World Cup final was both the best and worst day of my cricketing life: Martin Guptill

first_img India Today Web Desk New DelhiJuly 23, 2019UPDATED: July 23, 2019 13:35 IST Martin Guptill stayed motionless with his head sulking after the World Cup final ended in defeat for New Zealand (Reuters Photo)HIGHLIGHTSEngland were declared winners of the World Cup on boundary count after the match and Super Over were tiedMartin Guptill was involved in the controversial overthrow incident with Ben Stokes in the World Cup final at Lord’sGuptill endured a terrible time at CWC 19 with just 186 runs from 10 ODIsMartin Guptill finally opened up on the epic Cricket World Cup 2019 final match, describing the England-New Zealand clash as the best and worst day of his career.The New Zealand opener was involved in probably two of the most important moments of the July 14 final at Lord’s, the result of which was eventually decided on boundary count after both the teams could not be separated after the end of the allotted 100 overs and the subsequent Super Overs.”Hard to believe it’s been a week since that incredible Final at Lords. I think it was both the best and worst day of my cricketing life! So many different emotions, but mainly proud to represent New Zealand and play for the Black Caps alongside a great group of mates. Thank you to everyone for all your support, it has been amazing,” Guptill said in an emotional Instagram post on Tuesday.At the fag end of the final of the World Cup 2019, England had looked down and out as New Zealand’s death bowlers seemed to have created a vice-like grip over the match, not giving Ben Stokes room to hit the big shots.advertisementIn the final over of England’s chase with the team needing 9 to win off 3 balls, Guptill’s throw from deep mid-wicket region struck a diving Ben Stokes’s bat on the full at the striker’s end and the ball raced away to the boundary behind the wicketkeeper. Thus, instead of 2 runs, England got awarded 6 bringing the equation down to 3 required off 2 balls – a much more achievable target, even though Trent Boult ensured a tie.When the match went into the Super Over, Guptill found himself on the field again but this time he had the responsibility to score 16 off 6 balls to bring New Zealand home their maiden World Cup. On the last delivery of the Super Over Guptill was on strike with his side needing 2 off 1 but he only managed to dig out Jofra Archer’s full delivery to Jason Roy at deep mid-wicket. As he scampered for the 2nd run, Roy’s throw found Jos Buttler’s gloves at the striker’s end, who dislodged the stumps in a flash. Guptill desperately dived to cross the crease but was found well short when the bails were dislodged bringing an end to a crazy Lord’s evening.As the England players celebrated in ecstasy, Guptill stayed motionless with his head sulking trying to make sense of what had just transpired. Soon he was being comforted by his teammates and even Chris Woakes came up to him to offer words of encouragement.When the dust finally settled on the exhilarating Lord’s evening, Guptill wouldn’t be faulted for still wondering what went on with him at World Cup 2019. He couldn’t have imagined the events of the past 6 weeks before, but he is sure to be revisited by them for a long time to come.Also Read | Martin Guptill’s World Cup story: Poor run with the bat, crucial run-outs and a heartbreaking overthrowAlso Read | Didn’t want to feel the pain and regret of losing another final: Jos ButtlerAlso Read | World Cup 2019: Stokes asked umpire to take off four overthrows during final, claims AndersonFor sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byrohan sen Tags :Follow Martin GuptillFollow England vs New ZealandFollow World Cup 2019 World Cup final was both the best and worst day of my cricketing life: Martin GuptillMartin Guptill was involved in probably two of the most important moments of the Cricket World Cup final at Lord’s, the result of which was eventually decided on boundary count in favour of England.advertisementlast_img read more

Bridgewater Resident Earns National Literacy Award

first_imgA graduate of the Bridgewater Adult High School is this year’s recipient of the Nova Scotia Council of the Federation Literacy Award. Jocelyne Boutilier received the award during a presentation ceremony at Province House today, Sept. 8. It was presented in recognition of her outstanding achievement and excellence in literacy. Ms. Boutilier said she never dreamed she would receive a diploma or attend university. “I struggled to balance my role as ad hoc parent to my five siblings as well as coping with two pregnancies of my own,” said Ms. Boutilier. “I eventually had to leave high school and always intended to go back, but there came a point when I wasn’t sure I had the confidence to return.” Despite the heavy toll her family obligations were taking, Ms. Boutilier enrolled at the Bridgewater Adult High School. Today she holds her high school diploma and has received an entrance scholarship to attend Dalhousie University’s nursing program. “Ms. Boutilier is an excellent example of what you can accomplish when you believe in yourself,” said Labour and Advanced Education Minister Labi Kousoulis. “Her story clearly shows that the more literate and skilled we become, the better able we are to reach our potential.” “It’s such an honour to be recognized for my efforts in overcoming these obstacles and achieving this milestone,” said Ms. Boutilier. “I have proven that with a goal, self-determination and hard work, the opportunities are endless.” The award is presented annually to an adult learner who demonstrates outstanding achievements in literacy and makes a significant contribution to their school, workplace, or community. Thirteen Council of the Federation Literacy Awards are presented annually, one for each province and territory. Each year, the Department of Labour and Advanced Education, on behalf of Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil, co-ordinates the annual Council of the Federation Literacy Award for Nova Scotia.last_img read more

Students are getting their dream colleges at overseas while connecting their passion

first_imgNew Delhi: Students of Indian origin are traveling in higher numbers than ever before to pursue higher education abroad. Nearly 85% of internationally mobile Indian students head for five countries—the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada and New Zealand—but China and Germany are both emerging destinations for Indian students heading abroad, though the numbers heading for Germany are still relatively small. In 2006, of the 123,000 studying outside India, 76,500 chose the US, followed by the UK; in 2001 India overtook China as the source of the largest number of foreign students in the United States. Also Read – An income drop can harm brainStudents have” bagged 550+ admission offers in 2019 and more than 150 scholarships of over $ 5,000,000 from universities across U.K, U.S, Canada, Italy, New Zealand, Switzerland, Australia among others” says Vinu warrier from eduvelocity. They will be hosting its annual event, Jubilation 2019, at JW Marriott Hotel, Chandigarh on 21st July, 2019. This year EV will graduate 110 students; 88 undergraduate and 22 postgraduate students, waiting to enter top-notch universities across the globe. Also Read – Shallu Jindal honoured with Mahatma AwardIt is an international group of trained, qualified, and experienced education counsellors who help students—from grade 9 through grade 12 and from first-year through fourth-year of undergraduate studies— make the “best-fit” education and career choices for themselves, in India and overseas. We prepare students for admissions with scholarships to the world’s best universities by integrating a variety of services including psychometric testing; academic, aptitude and career counselling both for India and overseas; life skills development; stream selection, program selection, profile development, long-term mentoring; and one-on-one, personalized assistance with every step of the application process.last_img read more

Trio of Calgary kids ask Canadian coffee chain to rethink popular contest

first_imgOTTAWA — A trio of young people in Calgary are challenging Canada’s iconic coffee chain to use its popular contest to get Canadians to kick their cup addiction.Twelve-year-olds Mya Chau and Eve Helman, and 16-year-old Ben Duthie, have nearly 105,000 signatures on a change.org petition asking Tim Hortons to replace its existing disposable coffee cups with a compostable version, or at least one that can be recycled everywhere in Canada.The three say an upcoming Roll Up the Rim to Win contest — which launches Wednesday — would be a perfect opportunity for the coffee chain to encourage Canadians to bring in reusable cups by moving the contest entirely online or running a digital version that offers two chances to win instead of one.The three note the plastic coating inside the coffee cups means most Canadian municipal recycling systems are unable to handle them and millions of them end up in landfills each year.Last year Chau and Helman petitioned Starbucks to build a better cup and Duthie was part of an effort that convinced Starbucks to ban plastic straws.Restaurant Brands International, which owns Tim Hortons, has yet to respond to the petition directly.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Indigenous community continues to mourn passing of Richard Wagamese

first_imgTodd Lamirande APTN National NewsThe passing of Indigenous author Richard Wagamese came as a shock to many who knew and respected his work.One of biggest fans is Candy Palmater.She’s well-known to APTN audiences for The Candy Show.Palmater said she became hooked after reading Wagamese’s first novel.last_img

Brock alumna named OJHL Trainer of the Year

Sarah Ditmars (BKin ’11, MA ’13) is on a breakaway and shows no signs of slowing.The Brock University alumna has been making strides in the hockey world as a therapist and trainer for the Trenton Golden Hawks.Her efforts in the male-dominated industry over the past four years have not gone unnoticed.Ditmars was recently named the Ontario Junior Hockey League Trainer of the Year.She is the first female to hold the honour.During her time at Brock, Ditmars worked as a student trainer in the University’s Athletic Therapy Clinic providing sports medicine care to varsity and recreational student athletes.She was one of only 20 students accepted into the clinic program with Joe Kenny, Head Athletic Therapist at Brock.“Sarah really embraced the diverse experiential learning opportunities that Brock University and the Department of Kinesiology offers at the undergraduate level,” Kenny said.“She was a high-energy, goal-oriented student who was always dedicated to serving athletes at Brock.”Ditmars said her time with the school clinic played a large role in shaping the career she has today.It helped her to build a strong work ethic and gain the experience needed to net a job soon after graduation.Ditmars had been home in Trenton, Ont., for less than two weeks when she scored a position at a local therapy clinic.She has since branched out on her own, offering rehabilitation and individual fitness coaching for athletes through Sarah Ditmars Sports Performance in addition to her work with the Trenton Golden Hawks.She is now in her fourth season with the hockey team.Ditmars admits there was some initial hesitation at the thought of working for a boys’ hockey team, but she’s happy with her decision to take the job.“I was young when I started and there was a lot of pressure on the team’s managers to hire a female trainer,” she said. “I knew I needed to go into it and just get the job done.” read more

Analysis Which Ohio State defenders will declare early for the NFL draft

Ohio State junior defensive end Sam Hubbard (6) prepares to defend against a Hawkeye offensive possession in the Ohio State-Iowa game on Nov. 4. Ohio State lost 24-55. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorDefensive end Tyquan Lewis, linebacker Chris Worley and 17 other Ohio State seniors will play their final collegiate game on Friday when the Buckeyes take on USC in the Cotton Bowl. They will be joined by a select group of redshirt sophomores, junior and redshirt juniors who will decide to forgo their remaining years of eligibility to test their mettle in the NFL draft. None of them have declared their intention of entering the NFL draft yet, though more than a couple will suit up for the final time in Scarlet and Gray on Friday.Here is a look at the situation of each underclassman who might declare early for the 2018 NFL Draft and play their final game for Ohio State on Friday. Also, read about which of Ohio State’s offensive players might declare early for the draft.Redshirt junior defensive end Sam HubbardWhy he would leave early: A standout on Ohio State’s loaded defensive line, Hubbard has racked up 38 tackles, 10 tackles for loss and 4.5 sacks in 2017 and was recognized as a second-team All-Big Ten honoree for his production. This follows last season’s eight tackles for loss and 3.5-sack year. Hubbard offers a blend of size (6-foot-5, 265 pounds) and athleticism that would be intriguing for NFL teams in the early rounds of the draft. He made key plays against the run and in pass rush situations, making his presence felt despite splitting reps with three other starting defensive ends. Hubbard also graduated with a degree in finance on Sunday.Why he wouldn’t leave early: With defensive ends Tyquan Lewis and Jalyn Holmes graduating, Hubbard would have an opportunity for increased playing time with Nick Bosa, Jonathon Cooper and Chase Young fighting for reps. He could potentially further increase his production and push his draft stock even higher with the greater focus on him.Prediction: Hubbard leaves for the NFL draft. There is not much left for him to prove. Even if he came back, Hubbard would have to fight for snaps with Young, Bosa and Cooper. Bosa, a likely early first-round draft pick, will garner the majority of the attention on the defensive line. Hubbard’s physical maturation and increased production make him a highly regarded NFL prospect. Plus, he already has his degree.Ohio State junior linebacker Jerome Baker (17) takes down a Badger in the third quarter of the B1G Championship game against Wisconsin on Dec. 2 in Lucas Oil Stadium. Ohio State won 27-21. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorJunior linebacker Jerome BakerWhy he would leave early: Last year, Baker seemed to be a no-doubt early entrant in the NFL draft when it became time to declare. The 2016 honorable mention All-Big Ten honoree made big plays, including interceptions against Oklahoma and Michigan, and finished with 83 tackles and 9.5 tackles for loss. Though he has had a shaky second season as a starter, he has showed off high-level athleticism that will translate to the NFL. If he returns for a third year as starter for Ohio State, he might be on his third linebackers coach in as many years, since Bill Davis’ contract ends after this season, which would throw further instability into his rocky career.Why he wouldn’t leave early: At times, Baker has looked like the weakest link in Ohio State’s defense, a statement that would have seemed incredulous a year ago. But especially early in this season, he struggled covering play-action passes, matching up with tight ends and getting out of position. Another year of development at Ohio State would allow him to continue to progress in harnessing his athleticism into making plays rather than relying on it to get himself out of bad positions. Prediction: Baker declares early for the NFL draft. Despite a disappointing season during which he failed to live up to sky-high expectations, Baker possesses loads of talent and athleticism that would intrigue teams. He might not be a top-three round pick like he was believed to be when he entered the year, but he would be drafted by a team enamored by his potential.Ohio State redshirt junior linebacker Dante Booker intercepts a pass in the second quarter of the Buckeyes game against Rutgers on Sept. 30. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorRedshirt junior linebacker Dante BookerWhy he would leave early: Booker has endured a turbulent past two seasons at Ohio State. After earning a starting spot in 2016, he injured his knee in the first game of the season that ended his campaign. This season, he started six games and played nine, but also battled injuries and did not end the season as a starter. He has 31 tackles, five for a loss and two sacks this year. If he returns for his redshirt senior season, Booker would have to battle with Tuf Borland, Baron Browning and Malik Harrison for starting spots if he were to return. The imposing 6-foot-3, 240-pound linebacker would have a shot at fighting his way onto a roster, but he would likely go undrafted.Why he wouldn’t leave early: Booker has not yet done much to prove he could make an NFL roster. He has started just seven games in college and has dealt with multiple injury issues. Also, once Booker lost his starting spot due to an injury this season, he could not reclaim it once he regained his health. Though he would have to contend with the aforementioned trio of linebackers for a starting spot, Booker could finally match his physical makeup with on-field production, which he has yet to do.Prediction: Booker returns for a final year at Ohio State. An early entree into the NFL draft would seem illogical for someone who has dealt with both injury and production issues. Having the physical embodiment of a professional linebacker matters. But if he cannot hold a starting spot or stay healthy in college, NFL teams would likely have difficulty trusting him. Another season at Ohio State could alleviate those concerns. Junior corner back Denzel Ward (12) tackles Taivon Jacobs of Maryland during the Ohio State game on Oct. 7 at Ohio Stadium. Ward was ejected immediately after for targeting. Credit: Sheridan Hendrix | Oller ReporterJunior cornerback Denzel WardWhy he would leave early: With cornerbacks Gareon Conley and Marshon Lattimore leaving early for the 2017 NFL Draft, Ward was forced into a high-pressure role as the most experienced cornerback remaining on Ohio State’s roster. He thrived as a lockdown cornerback, picking off two passes and breaking up 15 passes as a junior. There is not much more for him to prove at the collegiate level. A first-team All-American, Ward would likely be another first-round cornerback from Ohio State.Why he wouldn’t leave early: An undersized cornerback at 5-foot-10, 191 pounds, Ward could learn to further his abilities facing larger wideouts and tight ends. He could also act as a mentor for a group of cornerbacks that have struggled. He and former five-star prospect Jeffrey Okudah could make for an interesting potential starting duo. Prediction: Ward leaves early for the NFL draft. What more does he have to prove in college? A likely first-round pick who will be guaranteed millions of dollars, Ward is ready for the next step. He will always battle height issues, but has maximized his potential thus far in his football career.Ohio State redshirt sophomore defensive tackle Dre’Mont Jones patrols the sideline prior to the Buckeyes’ 62-14 win against Maryland on Oct. 7. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorRedshirt sophomore defensive tackle Dre’Mont JonesWhy he would leave early: Jones entered the year and, when healthy, lived up to his billing as a speedy, undersized defensive tackle. The former defensive end picked up 20 tackles, five tackles for loss and a sack. Though his limited production would likely cap his draft stock, he stood out this season while playing on a line filled with future NFL players. His speed and explosiveness would translate to the NFL and he already has two seasons of starting experience at the collegiate level. Why he wouldn’t leave early: Sophomore defensive end Nick Bosa hinted Jones might return to school to improve his pass rush numbers and prove he could be an asset in the NFL with an improved interior pass rush. His explosiveness has not translated into consistent sacks. A third season as a starter at Ohio State would allow NFL teams to see a part of his game that exists, but has not been consistent. Also, with Lewis, Holmes and, possibly, Hubbard leaving for the NFL, Jones would have a larger spotlight.Prediction: Jones returns for a fourth year at Ohio State. Many people believed Jones would make a leap into the upper echelon of collegiate defensive tackles this season. Though he had a productive year, he battled a freak injury suffered due to scraping his leg on a locker and had just five tackle for loss. His athleticism allows for a higher ceiling which he has yet to reach.Ohio State sophomore cornerback Kendall Sheffield (8) waits to defend a UNLV play in the third quarter of the Ohio State- UNLV game on Sep. 23. Ohio State won 54- 21. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorRedshirt sophomore cornerback Kendall SheffieldWhy he would leave early: At the beginning of the season, Sheffield struggled in coverage. In the opening week against Indiana, he looked like a sieve as quarterback Richard Lagow trounced the Ohio State defensive backfield, including Sheffield. But as the year progressed, so do Sheffield. A former five-star prospect and Alabama transfer, Sheffield has the physical traits NFL teams desire. Though he would not be an early pick in the NFL draft, his in-season improvement would interest teams.Why he wouldn’t leave early: Given his physical gifts, Sheffield has a high ceiling that he has not come close to maximizing. Ohio State has a rich recent history of turning out first-round cornerbacks. If he were to enter the draft after the Cotton Bowl, Sheffield would not be a first rounder. But after a second year as a starter, he would have a chance to develop into Ohio State’s next lockdown cornerback.Prediction: Sheffield heads back to school for his fourth year of collegiate football and second at Ohio State. He could be on his week-to-week improvement being enough to prove to NFL teams that he deserves a chance or return and make further additions to his game. With Ward likely heading to the NFL, Sheffield’s opportunities at Ohio State would be plentiful.Ohio State redshirt sophomore cornerback Damon Arnette (3) waits to defend against a Penn State offensive drive in the second quarter in the game against Penn State on Oct. 28. Ohio State won 39-38. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorRedshirt sophomore cornerback Damon ArnetteWhy he would leave early: Arnette lacks the physical ceiling of Sheffield and the innate sense of swatting passes that Ward possesses. But he has shown the versatility to move between the outside to slot cornerback positions. He is willing to rough up wide receivers near the line of scrimmage. NFL teams would notice his lack of physical gifts, but would also appreciate his physicality.Why he wouldn’t leave early: The Buckeyes hopes Arnette would step into a larger role last season and this season, but he failed to become the next Ohio State cornerback success story. With two more years of eligibility, he has years to make the necessary improvements needed to make him an NFL cornerback, which he likely is not right now.Prediction: Arnette returns to Ohio State for his fourth year in college. He would likely go undrafted and struggle to make an NFL roster. With added experience, Arnette could move from a liability in coverage to a strength. Ohio State will be relying on him to take the next step against next year, as it was this season. read more

Heres What Happened Today Tuesday

first_imgNEED TO CATCH up? TheJournal.ie brings you a round-up of today’s news…Sister and brother ZeJin Qu (age 4) and ZeKai Qu (age 6) from Clare Hall, Dublin joined with Oscar from the Garda Mounted Unit on the grounds of Aras an Uachtarain to launch the Chinese New Years. (Leon Farrell/ Photocall Ireland)IRELANDA group representing fire fighters began a court action against Dublin City Council over failing breathing apparatus setsThe government announced that it was to reopen the Vatican embassy, just 26 months after closing itGardaí revealed that there were 805 drink-drive arrests during their Christmas operationsA law that allows TDs and senators escape punishment when driving to or from Leinster House was criticised by a Labour senatorThe DSPCA said that it had been forced to put down three dogs after finding them living in ‘appalling conditions’The President defended his wife’s visit to jailed anti-war protester Margaretta D’ArcyThe Central Bank unveiled plans for their new headquarters in Dublin’s DocklandsGardaí appealed for witnesses, particularly a taxi driver, to an assault in Dublin at the weekendIndependent TD Mattie McGrath said that he would consider joining the Reform AllianceA Dublin hospital has apologised to a family over the death of their two-day-old son [RTÉ]INTERNATIONALA pro-European Union activist speaks to police officers as they block a street in central Kiev, Ukraine. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)#UKRAINE: Clashes between pro-EU protesters and government forces entered a third day in the Ukrainian capital of Kiev today. The fighting came as new laws that restrict protest came into force. #SYRIA: Three international prosecutors say that they have uncovered evidence that proves the Syrian regime authorised the torture and execution of over 11,000 people. The graphic images are contained in a report commissioned by Qatar.#PARKED-UP PINTS: The first motorway pub in Britain opened its doors today. The Hope and Champion is on the main motorway between London and Birmingham. Road safety groups called the opening of the pub a “worrying development”.INNOVATIONThe next-gen console wars have gotten dirty – and it seems like Microsoft has been a naughty boy. [TheGuardian]A new digital stethoscope can help spot heart murmurs, even extremely subtle ones. [Gizmodo]PARTING SHOTEver wondered the extent of visual effects shots in films these days? Obviously, effects-laden comic book movies have their share, but what about dramas? Surely they would be at a minimum? Take a look inside FXGuide’s breakdown of The Wolf of Wall Street and be slightly shocked.last_img read more

Pepsi creates plastic bottle from 100 plant material

first_imgRegardless of your preference for Pepsi or Coca-Cola, if you buy it in bottles then that isn’t great for the environment. The petroleum-based plastic used to create them can take decades to breakdown and can’t easily be recycled.Coca-Cola has already started experimenting with using renewable material in its bottles which make up around 30% of each bottle. But Pepsi has gone a step further and managed to make a new plastic bottle consisting of only plant materials, therefore breaking the link and reliance on petroleum.The new bottles use a mix of switch grass, pine bark, corn husks, and a number of other renewable materials. Importantly, Pepsi has managed to make the new bottle indistinguishable from the old one so it will have no impact on marketing or brand recognition. It has done this by matching the molecular stucture of the old bottles using the plant materials, so not only does it look the same, but it has the same feel and strength.The best news is for the environment, though. Pepsi produces billions of bottles every year and starting in 2012 they will begin moving over to renewable bottle production that’s 100% recyclable. Eventually all Pepsi bottles will be made of plant materials.Anyone worried about Pepsi running out of these plant materials used to produce so many bottles shouldn’t be. The design of the bottle allows for other plant materials including orange peel, potato peel and oat hulls to be used as alternatives in the mix. Other plant material types are also being considered making for a very versatile plastic material that could certainly be used in other industries.Read more at the Pepsi press release, via NZ Herald Newslast_img read more

Piracy on Android and iOS an interview with MadFinger Games

first_imgNo matter the platform, no matter the content, there are people out there who feel that pirating what they want is the way to go. Sometimes it is because the content is not available in the way they wish to consume it. Sometimes the content is not available for sale in their geographic area or in a time frame that they consider reasonable. It gets justified with statements like this one by Wind-up Knight developer Chris Pruett, who recently wrote that “a huge number of people who pirate software would never buy it in a million years”. For the small Czech Republic based MadFinger Games, app piracy is very real. In fact, it’s something they are forced to deal with every day.The MadFinger backstoryFollowing a brief post on Facebook explaining why the price for Dead Trigger had changed on the Play Store, MadFinger faced a huge wave of press and far more attention than they had intended. The post was just meant as a quick note to explain why the price had changed, and MadFinger found themselves as the new poster child for the software piracy levels on Android. To make matters worse, more than a couple of users took to social networks very unhappy with MadFinger for making the game they just purchased free.During my interview with MadFinger co-founder Marek Rabas, he said that the response to their little Facebook post was overwhelming and demotivating. “It was never our intention to make users upset.” said Rabas when asked how many users were unhappy. In the end, Rabas explained that it was a pretty small group of people that were upset about the decision, but it had to be done. This wasn’t a new maneuver from MadFinger, either. Another title, Shadowgun, was dropped to $1 after the first month the game was on iOS, and on Android it plummeted from $5 to $0.50 very quickly. The only difference with Dead Trigger was that the price drop didn’t stop the pirates.So why drop the price to zero? Does that really stop piracy? Rabas was unable to answer that question, stating that MadFinger hadn’t collected enough information yet to see if piracy had decreased after the drop. “We’re a small firm” he explained “and we had to focus on a game patch first”. Apparently, there was a game save floating around that granted users nearly infinite resources to buy whatever you wanted from the store, and stopping that was a priority for MadFinger.Global piracyThere’s an assumption that the large majority of the software piracy data that is shown includes China. Since you can’t buy apps on Android if you are in China, app piracy is supposed to be significantly higher there. In fact, during my conversation with Marek Rabas he noted that they don’t include China when they look at piracy for their games, because piracy is just as bad on iOS in China. Even though you are able to make app purchases on an iPhone in China, Rabas said that of the thousands of Shadowgun users in China, only 61 people in China have actually paid for the app.While Mr. Rabas was unable to provide me with exact number, he said that the US was home to a “significant portion” of app piracy. On Facebook, MadFinger stated that the Android app piracy for Dead Trigger was much higher than iOS. In fact, Rabas noted that the piracy levels on iOS are even lower than they are for Shadowgun on iOS. Shadowgun, which is also a MadFinger title, has been out for much longer than Dead Trigger, still sees a high piracy rate on iOS as well as Android.In my opinion, Dead Trigger is a much better game than Shadowgun, which could explain why there are fewer people willing to pirate the game on iOS. If they know it is a quality game, perhaps those users have decided it’s worth the $.99 to take out your frustration on the undead horde while waiting in line somewhere. Or perhaps the games aren’t stolen as much on iOS because the users who are pirating apps know that the real savings is pirating once you are inside the game.App Piracy vs In App PiracyDead Trigger is designed to encourage in app purchases. When you start a level, the game will recommend what weapons are best for the mission ahead and the store is filled with items that you can only purchase with gold bricks. After 30 hours of gameplay, I have earned just three of the fifty gold bricks I need for the weapon I want. I could keep playing… or I could spend $0.99 and get a whole pile of gold bricks to load up my character with. MadFinger doesn’t force you to ever spend a dollar once you are in the game, you can absolutely play and enjoy the game with the weapons you earn by mission grinding for cash. It is, however, far more satisfying to play the game with the larger weapons.Dead Trigger may be seeing more sales on iOS when it comes to purchasing the game, but according to MadFinger the in app purchasing setup for iOS is a regular problem. Compared to Android users, Marek Rabas noted that iOS users are significantly more likely to make in app purchases. Android users just don’t make that many IAP’s, at least not for Dead Trigger. Alongside those higher in app purchase levels, Dead Trigger sees significant in app piracy rates for iOS. Rabas commented that Android users hardly ever pirate in app purchases, due largely to Apple’s implementation of IAP being worse than Google’s.“Jelly Bean and iOS 6 will help”Google and Apple have been aware of the piracy issues their platforms face for some time now. Google’s “Bouncer” among other solutions have already started to show some results, and Apple has already noted that iOS 6 will have some new app security features. The biggest place that piracy happens on Android now for MadFinger games is Android 2.3. During my interview with MadFinger, Rabas said that app piracy is far less an issue on Android 4.1. The app encryption features that come along with Android 4.1 are making a big difference for firms like MadFinger.Unfortunately, if any app developer were to limit a game to the most recent version of Android, there would comparably very few people able to play the game. Android 2.3 is still the most common version of Android, and it will likely be some time before that changes. For iOS users, version 6 will be available to almost every Apple product within the next few months, and the app pirates will have to find a new way to get their apps.last_img read more

One person hospitalized after fourvehicle I5 crash

first_imgA four-vehicle crash that started with a rear-ender on Interstate 5 north of Ridgefield sent one person to the hospital Friday night.According to the Washington State Patrol, Lili Jiang, 21, of Houghton, Mich., was driving south near Ridgefield when she couldn’t stop in time for traffic ahead.Her Jeep crashed into a newer Volkswagen Beetle, which in turn was pushed into a Mazda sedan, which went into  a Dodge Dakota pickup, the state patrol said.The driver of the Volkswagen — Ashley V. Wallace, 19, of Woodland — was taken to Legacy Salmon Creek Medical Center for her injuries.A 6-year-old boy riding in the Mazda was hurt as well, but he was not hospitalized.Jiang was unhurt, as were the drivers in the Mazda and the pickup.The state patrol said she was cited for following too closely.last_img read more

BTS Wrap Up Successful US Tour on Ellen

first_imgPop group continues U.S. tour with a stop on the comedian’s daytime talk showPhilip MerrillGRAMMYs Nov 27, 2017 – 4:43 pm On Nov. 27 BTS band members J-Hope, Jimin, Jin, Jungkook, RM, Suga, and V introduced themselves to Ellen DeGeneres during their American daytime debut on “Ellen.” As one could tell from the audience’s shouts, BTS won new friends as a band.. That was part of the colorful message their hit “DNA” was all about.Leader RM shared the details of how mothers in South Korea made English mandatory viewing. His mother’s gift of “Friends” on DVD felt like an imposition at first but the show became the gateway for BTS to forge  new friendships in the U.S. that look likely to last.In addition to “Ellen,” their U.S. tour of stops also included appearances on James Corden and Jimmy Kimmel’s talk shows.For new fans and the semi-converted who are just K-pop curious for now, the multitude of impressions from this BTS U.S. visit have certainly garnered new interest.BTS, UNICEF Join Forces Against Violence With Love Myself CampaignRead more Twitter Catch BTS On “Ellen” bts-wrap-successful-us-tour-ellen BTS Wrap Up Successful U.S. Tour on “Ellen” News Email Facebook last_img read more

YSR Rythu Bharosa to be implemented from October in Vijayawada

first_imgVijayawada: Endowments Minister Vellampalli Srinivas said on Monday that the State government would implement ‘Rythu Bharosa’ scheme with effect from October 2019 in the State and would sanction Rs 12,500 to each farmer as financial assistance for cultivation of crops as part of the programme.The Endowments Minister along with Central MLA Malladi Vishnu inaugurated the Rythu Dinotsavam, the farmers’ Day at Kundavari Kandrika village, to mark the birth anniversary of former Chief Minister Dr Y S Rajasekhara Reddy. Also Read – Astrologer refutes charges against him Advertise With Us Local farmers and officials of the agriculture, animal husbandry, fisheries and other departments attended the event. The State government has decided to celebrate the Farmers’ Day on July 8 to mark the birth anniversary of former Chief Minister Rajasekhara Reddy. Speaking on the occasion, Srinivas said the State government has decided to implement the Rythu Bharosa from October 2019 and will sanction Rs 12,500 financial assistance to each farmer. He said the YSRCP government is determined to give nine-hour power supply to the farmers during the day at any cost and would distribute fertilisers and seeds to the farmers at subsidised prices. Also Read – Jasti bags 16th rank in NEET Super Specialty Entrance Advertise With Us He said the YSRCP government has taken very important decisions during the last 40 days of rule and it would adopt farmer friendly policies in the State. Central MLA Malladi Vishnu said the State government has taken important decision to sanction crop loans to the tenant farmers also. He said the farmers would get all kinds of support under the YSRCP rule. Advertise With Us The Minister and the MLA felicitated some progressive farmers on the occasion. Vijayawada Lok Sabha constituency YSRCP co-ordinator Potluri Vara Prasad said that late Y S Rajasekhara Reddy was well known for adopting farmers’ friendly policies and lauded the services rendered o people by the departed leader. Agriculture, horticulture, animal husbandry, fisheries and other departments have set up stalls in the village and explained their services.last_img read more

Infosys TCS worst affected by US visa fee hike IDFC Securities

first_imgIndia’s top two IT firms Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) and Infosys will be the “worst affected” companies by a sharp hike in work permit visas issued by the US government, according to a brokerage firm.Last week, the US government increased the fee to $4,000 for H-1B visas and $4,500 for L-1 visas. These work permit visas allow companies to hire highly-skilled workers from other countries when there is non-availability of such workers in the US.As domestic IT companies are among the top recipients of such visas issued by the US, analysts have raised concerns about a steep hike in visa fee weighing on margins of IT firms.”Higher visa costs will hit outsourcers that have large exposure to US markets. Infosys and TCS would be the worst affected,” said IDFC Securities in a report.While Infosys earns 60% of its income from the US, 50% of the revenue for TCS comes from North America. Although, Wipro and HCL Tech derive 50% of their revenues from the US market, the US visa usage of these companies is not so high compared to their peers.”Infosys uses proportionally highest H-1B and TCS has the biggest pool for L-1,” IDFC Securities said.In 2014, Indian workers accounted for receiving 70% of the 65,000 H-1B visas handed out by the US. TCS was the top receiver of H-1B visas last year, obtaining 5,650. Infosys (3,454) and Wipro (3,048) were also among the top receivers, The New York Times reported.As TCS and Infosys spend large amounts on acquiring the US visas, doubling of fee on such visas will increase their costs sharply.Overall, doubling of H-1B visa fee by the US is expected to cost Indian IT companies nearly $400 million. The Indian IT sector did not expect such a steep hike in visa fee, though it was prepared for an increase.Rise in visa costs will hit the service-based IT companies the most, while it will also affect product development companies.”We see an impact of 50-70 basis points as the charge is applied to extension of H-1B (awarded for 3 years with scope of 3 years extension), which was not the case earlier. Our sensitivity analysis indicates earnings impact of 2-4 per cent due to the new law,” NDTV Profit quoted IDFC analyst Shashi Bhusan as saying.last_img read more

Wii U online service will be completely free

first_imgWhen the Wii U launches later this year Nintendo will be pushing the social aspects of the machine as much as the games. The company is also embracing digital games and DLC, much like Sony and Microsoft did with their current generation hardware.During Nintendo’s annual shareholder meeting today, the inevitable question came up as to whether there will be a charge for certain aspects of the online experience. In other words, will Nintendo be launching an equivalent to Xbox Live Gold and PSN Plus?Nintendo CEO Satoru Iwata responded by saying that a payment for connecting other devices to the Nintendo Network made sense, but for the Wii U itself a subscription charge is not being considered. So that means Wii U users will never have to pay extra to go online using their console.As to what Iwata meant by “other devices” I have to assume he means non-Nintendo hardware. The 3DS should connect for free to the Nintendo Network, but if you want to hook your tablet up to watch some content, Nintendo would like some cash.It’s unlikely Nintendo would consider offering such an option as they’d rather keep you using just the Wii U and 3DS. But saying that, there’s nothing to stop the company charging third-parties in exchange for offering Nintendo Network compatibility as part of their devices.Another question asked during the shareholder meeting was whether we can expect anymore iterations of the 3DS hardware following the 3DS XL announcement. Iwata says that’s very unlikely, and Nintendo only developed the XL version because there was such demand for bigger displays.Read more at Andriasanglast_img read more

Benefits of feeding dogs right during monsoon

first_imgHair shedding, immunity issues or an infection – the answer to these problems faced by your dog can be found in their diet, say experts. Pet Experts and Veterinary Surgeons, suggest a few dietary tips and tricks to take care of your pet this monsoon:Fighting infections: Diet is the one of the most important elements to solve the underlying problem of yeast build up and its resulting infections throughout a dog’s body. One of the symptoms is excessive itching, in case such symptoms persist consult your vet. Add balanced fibrous food to your dog’s diet to ensure regular bowel movements, which in the rainy season can be a blessing as the exposure to outdoors can be restricted. You can try to engage your dog in some indoor exercises to prevent weight gain. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfBuilding immunity: A dog’s diet is the foundation of building good immunity. Every dog’s requirement for nutrition is different. For instance, a large sized adult dog’s nutritional needs vary from that of a small sized adult dog. An ideal wholesome meal should contain Vitamin C, Vitamin E and Omega 3 fatty acids as they have important immune and anti-inflammatory functions that contribute to a dog’s health and vitality. Your dog’s meal should contain these nutrients. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveTaking care of your puppy: New born pups are the most susceptible to infections. There is an ‘Immunity Gap’ when they wean off their mother’s milk and this is an extremely crucial time to ensure that they are fed a diet which has been carefully designed to deal with the situation. To bridge this gap, it is imperative to feed them the optimal pet food which contains colostrum. Since, colostrum is first milk produced by the mother immediately after giving birth, it is highly important for newborn pups. Colostrum can also be found as a special ingredient in select packaged pet foods. Pet food fortified with colostrum is proven to enhance immune response in pups for an overall promotion of their digestive and immune health and response to vaccination. Avoid hair shedding: A pet’s coat is the reflection of its health and the food that it consumes. A shiny and healthy coat is the result of optimal nutrition which is a key to a dog’s general well-being. Provide your dog with high quality diet with digestible protein sources. Foods with Omega 3 fatty acids also play an important role in promoting a healthy coat with minimal shedding. What to avoid this season: It is quite common for pet owners to feed their pets with whatever is on their plate or the leftovers. Avoid raw meat, raw chicken, excessive fibrous vegetables and raw or cooked bones. It is essential to follow a particular diet plan and a close watch should be kept on a dog’s health when switching food habits.last_img read more

Reliving memories through art

first_imgOpenings windows to their imaginings of a reality that is unconventional and far removed from everyday trials, a group of artist have up with an artshow .Titled ‘Tales of Yore’, the month-long exhibition has invited artists, sculptors and satirists including K G Subramanyan, Shanti Dave, Jogen Chowdhary, Manu Parekh, K S Radhakrishnan, Arpana Caur, Sanjay Bhattacharya, to name a few, and will go until February 28 Every work of art displayed is a passage its creator travels to tell a story, to make newer discoveries of visions gifted by time and its many paradigms. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfViewers can see the conflict between flawless time and the raw innocence of imagination which is best captured by the forever pursuits of quizzing minds that artists epitomise. One of the artist Sandeep Jingdung has tried to reflect the experiences of his birth place Assam through his art work. From its flora and fauna, childhood memories to his love for natural surroundings, he has tried to infuse everything on the canvas beautifully. On the other hand, K S Radhakrishnan with his sculptures attempts to give a reflection of history, memory loss and his deep engagement with the world. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveApart from nature and childhood memories, artists have also tried to depict different cultural aspects, imaginary characters and a lot more. Based on mythology, Jayasri Burman’s artworks have a lyrical quality, decorative designs and elements of folk idiom. Whereas, Arpana’s work are feminine in context. Female figures emerge as symbols of solidarity. Internationally acclaimed artist Jogen Chowdhury has also displayed his works in the exhibition. Based on the memories, thoughts, dream and his immediate environment, the work is the combination of satire and anger, and real with imaginary in a fine sensibility and technique used by him.last_img read more

VIDEO Early US Experience With FFRCT in Evaluating ED Chest Pain Presentation

first_imgFind more SCCT news and videos Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Recent Videos View all 606 items Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. FFR-CT — TCT 2016Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 6:07Loaded: 2.68%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -6:07 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floorcenter_img Find more news and videos from AAPM. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology View all 220 items A discussion with Simon Dixon, M.D., MBChB, on the use of fractional flow reserve-computed tomography (FFR-CT) to evaluate chest pain patients in the emergency department. He is chairman of the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine at Beaumont Health System and a professor of Medicine at the Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine. He discussed the first year of experience with FFR-CT at Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Mich., during the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) 2016 annual meeting. Read the article “Clinical Applications of FFR-CT.” Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | December 19, 2016 VIDEO: Early U.S. Experience With FFR-CT in Evaluating ED Chest Pain Presentation Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Women’s Health View all 62 items Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Technology Reports View all 9 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Conference Coverage View all 396 items Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videoslast_img read more

Face to face essential to business travel Blair

first_imgDespite the uncertain economy, business travel is likely to pick up over the coming year, as face to face contact remains essential to business growth, according to American Express Global Business Travel VP Trena Blair.“As business travel is both an essential part of global economic performance as well as an enabler of business growth, we expect the combination of demand and effective travel supplier yield management to likely push rates business travellers pay up across the board in 2012,” Mr Blair said.According to the annual American Express Global Business Forecast, Business travel prices are also likely to rise in the Asia and Latin America markets due to the increase in travel demand within these regions, whilst in North America and Europe prices are expected to remain steady.“The travel industry remains a complex and ever changing marketplace as it seeks to regain both pre-recession pricing and profitability levels in the face of economic anxiety,” Mr Blair said.The Asia Pacific region is expected to lead in business travel demand, resulting in a significant increase in airfares for the region for 2012 in addition of significant increases in prices paid in 2011, the forecast suggests.Mr Blair added on a whole the Asian market continues to show growth and business travel remains strong as companies from across the globe continue to send travellers to the region to profit on its economic growth.  “Accordingly, airfare in Asia Pacific is generally expected to rise next year, especially for long-haul flights.” Source = e-Travel Blackboard: S.Plast_img read more