder that has purchased or renewed Louisville women’s basketball season tickets will be entered to win a Jeff Walz signed item. Louisville will host Western Kentucky, Murray State, Central Michigan, UT Chattanooga and Boise State in non-conference play. In Atlantic Coast Conference play, the Cardinals will host Boston College, Duke, Florida State, Notre Dame, Pittsburgh, Syracuse, Virginia, Virginia Tech and Wake Forest. Additional information is available online at www.GoCards.com/wbbtickets or by emailing the UofL ticket office at tickets@gocards.com. Reserved Season Tickets are available for just $135 for adults, $105 for seniors (55-and-over) and $75 for those 18 and younger.last_img read more

Listen Refinery29 Chief Amy Emmerich on Navigating Digital Media The Audience Is

first_img“It was a matter of adjusting our strategy to watch the decline of paid and the incline of search.” As digital publishers were examining the impact of post-Facebook marketplace swings, it became clear to Emmerich and Refinery29 leaders that advertisers were become wary of less-than-organic user growth. “Who wants somebody that you had to buy? That’s not necessarily someone you’re trying to talk to,” Emmerich says.Emmerich joined Refinery29 in 2015 after a stint at Vice and after building up a long resume as a producer and programming executive in cable at MTV and Travel Channel, among others. The digital world was attractive to her because it seemed like “the wild West.” Even compared to the voracious programming appetite of 24/7 cable channels, running a digital lifestyle brand is hard-charging work.“You have to be comfortable with change,” she says. “You have to think about your strategies and review them quarterly. Unlike when I was in television when it was a yearly experience.”Emmerich’s mantra for guiding Refinery29’s content efforts — which include everything from short films showcased at Sundance to traditional TV series and feature films in development with various partners — is simple: “The audience is the boss of me.” Emmerich and her team are laser-focused on tracking what makes young women tick. Impressing tech-savvy, pop culture-loving 20- 30- and 40-somethings is no easy feat. “We’ve birthed a generation with technology where they are all creators the minute they get a phone in their hand,” Emmerich says.“Strictly Business” is Variety‘s weekly podcast featuring conversations with industry leaders about the business of entertainment. A new episode debuts each Tuesday and can be downloaded on iTunes, Spotify, Google Play, Stitcher, and SoundCloud. Refinery29 was ahead of the curve among digital-native publishers in emphasizing video as a means of keeping users engaged for longer stretches and on a more frequent basis.Amy Emmerich, president North America and chief content officer for the lifestyle brand aimed at young women, says that that early focus on ramping up short- and long-form video allowed the company to navigate the choppy waters caused by Facebook’s now-infamous algorithm revamp in late 2017 that has taken such a toll on digital media outfits.On the latest episode of Variety‘s podcast “Strictly Business,” Emmerich says the changes in the digital landscape during the past few years also drove Refinery29 to wean itself of paid audience acquisition to pad its monthly user base. At present, Refinery29’s attracts a monthly user base of about 30 million. Listen: Discovery’s Kathleen Finch on How to Nurture Lifestyle Brands Popular on Variety “We’ve made a concerted effort to shrink the amount of paid (traffic) that happens at this company and we’ve done so pretty successfully,” Emmerich says. Related Listen: A Showbiz Lawyer Satirizes Hollywood In His New Novel ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15last_img read more

Soon concrete roads to be constructed in New Town

first_imgKolkata: Housing Infrastructure Development Corporation (HIDCO) has proposed to set up concrete roads in New Town in phases.This will reduce the maintenance cost of the stretches which eats up a major portion of the revenue collection. The potholes and crators that have been created due to the monsoon in areas under Sector V and Nabadiganta will be repaired before the Durga Puja. A workshop to find out methods to set up roads for longer duration was held in New Town on Thursday. Senior officials of HIDCO, New Town Kolkata Development Authority (NKDA), Nabadiganta Industrial Township Authority (NDITA) attended the workshop along with engineers and experts in road construction. There are 200km roads in New Town while Sector V has another 25 kilometers road. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeThe experts said that while constructing concrete roads, the upper layer should be covered with a thin layer of tar. This would help the cars to move smoothly and reduce the level of environmental pollution as well. The experts suggested that for the good health of the roads, the cracks that are more than 3 mm deep should be repaired immediately. Representatives of a start-up company said they would provide vehicles fitted with CCTV cameras which will help them to detect the cracks. The specially-designed vehicles will move around in New Town. There will a central monitoring system. Once the cracks are detected, the road repairing agencies will be informed through the monitoring system. HIDCO will ask the firm to do a pilot study and on the basis of the report, subsequent steps will be taken. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedEmphasis will also be given on visual improvement. HIDCO has taken up elaborate measures to increase the green cover in the area. Tall tree nurseries have been set up and with the state Forest Department, massive plantation of saplings have been done. Saplings were given to NGOs and individual owners and cooperatives looking after housing complexes during the Forest Week. The roadside trees are being watered daily with recycled water with the help of specially designed vehicles.last_img read more

Reliving memories through art

first_imgOpenings windows to their imaginings of a reality that is unconventional and far removed from everyday trials, a group of artist have up with an artshow .Titled ‘Tales of Yore’, the month-long exhibition has invited artists, sculptors and satirists including K G Subramanyan, Shanti Dave, Jogen Chowdhary, Manu Parekh, K S Radhakrishnan, Arpana Caur, Sanjay Bhattacharya, to name a few, and will go until February 28 Every work of art displayed is a passage its creator travels to tell a story, to make newer discoveries of visions gifted by time and its many paradigms. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfViewers can see the conflict between flawless time and the raw innocence of imagination which is best captured by the forever pursuits of quizzing minds that artists epitomise. One of the artist Sandeep Jingdung has tried to reflect the experiences of his birth place Assam through his art work. From its flora and fauna, childhood memories to his love for natural surroundings, he has tried to infuse everything on the canvas beautifully. On the other hand, K S Radhakrishnan with his sculptures attempts to give a reflection of history, memory loss and his deep engagement with the world. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveApart from nature and childhood memories, artists have also tried to depict different cultural aspects, imaginary characters and a lot more. Based on mythology, Jayasri Burman’s artworks have a lyrical quality, decorative designs and elements of folk idiom. Whereas, Arpana’s work are feminine in context. Female figures emerge as symbols of solidarity. Internationally acclaimed artist Jogen Chowdhury has also displayed his works in the exhibition. Based on the memories, thoughts, dream and his immediate environment, the work is the combination of satire and anger, and real with imaginary in a fine sensibility and technique used by him.last_img read more

February 27 2007 This continues the report fro

first_imgFebruary 27, 2007 This continues the report from 2/16/07. Now that the wall panels are in place, attention is focused on the path around the new wall. This years first workshop gets a good taste of hearty digging. The old path pavers are picked up. The earth at the east and north side of the wall is dug down to be even with the retaining wall. Dirt is re-distributed to bring other parts of the path up to the same level. [Photo & text: sa] A lot of digging happens at the north side, to establish easier access for handicapped visitors and general deliveries. Workshop participant Matt works on, and fixes!! the compactor. [Photo & text: sa] A form is completed for an addition to the existing retaining wall at the east side and the concrete mixer is fired up for the first concrete pour for this workshop. This story will continue on 2/28/07. [Photo & text: sa]last_img read more

Technicolor has used the CES show in Las Vegas to

first_imgTechnicolor has used the CES show in Las Vegas to launch M-GO, a new consumer brand that will allow users to combine media including movies, music, apps and live TV in one cloud-based location.Technicolor plans to launch the service in the US this spring before launching it internationally next year.Technicolor has struck strategic relationships with Intel and TV manufacturers Samsung and Vizio to support M-GO, which will feature a discovery engine to enable consumers to access content online. The M-GO app can be used on smartphones or connected tablets, which can then be used to view TV or as companion devices.Through the relationship with Samsung, M-GO will come pre-loaded on Samsung’s 2012 Smart TVs and Blu-Ray Disc players and will be accessible on Galaxy tablets. It will also allow users to get access to bonus content including deleted scenes and games on connected Galaxy devices while watching movies on TV.M-GO will also come pre-loaded on Vizio TVs, tablets, Blu-Ray players and stream players that are part of the Vizio Internet Apps Plus ecosystem.The relationship with Intel will make M-GO available on Intel Ultrabooks devices through the Intel AppUp centre, bringing HD digital content for TV, movies, music and apps to Ultrabooks and other Intel-based devices enabled by Intel Insider.John Batter has been named as CEO of M-GO. “We could not be more thrilled to be partnering with the leading technology brands to deliver the best and most immersive experience regardless of where, when, and how media is consumed,” said Batter.last_img read more

BeIN Sportsowned Turkish pay TV leader Digitürk h

first_imgBeIN Sports-owned Turkish pay TV leader Digitürk has secured the exclusive rights to broadcast UEFA Champions League and Europa League football in Turkey for the next three years, beginning with the 2018-19 season.The Champions League deal adds to Digitürk’s existing line-up of premium sports rights, which includes the exclusive rights in Turkey to the main local football leagues the Spor Toto Super League and Spor Toto 1 League. Digitürk also holds the local rights to the English Premier league along with S Sport TV, Spain’s La Liga, Italy’s Seri A, France’s Ligue 1 and Brazil’s Série A.Yousef Al-ObaidlyDigitürk subscribers with the Star of Sports package will be able to watch Champions League and Europa League matches free of charge during the current season, while subscribers who sign up before the end of this year to the package will be able to watch the 2018-19 competitions without any additional charge.“We are delighted to welcome the most prestigious competitions in club football to our portfolio of sports programming, complementing other recent agreements reached with LaLiga and Serie A,” said Digitürk CEO Yousef Al-Obaidly.“Turkish football fans now have to look no further than Digiturk to watch the world’s best players compete week in, week out. Thanks to our close association with BeIN Media Group, subscribers also benefit from their high tech broadcasts and on demand technologies, getting viewers closer to the action than ever before. This is fantastic news for sports, and particularly football, fans in Turkey.”last_img read more